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other books that have endeared her to millions of readers. Her diary of 1862 contains this characteristic note: November. Thirty years old. Decided to go to Washington as a nurse if I could find a place. Help needed, and I love nursing and must let out my pent — up energy in some new way. She had not yet attained fame as a writer, but it was during this time that she wrote for a newspaper the letters afterwards collected as Hospital Sketches. It is due to the courtesy of Messrs. Little, Brown & Company of Boston that the wartime portrait is here reproduced. An afternoon concert at the officers' quarters, Harewood hospital, near Washington Louisa M. Alcott, the author of little women, as a nurse in 1862 Nashville, and there Doctor Stout himself, before his promotion, was placed in charge of the Gordon Hospital, formerly an old warehouse. This hospital had been in charge of a committee of ladies who had employed civilian physicians to attend the sick, and the hospital a
other books that have endeared her to millions of readers. Her diary of 1862 contains this characteristic note: November. Thirty years old. Decided to go to Washington as a nurse if I could find a place. Help needed, and I love nursing and must let out my pent — up energy in some new way. She had not yet attained fame as a writer, but it was during this time that she wrote for a newspaper the letters afterwards collected as Hospital Sketches. It is due to the courtesy of Messrs. Little, Brown & Company of Boston that the wartime portrait is here reproduced. An afternoon concert at the officers' quarters, Harewood hospital, near Washington Louisa M. Alcott, the author of little women, as a nurse in 1862 Nashville, and there Doctor Stout himself, before his promotion, was placed in charge of the Gordon Hospital, formerly an old warehouse. This hospital had been in charge of a committee of ladies who had employed civilian physicians to attend the sick, and the hospital a
but the master and his papers were soon brought on board, when it appeared that our prize was the ship Montmorency, of Bath, Maine, from Newport, in Wales, and bound to St. Thomas, with a cargo of coal, for the English mail-steamers rendezvousing at that island. Her cargo being properly documented, as English property, we could not destroy her, but put her under a ransom bond, for her supposed value, and released her. We received on board from her, however, some cordage and paints; and Captain Brown was civil enough to send me on board, with his compliments, some bottles of port wine and a box of excellent cigars. The master and crew were parolled, not to serve against the Confederate States during the war, unless exchanged. I began, now, to find that the Yankee masters, mates, and sailors rather liked being parolled; they would sometimes remind us of it, if they thought we were in danger of forgetting it. It saved them from being conscripted, unless the enemy was willing first
William Hepworth Dixon, White Conquest: Volume 1, Chapter 6: White conquerors. (search)
Chapter 6: White conquerors. guess you'll say here's a place, whispers Colonel Brown, a settler in these parts. If this valley had a little more rain, a little more soil, and a little less the range, when the old boatman stopped in the middle of his passage, and enquired my name. Mister Brown, said I. Mister Brown? said lhe, resting on his oars, evidently puzzled in his head. What nMister Brown? said lhe, resting on his oars, evidently puzzled in his head. What name, stranger? he inquired once more. Mister Brown. He looked distressed, but said no more until I stepped on shore and offered him his fare. Excuse me, sir, he cut in quickly, I cannot take your mMister Brown. He looked distressed, but said no more until I stepped on shore and offered him his fare. Excuse me, sir, he cut in quickly, I cannot take your money. Keep it in memory of this remarkable day. Boy and man, I have kept this ferry on the San Joaquin River for twenty-two. years, and you are positively the first person named Mister, whom I have had the pleasure to put across. On that date I commissioned myself as Colonel Brown. Come, Colonel, bet you don't beat this place in the old country, nohow? Yet Salinas is an English town. Ca
William Hepworth Dixon, White Conquest: Volume 1, Chapter 24: White vendetta. (search)
trocity the blood feuds of the two Cherokee factions in Vinta between Stand Watie and Jack Ross. Colonel Sisney and George Bulliner were neighbours, living on adjoining farms, near Carterville. Sisney had a farm of three hundred and sixty acres, Bulliner a farm, a saw mill, and a woollen mill. Sisney, a native of the country, had served in the war, and gained the rank of captain. How he obtained the grade of colonel, no one seems to know; he may have been commissioned in the way of Colonel Brown. Bulliner was a new comer, who had left Tennessee, his native state, during the civil war. Sisney had three sons, the eldest of whom, John, was married. Bulliner had sons named Jack and Dave, and a younger brother, David, who had a son called George. Sisney and Bulliner were more or less intimate with all the settlers living round them; Sisney with the Russells and Hendersons, Bulliner with the Hinchcliffes and Cranes. Not far off lived a family named Stocks, in which were three yo
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac, chapter 9 (search)
ridge along the left and left centre, on which it was manifest the attack was to fall, with eighty guns—a number not as great as that of the enemy, but it was all that could be made effective in the more restricted space occupied by the army. In the cemetery were placed Dilger's, Bancroft's, Eakin's, Wheeler's, Hill's, and Taft's batteries, under Major Osborne. On the left of the cemetery the batteries of the Second Corps, under Captain Hazard—namely, those of Woodruff, Arnold, Cushing, Brown, and Rorty. Next on the left was Thomas's battery, and on his left Major McGilvray's command, consisting of Thompson's, Phillips', Hart's, Sterling's, Ranks', Dow's, and Ames' of the reserve artillery, to which was added Cooper's battery of the First Corps. On the extreme left, Gibbs' and Rittenhouse's (late Hazlitt's) batteries. As batteries expended their ammunition, they were replaced by batteries of the artillery reserve, sent forward by its efficient chief, Colonel R. O. Tyler. Withh
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac, chapter 11 (search)
very vigorous assault on the two remaining brigades, under Colonels Brooke and Brown. He, however, met so deadly and determined a fire from these fine brigades thadivision in two lines of masses-Brooke's and Miles' brigades in the first line, Brown's and Smythe's brigades in the second line, each regiment forming double columneing a single brigade of Wilcox's divison of Hill's corps, under command of Colonel Brown. But this was soon re-enforced by the three other brigades of the divisionontinuing to hold three brigades on Griffin's front, detached the brigade under Brown to make an assault in flank. The manner of execution of this movement I had on the spot from Colonel Brown himself, who, as will be seen, was in a few minutes taken prisoner. Marching in column up the railroad for some distance, that brigadeunder Lieutenant-Colonel McCoy), in marching up by the flank, ran plump against Brown's column, which was moving to follow up its first advantage against the right.
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), chapter 30 (search)
4, II. 103, 104, 105, 106, 107, 116, 120, 126, 130, 133, 134, 135, 137, 139 and note, 355; letter from, L 311. Broglie, Victor Duc de, I. 128, 139, 151, 155, 253, 257 note, 263, 312, 314, II. 103, 104, 105, 107, 108, 110, 129, 130, 181, 133, 134, 139, 143, 145, 354, 35, 356, 369. Brookline, I. 385, II 457. Brooks, Edward, I. 154, 156, 158. Brooks, Shirley, II. 264 note, 256 note. Brosius, Dr., I. 11. Brougham, Henry Lord, I. 266, 279, II. 160, 151, 175, 176, 178, 193, 371. Brown, Dr., I. 280 and note. Bruen, Rev. M., I. 364 note. Bruess, Countess, I 154. Brunet, G., II. 255 and note. Brunetti, Count, II. 38. Brussels, visits, I. 450, II. 311, 313, 328. Buckland, Dr., I. 404-406, 11.168, 169, 176. Buckle, W. H., II. 255 and note; civilization in Europe, 410. Buckminster, Miss, Eliza, I. 331, 377 note. Buckminster, Miss, Lucy, I. 9 and note, 10. Buckminster, Rev. Joseph S., I. 8, 9, 17; death of, 10; G. T. in charge of his papers, 10 note.
James Russell Lowell, Among my books, Keats. (search)
again, and it was decided that he should go to Italy. He was accompanied thither by his friend, Mr. Severn, an artist. After embarking, he wrote to his friend, Mr. Brown. We give a part of this letter, which is so deeply tragic that the sentences we take almost seem to break away from the rest with a cry of anguish, like the bras sort of suffering. To the same friend he writes again from Naples, 1st November, 1820:— The persuasion that I shall see her no more will kill me. My dear Brown, I should have had her when I was in health, and I should have remained well. I can bear to die,— I cannot bear to leave her. O God! God! God! Everything I have eive a letter from her,— to see her handwriting would break my heart. Even to hear of her anyhow, to see her name written, would be more than I can bear. My dear Brown, what am I to do? Where can I look for consolation or ease? If I had any chance of recovery, this passion would kill me. Indeed, through the whole of my illness,<
Margaret Fuller, Memoirs of Margaret Fuller Ossoli (ed. W. H. Channing), chapter 1 (search)
ays do in the afternoon, when possible, I devote to you the hours which Ariosto and Helvetius ask of my eyes,—as, lying on my writing-desk, they put me in mind that they must return this week to their owner. You keep me to my promise of giving you some sketch of my pursuits. I rise a little before five, walk an hour, and then practise on the piano, till seven, when we breakfast. Next I read French,—Sismondi's Literature of the South of Europe,— till eight, then two or three lectures in Brown's Philosophy. About halfpast nine I go to Mr. Perkins's school and study Greek till twelve, when, the school being dismissed, I recite, go home, and practise again till dinner, at two. Sometimes, if the conversation is very agreeable, I lounge for half an hour over the dessert, though rarely so lavish of time. Then, when I can, I read two hours in Italian, but I am often interrupted. At six, I walk, or take a drive. Before going to bed, I play or sing, for half an hour or so, to make al<
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