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gh the 1500 talents, might have been appropriated to the erection of the new basilica, subsequent writers would naturally suppose that the money had been expended upon the building which bore the name of Aemilius Paullus in their own time. For a further discussion of this subject, which hardly belongs to the present work, the reader is referred to Becker (l.c.) The basilica Aemilia in the forum was rebuilt at his own expense by Paullus Aemilius Lepidus [No. 19], the son of the present article, and dedicated in his consulship, B. C. 34 (D. C. 49.42). It was burnt down twenty years afterwards, B. C. 14, by a fire, which also destroyed the temple of Vesta, and was rebuilt nominally by Paullus Lepidus, but in reality by Augustus and the friends of Paullus (D. C. 54.24). The new building was a most magnificent one; its columns of Phrygian marble were especially celebrated (Plin. Nat. 36.15, 24). It was again repaired by Lepidus [No. 23] in the reign of Tiberius, A. D. 22 (Tac. Ann. 3.72
alue, as this writer always speaks favourably of the friends of Augustus, are confirmed by the weightier authority of Tacitus, who bears the strongest testimony to the virtues and wisdom of Lepidus. (Tac. Ann. 4.20.) The name of M. Lepidus occurs several times in Tacitus, and must be carefully distinguished from that of M'. Lepidus [see No. 25], with which it is frequently confounded, both in the MSS. and editions of the historian. M. Lepidus is first mentioned in Tacitus at the accession of Tiberius, A. D. 14, next in A. D. 21, when he declined the proconsulate of Africa, and also in the debate in the senate in the same year respecting the punishment of C. Lutorius Priscus; again in A. D. 24; then in A. D. 26, when he was appointed governor of the province of Asia; and lastly in A. D. 33, which was the year of his death. (Tac. Ann. 1.13, 3.35, 50, 4.20, 56, 6.27.) It was this M. Lepidus who repaired the Aemilia Basilica in A. D. 22 (Tac. Ann. 3.72), as is mentioned above. [No. 16.]
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
e other wing, defeated Cassius and obtained possession of his camp. Cassius himself, supposing all was lost, and ignorant of the success of Brutus, commanded his freedman Pindarus to put an end to his life. Brutus mourned over his companion, calling him the last of the Romans, and caused him to be buried in Thasos. Cassius was married to Junia Tertia or Tertulla, half-sister of his confederate, M. Brutus: she survived him upwards of sixty years, and did not die till the reign of Tiberius, A. D. 22. [JUNIA, No. 3.] Only one of his children is mentioned [See No. 13], and we do not know whether he had any more. Cassius was a man of literary tastes and habits. He received instruction in the Greek language and literature from Archelaus of Rhodes, and he both wrote and spoke Greek with facility. He was a follower of the Epicurean philosophy; but was absteimious and simple in his mode of life. His abilities were considerable; and though he would certainly have been incapable, like Caesar
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Niger, Bruti'dius aedile A. D. 22, and one of the accusers of D. Silanus (Tac. Ann. 3.66 ). He appears to be the same as the Brutidius of whom Juvenal speaks (10.82) in his account of the fall of Sejanus, and likewise the same as the Brutidius Niger, of whose writings the elder Seneca has preserved two passages relating to the death of Cicero. (Senec. Suas. 7.)
Otho, Ju'nius 1. A rhetorician frequently mentioned by the elder Seneca. He was the author of a work on that branch of rhetoric entitled colores (respecting the meaning of which see Quint. Inst. 4.2.88). Through the influence of Sejanus, Otho was made a senator, and by due subservience to the ruling powers, he obtained the praetorship in A. D. 22, in which year he is mentioned as one of the accusers of C. Silanus, proconsul of Asia. (Senec. Control. 1.3, Declam.2.1, &c.; Tac. Ann. 3.66.)
Paco'nius, M. 3. M. Paconius, a legatus of Silanus, proconsul of Asia, was one of his accusers in A. D. 22. Paconius was afterwards put to death by Tiberius on a charge of treason. He was the father of Paconius Agrippinus. (Tac. Ann. 3.67; Suet. Tib. 61.)
you had attacked him in his lifetime; for only a man can assail a living tyrant, any one can when dead" (2.32.2). Vossius and others had fallen into the error of supposing that this tyrant was Domitian, but Perizonius pointed out the impossibility of a man who was twenty-four years old in the reign of Caracalla, being placed near the time of an emperor dead upwards of 110 years before. He conjectures (and his idea has since then been universally acquiesced in) that it was Elagabalus, slain A. D. 22, whom Aelian had attacked (V. H. praefat. p. 50). At the close of his work, Philostratus the biographer praises his powers in forensic, popular, and extemporaneous eloquence, in rhetorical exercises, and for his writings, and naming him with Nicagoras and Apsines, he says, ou)k e)me\ dei= gra/fein, kai\ ga\r a)\n kai\ a)pisthqei/hn w(s xarisa/menos, e)peidh\ fili/a moi pro\s au)tou\s h)=n. It has been held that this last cause infers the death of the Lemnian, previously to the finishing of
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), Philo'stratus or Philostratus the Lemnian (search)
you had attacked him in his lifetime; for only a man can assail a living tyrant, any one can when dead" (2.32.2). Vossius and others had fallen into the error of supposing that this tyrant was Domitian, but Perizonius pointed out the impossibility of a man who was twenty-four years old in the reign of Caracalla, being placed near the time of an emperor dead upwards of 110 years before. He conjectures (and his idea has since then been universally acquiesced in) that it was Elagabalus, slain A. D. 22, whom Aelian had attacked (V. H. praefat. p. 50). At the close of his work, Philostratus the biographer praises his powers in forensic, popular, and extemporaneous eloquence, in rhetorical exercises, and for his writings, and naming him with Nicagoras and Apsines, he says, ou)k e)me\ dei= gra/fein, kai\ ga\r a)\n kai\ a)pisthqei/hn w(s xarisa/menos, e)peidh\ fili/a moi pro\s au)tou\s h)=n. It has been held that this last cause infers the death of the Lemnian, previously to the finishing of
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Rufi'nus, C. Vi'bius consul suffectus in A. D. 22. (Fasti.)
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Scaurus, Aemi'lius 6. MAMERCUS AEMILIUS SCAURUS, the son of No. 5, was a distinguished orator and poet, but of a dissolute character. He was a member of the senate at the time of the accession of Tiberius, A. D. 14, when he offended this suspicious emperor by some remarks which he made in the senate. He is mentioned as one of the accusers of Domitius Corbulo in A. D. 21, and likewise as one of the accusers of Silanus, in A. D. 22. He was himself accused of majestas in A. D. 32, but Tiberius stopped the proceedings against him. He was, however, again accused of the same crime in A. D. 34, by Servilius and Cornelius Tuscus, who charged him with magic, and with having had adultery with Livia; but his real ground of offence was his tragedy of Atreus, in which his enemy Macro had interpolated some verses reflecting upon the emperor. He put an end to his own life at the suggestion of his wife Sextia, who killed herself at the same time (Tac. Ann. 1.13, 3.31, 36, 6.9, 29; D. C. 58.24; Senec.
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