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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The surrender at Appomattox Court House. (search)
er to Lee and dispatching it he prepared to move forward. The letter was as follows: April 9TH, 1865. General: Your note of yesterday is received. I have no authority to treat on the subjem Lee, which had been sent in to our lines on Humphreys's front. It read as follows: April 9TH, 1865. General: I received your note of this morning on the picket-line, whither I had come tod, sat down on the grassy bank by the roadside, and wrote the following reply to Lee: April 9TH, 1865. General R. E. Lee, Commanding C. S. Army: Your note of this date is but this moment (11, was as follows: General R. E. Lee, commanding C. S. A. Appomattox Court House, Va., April 9, 1865. General: in accordance with the substance of my letter to you of the 8th inst., I propos The letter when completed read as follows: headquarters, Army of Northern Virginia, April 9th, 1865. General: I received your letter of this date containing the terms of the surrender of t
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 21: closing events of the War.--assassination of the President. (search)
hat Grant and Lee were then making arrangements for a surrender of the Army of Northern Virginia. Grant, after sending Lee his note, written that morning, April 9, 1865. had left Meade, crossed the Appomattox, and was hurrying on to join Sheridan and Griffin, when he was handed a letter from the Confederate leader, in which hellion, so long as they should respect that parole and be obedient to law. The following is the text of the Capitulation:-- Appomattox Court-House, Va., April 9, 1865. General — In accordance with the substance of my letter to you of the 8th instant, I propose to receive the surrender of the Army of Northern Virginia on terve their paroles and the laws in force where they reside. U. S. Grant, Lieutenant General. General R. E. Lee. Headquarters, Army of Northern Virginia, April 9, 1865. General — I received your letter of this date, containing the terms of the surrender of the Army of Northern Virginia, as proposed by you. As they are subs
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 53: operations of the West Gulf Squadron in the latter part of 1864, and in 1865.--joint operations in Mobile Bay by Rear-Admiral Thatcher and General Canby. (search)
destroyed on this occasion. Fortunately the war was over and the Government did not need the vessels, which were valuable ones. The following is a list of the losses experienced by the sinking of the vessels named above: Osage, 3 killed, 8 wounded; Rodolph, 4 killed, 11 wounded; Cincinnati's launch, 3 killed; Althea, 2 killed, 2 wounded; Sciota, 4 killed, 6 wounded; Ida, 2 killed, 3 wounded. Though the war may be said to have virtually ended by the surrender of General Lee, on April 9th, 1865, and of General Joe Johnston, on April 27th, and naval and military operations against the Confederates may be said to have ceased, yet up to the last moment the Texans were apparently as active as ever in their domain, and for a short time it looked as if they were going to fight it out on that line, if it took all summer. One of their last acts was an attempt to run the blockade with the ram Webb, which had made herself so famous in sinking the Indianola. The Webb was remarkably f
about midnight. Before starting next morning to join Sheridan and Griffin, he dispatched the following reply: April 9, 1865. General — Your note of yesterday is received. I have no authority to treat on the subject of peace. The meetingitulation. Gen. Grant, before reaching Sheridan's head quarters, had received the following additional note: April 9, 1865. General — I received your note of this morning on the picket-line, whither I had come to meet you, and ascertain work was done by the chiefs, and its result summed up in these concluding letters: Appomattox Court House, Va., April 9, 1865. General — In accordance with the substance of my letter to you of the 8th instant, I propose to receive the surren force where they may reside. U. S. Grant, Lt.-General. General R. E. Lee. headquarters army of Northern Va., April 9, 1865. General — I received your letter of this date, containing the terms of the surrender of the Army of Northern Vir
nt on that field occurred in the Thirteenth U. S. Colored Infantry, which, in its assault on Overton Hill, lost 55 killed (including 4 officers), and 166 wounded; Includes the mortally wounded. total, 221. The severest loss at the battle of Honey Hill, S. C., November 30, 1864, fell on a black regiment, the Fifty-fifth Massachusetts, which lost in that action, 29 killed, and 115 wounded; total, 144. In the closing battle of the war — the victorious assault on Fort Blakely, Ala., April 9, 1865--a colored division bore a conspicuous and honorable part. Among the casualties in that engagement the following are worthy of note: Regiment. Killed. Wounded. Includes the mortally wounded. Missing Total. 68th U. S. Colored Infantry 10 91 -- 101 76th U. S. Colored Infantry 13 78 -- 91 In addition to the battles heretofore mentioned, colored troops were prominently engaged in the following actions: Morris Island. S. C. James Island, S. C. Liverpool Heights, Miss.
d epitaph, Unknown. Killed at Malvern Hill, July 11 1862; and there rises a picture of an artilleryman lying dead at the wheels of his gun. Died of gunshot wound before Atlanta, August 20, 1864, tells of some lad who fills a grave long miles away from the village church-yard of his Northern home. Wounded at Antietam, September 17, 1862, and died on the amputating table, brings up the dire vision of the field-hospital, that ghastly sequel of every battle. Killed at Appomattox, April 9, 1865; and one sees the dead cavalryman, who, falling in that closing battle of the war, died with home and victory in sight. Died of sunstroke, recalls the long march, the heavy load, the dust, the heat, and a senseless form lying at the roadside. Died of fever at Young's Point, Miss., reminds one of the campaigns in the bayous and poisonous swamps, with the men falling in scores before a foe more deadly and remorseless than the bullet. Executed on sentence of G. C. M.; shot to death
for duty, equipped. In the closing battles of the war, from March 29th to April 9th, 1865--including Gravelly Run, White Oak Road, and Five Forks--the casualties inipated in the investment of that city, and in the storming of Fort Blakely, April 9, 1865, which was the last general engagement of the war. The Thirteenth Corps e last infantry engagement of the war. Fort Blakely was carried by assault, April 9, 1865, the day on which Lee surrendered at Appomattox. The corps organization wae 24; Dinwiddie Court House, March 31; Five Forks, April 1; and Appomattox, April 9, 1865. In August, 1864, Sheridan was promoted to the command of the Army of thnts 454 2,817 646 3,917 Fall of Petersburg and Pursuit of Lee, March 29--April 9, 1865 221 930 339 1,490 It will be observed that over one-fourth of these l Long and Upton. Although the last infantry engagement of the war occurred April 9, 1865, Wilson's Corps fought at Columbus, Ga., on the 16th of April, 1865, in a s
Sailor's Creek, Va., April 6, 1865 4 Meadow Bridge, Va., May 12, 1864 1 Farmville, Va., April 7, 1865 2 Hawes' Shop, Va., May 28, 1864 1 Appomattox, Va., April 9, 1865 7 Cold Harbor, Va., June 2, 1864 2 Picket Duty 2 Skirmish, Va., June 19, 1864 1 Place Unknown 11 notes.--This regiment sustained the heaviest loss, 1862 1 Petersburg, Va., July--, 1864 2 Farmville, Va., April 7, 1865 2 Brandy Station, Va., June 9, 1863 4 Shenandoah, Va., July--, 1864 1 Appomattox, Va., April 9, 1865 1 Aldie, Va., June 22, 1863 1 Malvern Hill, Va., July 28, 1864 7 Andersonville Prison 1 Sulphur Springs, Va., Oct. 12, 1863 8 Deep Bottom, Va., Aug. 14, r New Orleans, proceeding thence, in March, to Mobile, where it was prominently engaged in the siege of that place. In the successful assault on Fort Blakely, April 9, 1865, it lost 10 killed and 54 wounded; its colors were the first on the enemy's works, the color-sergeant falling dead in the charge. In June, 1864, the recruits
h Corps, at the Fall of Petersburg, High Bridge, and Appomattox. The cavalry sustained losses daily, from Gravelly Run to Appomattox.             March 29--April 9, 1865.             198th Pennsylvania Griffin's Fifth 37 178 22 237 91st New York Crawford's Fifth 33 176 21 230 185th New York Griffin's Fifth 32 171 6 209Cavalry 12 80 -- 92 Spanish Fort, Ala.             April 8, 1865.             8th Iowa Carr's Sixteenth 8 43 2 53 Fort Blakely, Ala.             April 9, 1865.             68th U. S. Colored Hawkins's ------------ 10 91 -- 101 76th Illinois Andrews's Thirteenth 17 81 -- 98 11th Wisconsin Garrard's Sixteenth f April, 1865, at Boykin's Mills. Some fighting also occurred at Palmetto Ranch, Texas, on May 13th, 1865. But the war ended, substantially, at Appomattox, April 9, 1865. Fort Blakely, Ala., fell the same day, carried by a bloody assault. The war commenced on the 19th of April, 1861, and was offi
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), chapter 9 (search)
up, we fed him and his officers and lent them blankets. Grant had one of his sick headaches, which are rare, but cause him fearful pain, such as almost overcomes even his iron stoicism. To show how really amiable he is, he let the officers drum on the family piano a long while before he even would hint he didn't like it. Towards sundown we could hear rapid artillery from direction of Appomattox Station, which made us anxious; for we knew it was Sheridan, and could not know the result. April 9, 1865 We all were up, according to habit, about daylight, with horses saddled, having staid near Stute's house for the night. In reply to a summons from Grant, Lee has sent in a note to say that he would meet Grant at ten A. M. to confer on measures for peace. The Lieutenant-General answered that he had no authority in the premises and refused the interview; but repeated his offer to accept the army's surrender on parole. Indeed, we suspected his affairs were from bad to worse, for last n
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