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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 20: Peace conference at Hampton Roads.--the campaign against Richmond. (search)
dawn, the City was a pandemonium. Here and there stores were set on fire. The roaring mob released the prisoners from the jail and burned it. They set fire to the arsenal, and tried to destroy the Tredegar iron works. see page 36, volume II. many buildings, said General Ewell, were fired by the mob, which I had carefully directed should be spared. Thus the arsenal was destroyed against My orders. A party of men who proceeded to burn the Tredegar iron works, were only deterred by General Anderson's arming his employees and threatening resistance. The small bridge on Fourteenth Street, over the canal, was burnt by incendiaries, who fired a barge above and pushed it against the bridge. --Ewell's letter to the author. Early in the morning, one of the large Mills on the borders of the River was set on fire; and at about the same time, the doomed warehouses burst into flames. General Ewell said: I left the City about seven in the morning, and, as yet, nothing had been fired by My
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 21: closing events of the War.--assassination of the President. (search)
ed from the War Department, which had been approved by General Grant, putting an end to all drafting and recruiting for the National army, and the purchase of munitions of war and, supplies; and declaring that the number of general and staff officers would be speedily reduced, and all military restrictions on trade and commerce be removed forthwith. This virtual proclamation of the end of the war went over the land on the anniversary of the evacuation of Fort Sumter, April 14. while General Anderson was replacing the old flag over the ruins of that fortress. See page 465. Preparations for a National thanksgiving were a-making, and the atmosphere of the Republic, so to speak, was radiant with sunlight, when a dark cloud appeared, and suddenly overspread the firmament as with a pall. Before midnight the electric messengers went over the land with the tidings that the President had been murdered! The sad story may be briefly told as follows:-- On the morning of the 14th, Gener
h her independence firmly, in a very brief space of time, is persevere in her present habit of whipping the Yankees. A Tupelo correspondent of the Mobile Advertiser says letters have been received from Washington, one at Mayfield, Ky. from Lucien Anderson, Congressman from that district, and the other at Dresden, Tenn, from the notorious Emerson Etheridge, saying that hostilities would cease next month; or, at all events armistice would be proposed, and begging their respective friends to us letters have been received from Washington, one at Mayfield, Ky. from Lucien Anderson, Congressman from that district, and the other at Dresden, Tenn, from the notorious Emerson Etheridge, saying that hostilities would cease next month; or, at all events armistice would be proposed, and begging their respective friends to use their utmost endeavor to have those States go with the North, Etheridge says, "We are whipped," and Anderson that "the present Congress will recognize the Confederacy."
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