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John Harrison Wilson, The life of Charles Henry Dana, Chapter 2: education (search)
ad to see, in your account of miscellaneous reading, authors of such inoppugnable orthodoxy as Coleridge and Carlyle. To Coleridge, though I have read but a moiety of his writings, I look up as to aColeridge, though I have read but a moiety of his writings, I look up as to a spiritual father; to me he is a teacher of wisdom. Apropos of Carlyle, in a recent letter to Mr. Emerson he says, that in preparing a second edition of the History of the French Revolution for the h, as knowing people who hear them say, are beautiful and profound. Mr. Dana is a disciple of Coleridge in philosophy. Dr. Walker is to deliver a course of twelve lectures on Natural Theology at th and acuteness I have great respect. When I have read I may receive it also. Have you read Coleridge? If not, let me once more advise you to do so. If you can get hold of The Friend I advise youas lately published a book on Emancipation, which is fully worthy of him, and a little book of Coleridge's, called Confessions of an Inquiring Spirit, has lately been republished. As for my own re
John Harrison Wilson, The life of Charles Henry Dana, Chapter 3: community life (search)
by study, reflection, and composition. Surely and steadily the idealist and dreamer was laying down his illusions and taking up the methods of a practical business-man. He was then, and remained throughout his life, devoted to idealism, poetry, and romance, but never after that time did he allow either to lead him away from the practical duties of the hour. It is worthy of passing notice that Dana for a part of this period also kept a book of quotations which abounds in extracts from Coleridge, Longfellow, Wordsworth, Carlyle, Motherwell, Cousin, Considerant, Fourier, Schiller, Goethe, Spinoza, Heine, Herman, Kepler, Bruno, Novalis, Bohme, Swedenborg, Virgil, Horace, Cicero, Thucydides, Euripides, and Sallust. It is still more worthy of notice that they were made always in the script and language in which they were written, whether it was English, German, French, Spanish, Portuguese, Italian, Danish, Latin, or Greek. These extracts consist of lofty thoughts and sentiments, wh
John Harrison Wilson, The life of Charles Henry Dana, Appendix: Brook Farm — an address delivered at the University of Michigan on Thursday, January 21, 1895: (search)
longer possessed the fine library that he had previous to our experiment; it was sold to pay off the creditors. We were all proud of the fact, though he never spoke of it. And in a general way our experience was duplicated by the other associations or phalanxes. Without our special misfortune they all came to a similar end. I don't know of one of them that lasted till 1860. That is the story of the socialist movement of that day, and it certainly went far beyond the dreams with which Coleridge and Southey and their friends are said to have entertained their youth a hundred years before. We may say that, as a reform of society, the movement accomplished nothing. But what it did accomplish was a great deal of good for those who were concerned in it and no great loss for any of those who furnished money. Still the questions remain: Is the theory sound? Is that sort of social reform practicable? Fourier said it was, and that in the revolutions of time it would be brought about
John Harrison Wilson, The life of Charles Henry Dana, Index (search)
orcelains, 503-505. Chorpenning claim, 425. Chronotype, Daily, 59, 63. Cicero, 56. Citico Creek, 291. Clark, Bayard, 144. Clay, Clement C,, 359, 360. Clay, Henry, 98, 115, 152. Clayton, Senator, 142, 145. Cleveland, Grover, 460, 462, 465, 469, 472, 475, 480, 483, 490. Codman, J. T., 45. Coffee Club of Buffalo, 10, 29. Coffee, Titian J., 427. Cold Harbor, 320, 322-329. Coldwater River, 207. Collamer, Senator, 153. Collector of Customs, 407. Collins line, 131. Coleridge, 21, 26-28, 56. Colored troops, 235. Columbus, Tennessee, 204. Commerce, editorial on, 51. Commercial Advertiser, 62. Comstock, Colonel, 325, 352. Concord, Massachusetts, 26. Conkling, Roscoe, 45, 195, 357. Considerant, Victor, 56, 66, 136. Consolidation of military departments, Mississippi Valley, 267, 268. Continental Union Association, 477. Cooper, 47. Corbin's Bridge, 319. Corinto affair, 471. Cornell, Alonzo B., Surveyor of Port of New York, 413. Corpora
William Alexander Linn, Horace Greeley Founder and Editor of The New York Tribune, Chapter 5: sources of the Tribune's influence — Greeley's personality (search)
tarted when, in the words of John Morley, a great wave of humanity, of benevolence, of desire for improvement — a great wave of social sentiment, in short-poured itself among all who had the faculty of large and disinterested thinking ; a day when Pusey and Thomas Arnold, Carlyle and Dickens, Cobden and O'Connell, were arousing new interest in old subjects; when the communistic experiments in Brazil and Owen's project at Hopedale inspired expectation of social improvement; when Southey and Coleridge meditated a migration to the shores of America to assist in the foundation of an ideal society, and when philosophers on the continent of Europe were believing that things dreamed of were at last to be realized. Greeley's mind was naturally receptive of new plans for reform — a tendency inherited, perhaps, from his New England place of birth, that land in which every ism of social or religious life has had its origin. The hard experience of his own family, as he shared it in his early bo
Chapter 1: True value of the Federal principle. historical examples. Coleridge's prophecy. Early mission of the American Union. how terminated. the American system of Government a mixed one. the Colonial period. first proposition of a General Congress. declaration of Independence. articles of Confederation. their occasion and origin. nature of the compact. peace-treaty of 1783. analysis of the nature and value of the Confederation. how it was terminated. the Conventit the members of a confederation, after they have advanced in political life and become mature and powerful, should desire for themselves independence and free action, and be impatient of a system founded on their early and past necessities! Coleridge, the acute English scholar and philosopher, once said that he looked upon the American States as splendid masses to be used by and by in the composition of two or three great governments. For more than a generation past it was considered by a
lection of himself. On a matter so irresistibly clear, authority is superfluous; but an eminent character, who as poet makes us forget his high place as philosopher, and as philosopher, makes us forget his high place as theologian, has exposed the essential antagonism between Christianity and Slavery, in a few pregnant words which you will be glad to hear,—particularly as, I believe, they have not been before introduced into this discussion. By a principle essential to Christianity, says Coleridge, a person is eternally differenced from a thing; so that the idea of a Human Being necessarily excludes the idea of property in that Being. With regret, though not with astonishment, I learn that a Boston divine has sought to throw the seamless garment of Christ over this shocking wrong. But I am patient, and see clearly how vain will be his effort, when I call to mind, that, within this very century, other divines sought to throw the same seamless garment over the more shocking slave-
lection of himself. On a matter so irresistibly clear, authority is superfluous; but an eminent character, who as poet makes us forget his high place as philosopher, and as philosopher, makes us forget his high place as theologian, has exposed the essential antagonism between Christianity and Slavery, in a few pregnant words which you will be glad to hear,—particularly as, I believe, they have not been before introduced into this discussion. By a principle essential to Christianity, says Coleridge, a person is eternally differenced from a thing; so that the idea of a Human Being necessarily excludes the idea of property in that Being. With regret, though not with astonishment, I learn that a Boston divine has sought to throw the seamless garment of Christ over this shocking wrong. But I am patient, and see clearly how vain will be his effort, when I call to mind, that, within this very century, other divines sought to throw the same seamless garment over the more shocking slave-
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1, chapter 13 (search)
d to steal. [Loud applause.] This Broad-Church reformer knows his place so little, that he sneers at spiritualism and socialism, as vices entitled to no terms. One, an honest effort, however mistaken, to make all men wholly and really brothers in life, property, and thought; and the other, that reaching into the land of spirit which has stirred the heart and roused the brain of the best men of all ages, and given to literature its soul. Does he give no heed to that profound maxim of Coleridge,--There are errors which no wise man will treat with rudeness while there is a probability that they may be the refraction of some great truth still below the horizon ? Yes, this Broad Church !--humanity would weep if it ever came, for one of its doctrines is, that the statute-book is more binding than the Sermon on the Mount, and that the rights of private judgment are a curse. Save us from a Church not broad enough to cover woman and the slave, all the room being kept for the grog-sh
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1, chapter 19 (search)
pendence. [Laughter.] To merchant, independence meant only direct trade,--to planter, cheating his creditors. Present conflict of interests is another instrument of progress. Religious persecution planted these States; commercial persecution brought about the Revolution; John Bull's perseverance in a seven-years war fused us into one nation; his narrow and ill-tempered effort to govern us by stealth, even after the peace of 1783, drove us to the Constitution of 1789. I think it was Coleridge who said, if he were a clergyman in Cornwall, he should preach fifty-two sermons a year against wreckers. In the same spirit, I shall find the best illustration of our progress in the history of the slave question. Some men sit sad and trembling for the future, because the knell of this Union has sounded. But the heavens are almost all bright; and if some sable clouds linger on the horizon, they have turned their silver linings almost wholly to our sight. Every man who possesses his
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