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Browsing named entities in A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith). You can also browse the collection for 70 AD or search for 70 AD in all documents.

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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Briga'nticus, Ju'lius was born among the Batavi, and was the son of the sister of Civilis, who hated and was in turn hated by his nephew. Briganticus commanded a squadron of cavalry, with which he first revolted to Caecina, the general of Vitellius, and afterwards to Vespasian, in A. D. 70. He served under Cerialis in Germany against his uncle Civilis, and fell in battle in this war, A. D. 71. (Tac. Hist. 2.22, 4.70, 5.21.)
Brinno a German of noble birth, was chosen leader of his people, the Canninefates, in their attack upon the Romans in A. D. 70. (Tac. Hist. 4.15.)
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Burdo, Ju'lius commander of the fleet in Germany, A. D. 70, was obnoxious to the soldiers, because it was thought that he had had a hand in the death of Fonteius Capito; but he was protected by Vitellius from the vengeance of the soldiers. (Tac. Hist. 1.58.)
S. Cerea'lis a Roman general, commanded the fifth legion in the Jewish war, under Titus. (A. D. 70.) He slew a number of Samaritans on mount Gerizim; overran Idumaea, and took Hebron; made an unsuccessful night attack on the temple, and was present at the council of war held by Titus immediately before the taking of Jerusalem. (Joseph. B.J. 3.7.32, 4.9. § 9, 6.2. §§ 5,6; 100.4.3.) [P
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Civi'lis, Clau'dius was the leader of the Batavi in their revolt from Rome, A. D. 69-70. The Batavi were a people of Germanic origin, who had left the nation of the Catti, of which they were a part, and had settled in and about the island which is formed by the mouths of the Rhenus (Rhine) and Mesa (Maas). The important position which they occupied led the Romans to cultivate their friendship, and they rendered good service to Rome in the wars in Germany and Britain, under the early emperors. Wested Vetera Castra, and took Gelduba. The Romans, paralyzed by new dissensions [HORDEONIUS FLACCUS; VOCULA], suffered another defeat from Civilis; but some of them, rallying under Vocula, retook Magontiacum. At the beginning of the new year (A. D. 70), the war assumed a fresh and more formidable character. The news of the death of Vitellius exasperated the Roman soldiers, encouraged the insurgents, and shook the fidelity of the Gauls; while a rumour was moreover circulated that the winter qu
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Cla'ssicus, Julius a Trevir, was prefect of an ala of the Treviri in the Roman army on the Rhine, under Vitellius, A. D. 69 (Tac. Hist. 2.14), and afterwards joined Civilis at the head of some of the Treviri in his rebellion against the Romans, A. D. 70. During the first part of the war with Civilis, the Treviri, like the rest of Gaul, remained firm to the Romans. They even fortified their borders, and opposed the Germans in great battles. (Tac. Hist. 4.37.) But when the news of Vitellius's death reached Gaul (A. D. 70), there arose a rumour that the chiefs of Gaul had secretly taken an oath to avail themselves of the civil discords of Rome for the recovery of their independence. There was, however, no open sign of rebellion till after the death of HORDEONIUS FLACCUS, when messengers began to pass between Civilis and Classicus, who was still commanding an ala of Trcvirans in the army of Vocula. He was descended from a family of royal blood and of renown both in peace and war, and thro
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Clemens Arreti'nus a man of Senatorial rank, connected by marriage with the family of Vespasian, and an intimate friend of Domitian, was appointed by Mucianus praefect of the praetorian guards in A. D. 70, a dignity which his father had formerly held under Caligula. (Tac. Ann. 4.68.) Clemens probably did not hold this command long, and the appointment of Mucianus may have been regarded as altogether void, as Suetonius says (Tib. 6), that Titus was the first senator who was praefect of the praetorians, the office being up to that time filled by a knight. Notwithstanding, however, the friendship of Domitian with Clemens, he was one of the victims of the cruelty of this emperor when he ascended the throne. (Suet. Dom. 11.)
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Densus, Sempro'nius a most distinguished and noble-minded man of the time of the emperor Galba. He was centurion of a praetorian cohort, and was commissioned by Galba to protect his adopted son Piso Licinianus, at the time when the insurrection against Galba broke out, A. D. 70. When the rebels approached to seek and murder Piso, Densus rushed out against them with his sword drawn, and thus turned the attention of the persecutors towards himself, so that Piso had an opportunity of escaping, though he was afterwards caught and put to death. (Tac. Hist. 1.43.) According to Dio Cassius (64.6) and Plutarch (Plut. Galb. 26) it was not Piso, but Galba himself who was thus defended and protected by Densus, who fell during the struggle. [L.S]
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Felix, Sexti'lius was stationed, A. D. 70, on the frontiers of Raetia by Antonius Primus to watch the movements of Porcius Septiminus, procurator of that province under Vitellius. Felix remained in Raetia until the following year, when he assisted in quelling an insurrection of the Treviri. (Tac. Hist. 3.5, 4.70.) [W.B.D]
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Fronti'nus, Sex. Julius of whose origin and early career we know nothing, first appears in history under Vespasian, at the beginning of A. D. 70, as praetor urbanus, an office which he speedily resigned in order to make way for Domitian, and it is probable that he was one of the consules suffecti in A. D. 74. In the course of the following year he succeeded Cerealis as governor of Britain, where he distinguished himself by the conquest of the Silures, and maintained the Roman power unbroken until superseded by Agricola in A. D. 78. In the third consulship of Nerva (A. D. 97) Frontinus was nominated curator aquarum, an appointment never conferred, as he himself informs us, except upon the leading men of the state (de Aq. 1; comp. 102); he also enjoyed the high dignity of augur, and his death must have happened about A. D. 106, since his seat in the college was bestowed upon the younger Pliny soon after that period. From an epigram in Martial we might conclude that he was twice elevated
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