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Browsing named entities in A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith). You can also browse the collection for 450 AD or search for 450 AD in all documents.

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and was eventually raised to the dignity of eparch, or governor of his native city; but being penetrated, we are told, with a deep feeling of the reality of divine things, he renounced his rank and dignities, and retired with his son Theodulus to a monastery on Mount Sinai, while his wife and daughter took refuge in a religious retreat in Egypt. His son is said to have perished in an attack made upon the convent by some barbarians; but Nilus himself escaped, and appears to have died about A. D. 450 or 451. Works Nilus was the author of many theological works, several of which have been printed, though they have not vet been collected into one edition. Photius gives extracts from some of his works. (Bibl. Cod. 276.) Of the various works of Nilus the most important are, 1. *Kefalaia h)\ *Paraine/seis containing advice on the way in which a Christian should live; in fact, a summary of practical divinity. 2. Letters for the most part on the same subject as the preceding work.
and was eventually raised to the dignity of eparch, or governor of his native city; but being penetrated, we are told, with a deep feeling of the reality of divine things, he renounced his rank and dignities, and retired with his son Theodulus to a monastery on Mount Sinai, while his wife and daughter took refuge in a religious retreat in Egypt. His son is said to have perished in an attack made upon the convent by some barbarians; but Nilus himself escaped, and appears to have died about A. D. 450 or 451. Works Nilus was the author of many theological works, several of which have been printed, though they have not vet been collected into one edition. Photius gives extracts from some of his works. (Bibl. Cod. 276.) Of the various works of Nilus the most important are, 1. *Kefalaia h)\ *Paraine/seis containing advice on the way in which a Christian should live; in fact, a summary of practical divinity. 2. Letters for the most part on the same subject as the preceding work.
of Roman literature. From the surname Caesariensis which is given to him, we gather that he was either born at Caesareia, or at least was educated there. The time at which he lived cannot be fixed with any great precision. He is spoken of as a contemporary of Cassiodorus, who lived from A. D. 468 to at least A. D. 562. (Paulus Diaconus, de Gest. Longob. 1.25.) According to a statement of Aldhelm (ap. Mai, Auct. Class. vol. v. p. 501, &c.), the emperor Theodosius the younger, who died in A. D. 450, copied out Priscian's grammatical work with his own hand. Some authorities, therefore, place him in the first half of the fifth century, others a little later in the same century, others in the beginning of the sixth century. The second is the only view at all consonant with both the above statements. Priscianus was a pupil of Theoctistus. (Prisc. 18.5.) He himself taught grammar at Constantinople, and was in the receipt of a salary from the government, from which (as well as from parts o
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), Priscus or Priscus Panites (search)
en. Works Account of Attila Priscus wrote an account of his embassy to Attila, enriched by digressions on the life and reign of that king, the Greek title of which is *(Istori/a *Bizantikh\ kai\ kata\ *)Atth/lai. which was originally divided into eight books, according to Suidas. This is the most valuable account we have on Attila, and it is deeply to be regretted that only fragments of it have come down to posterity : it was written after the death of Theodosius, which took place in A. D. 450. Priscus is an excellent and trustworthy historian, and his style is remarkably elegant and pure. *Meletai\ *(Rhtorikai/, Declamationes Rhetoricae Suidas says that he also wrote *Meletai\ *(Rhtorikai/, Declamationes Rhetoricae and Epistolae, which are lost. Impact Jornandes and Juvencus, the author of the Life of Attila, borrowed largely from the History of Priscus, whose name is often mentioned by them, as well as by other Byzantine writers, as, for instance, by Evagrius, who calls
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
449, and that Turcius Rufus Apronianus Asterius was consul along with Praesidius in A. D. 496. Combining these facts little doubt can be entertained that the latter is the person indicated above, and that we may fix the epoch of Sedulius about A. D. 450. Of his personal history we know nothing whatsoever. By Trithemius (l.c.) indeed he is said to have been a Scot, the disciple of archbishop Hildebert; but this and similar statements arose. it would appear, from confounding three different pershich is prefixed in some MSS. a "Praefatio," in eight elegiac couplets, addressed to the reader, and a " Dedicatio ad Theodosium Augustum," in fifteen hexameters. If the inscription of the latter be genuine, it could not have been written after A. D. 450, for in that year the younger Theodosius died. There is also an introductory epistle addressed to the Abbot Macedonius, at whose request Sedulius had executed a prose version of the above poem. This prose version has been preserved and was publ
of Leo and the Western bishops; at the same time he requested to be advised whether he should submit to his deposition. Leo, who had already pronounced against the Eutychians, accepted Theodoret's confession of faith as satisfactory, and declared him absolved from all ecclesiastical censure : but the proposal for an oecumenical council in Italy was negatived by the emperor. At this precise juncture, however, the whole state of affairs was suddenly changed by the death of Theodosius II., A. D. 450, and the accession of Pulcheria and Marcianus, who were unfavourable to the Eutychians. Theodoret and the other deposed bishops were recalled from retirement, on the condition that they should be reinstated in their sees by the decision of an oecumenical council; and Theodoret himself joined in the demand for such a council, as necessary to restore peace to the Church. It assembled, first at Nicaea, and afterwards at Chalcedon, in A. D. 451. At its eighth session the petition of Theodoret
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), Theodo'sius II. or Theodo'sius the Younger or the Younger Theodo'sius (search)
igilius. But he sent two ambassadors to Constantinople, who boldly rebuked the emperor for his guilt, and demanded the head of Chrysaphius. Instead of directly refusing the demand, Theodosius sent a fresh embassy, loaded with presents, to deprecate the wrath of Attila, who preferring gold to vengeance, pardoned the emperor and his guilty associates : he even abandoned all claim to the country south of the Danube; but here his liberality was not great, for he had made it a desert. In June A. D. 450, Theodosius was thrown from his horse as he was hunting near Constantinople, and received an injury from which he died, in the fiftieth year of his age and the forty-second of his long and inglorious reign. His sister Pulcheria succeeded him, but prudently took for her colleague in the empire the senator Marcian, and made him her husband. Works Codex Theodosianus In the reign of Theodosius, and that of Valentinian III., who was emperor of the West from A. D. 425 to 455, was made the c
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
roads and the walls of the towns and all other imposts. In A. D. 442 Valentinian made peace with the Vandals, who were left in undisturbed possession of part of Africa. In A. D. 446, the Romans abandoned Britain. The Picts and Scots were ravaging the country, and the Britons in vain applied for help to Aetius who was then consul. A revolt took place in Armorica in A. D. 448 which was however soon settled. Ravenna was the ordinary residence of the emperor ; but he went to Rome early in A. D. 450 with his wife and mother, when by a constitution, dated the 5th of March, he remitted all the taxes that had become due up to the 1st of September A. D. 448; from which we may conclude that the people were unable to pay them. Sardinia and Africa were excepted from this indulgence. The emperor spoke of the exactions of the commissioners who were sent into the provinces to prevent the exactions of others; they enriched themselves at the expence both of the tax-payers and of the Fiscus. Oppre
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), Vince'ntius or Vince'ntius Lirinensis (search)
Vince'ntius or Vince'ntius Lirinensis surnamed LIRINENSIS, from the celebrated monastery in the island of Lerins, where he officiated as a presbyter, was by birth a native of Gaul. We are not acquainted with any particulars regarding his career, except that he died in the reign of Theodosius and Valentinian, about A. D. 450. Works Commonitorium pro Catholicae fidei antiquitate et universitate adversus profanas omnium Haereticorum novitates Vincentius' fame rests upon a treatise against heretics, composed, as we are told in the body of the work itself, three years after the council of Ephesus, that is, in A. D. 434. It commonly bears the title Commonitorium pro Catholicae fidei antiquitate et universitate adversus profanas omnium Haereticorum novitates, but according to Gennadius, when first published, it did not exhibit the name of the writer, and was designated Peregrinii. e. the Pilgrim adversus Haereticos. We are farther told that it was originally divided into two parts, b
Zacharias (*Zaxari/as). 1. An ecclesiastical writer, commonly known by the name of ZACHARIAS RHETOR. He was bishop of Melitene, and was the author of an ecclesiastical history embracing the period from A. D. 450 to A. D. 491. In the judgment of the orthodox Evagrius this work was written with a bias in favour of the Nestorians. (Evagrius, 2.2, 3.5, 6, 7, 18; comp. Nicephorus, 16.5, 6, 9, &c.) A Syriac translation, which bears no author's name, is claimed as the translation of the work of Zacharias by Assemann (Bibl. Orient. vol. ii. p. 53, &c.; comp. Le Quien, Oriens Christ i. p. 442
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