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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 6: fiction I — Brown, Cooper. (search)
Chapter 6: fiction I — Brown, Cooper. Carl Van Doren, Ph.D., Head Master of The Brearley School, Associate in English in Columbia University. The novel in n. Edgar Huntly. Isaac Mitchell. Tabitha Tenney. Samuel Woodworth. James Fenimore Cooper. youth. naval career. Precaution. the spy. the pioneers. the pilor border tales. the Pathfinder. the Deerslayer. the Littlepage manuscripts. Cooper's rank as a romancer The clear victory which the first great British noveliste in American fiction between the close of Brown's career and the beginning of Cooper's. An absurd romance, The Asylum (1811), probably by Isaac Mitchell, was populae a Scott. Seldom has time contradicted a prophet so fully and so soon as when Cooper, within three years, began to show that democracy has its contrasts, that two hone of the great chapters in the world's romance. The task weighed less upon Cooper than it might had he been from boyhood at all bookish or, when he began his car
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index. (search)
101, 249, 257 Conrad, Robert T., 222, 224 Considerations on behalf of the colonies, etc., 129 Considerations on the nature and the extent of the legislative authority of the British Parliament, 135 Considerations on the propriety of imposing taxes in the British colonies, etc., 130 Contemplations, 155 Contrast, the, 218, 219, 220, 227, 229, 232 Contrat social, 102, 119 Cook, Captain, 186 Cool thoughts on the present situation, etc., 98 Coombe, Thomas, 163 Cooper, J. Fenimore, 187, 208, 209, 231, 232, 276, 292, 293-306, 307, 308, 309, 31o, 311, 314, 36, 317, 318, 319, 320,322,324,325 Cooper, Myles, 138 Cooper, Thomas, 202 Cooper, Judge, William, 293, 294 Coquette, the, 285, 286 Cornwallis, 144, 145 Cortez, 287, 319 Cotton, Rev.John, 21, 35-38, 43,50, 158 Count Julian, 317 Countryman, Letters of A, 148 Courier (Charleston), 237 Court of fancy, the, 176 Cousin, Victor, 332 Cowley, 112, 177 Cowper, 166, 178 n., 180,
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature, Chapter 4: the New York period (search)
y novels. It was with her and her alone, that Cooper at the outset had to compete. James Fenimore Cooper. James Fenimore Cooper was born in 1789, the year of Washington's inauguration and thebook appeared just twenty years afterward, and Cooper's eleven years later still. It took that muchbility and his injudicious zeal about trifles, Cooper undoubtedly possessed disinterestedness and nonever yet devised an inexplosive gunpowder. Cooper's personal unpopularity did not prevent his no the American romancer. Cooper's novels. Cooper's childhood was spent at Cooperstown, N. Y., t are of course the most famous. Like Scott, Cooper was less successful with his heroes and heroin interpretation of Indian character, moreover, Cooper discerned the presence of a poetic element whiary landscape painters. He says elsewhere: If Cooper had succeeded in the painting of character to e whole New York school, apart from Irving and Cooper, has undergone a reaction in fame, a reaction [16 more...]
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature, Chapter 5: the New England period — Preliminary (search)
because neither reached ignorant readers so well, or created such a demand for itself. For this reason especial pains have been taken by the Museum to collect all versions. It must be remembered that the tale had the immense advantage, as had Cooper's novels before it, of introducing to the world a race of human beings whom it had practically ignored. The book had also, as the writings of Cooper had not, the advantage of a distinctly evangelical flavor. How much weight has been carried in Cooper had not, the advantage of a distinctly evangelical flavor. How much weight has been carried in other cases by this last quality may be seen in the immense circulation of such tales as Ingraham's Prince of the house of David in the last generation, and Wallace's Ben Hur in the present, both marked by this attribute. Indeed, Mrs. Browning herself subsequently writes of so mediocre a book as Queechy, which partakes of this quality, that Mrs. Beecher Stowe scarcely exceeds it, after all the trumpets. After all reservations have been made, after we have admitted that the method is too pla
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature, Chapter 8: the Southern influence---Whitman (search)
imms. There were, however, three or four antebellum writers who attempted to give literary expression to the Southern life or the Southern spirit. The first of them in point of time was William Gilmore Simms. He was in some respects akin to Cooper; a writer of robust temper, a talent for narrative, and an eye for the picturesque in Southern history. He was, however, even less a finished artist than Cooper, and not one of his many romances has gained a sure place in literature. His work aCooper, and not one of his many romances has gained a sure place in literature. His work as a whole affords an interesting picture, but not a great picture, of Southern life and manners. Hayne and Timrod. Simms was born, and lived for most of his life, in Charleston, which was also the native city of the two poets, Hayne and Timrod, who, apart from Lanier and Poe, are now best known among Southern poets. Paul Hamilton Hayne's poetry is neither markedly Southern nor markedly original. It has a certain smoothness and elegance, but lacks force. A few lines from The Mocking bird
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature, Chapter 9: the Western influence (search)
positively that this nation could never have a great literature because no people had ever possessed one unless living within easy reach of the ocean. Time has shown that a vast inland country has also its resources and its stimulus; as, indeed, Cooper long ago indicated by naming one of his earliest novels The Prairie. Such a field must of course develop physically before it develops intellectually; and commonly artistic development comes later still. Only a century ago three fourths of the lso who wrote from Cincinnati to the London Athenaeum and had his books translated into French. These books, with those of Peter Parley (sometimes written by Hawthorne), gave a most vivid charm to the Western wilds and rivers. In The pioneers Cooper made us already conscious citizens of a great nation, and took our imagination as far as the Mississippi. Lewis and Clark carried us beyond the Mississippi (1814). About 1835 Oregon expeditions were forming, and I remember when boys in New Engl
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature, Chapter 10: forecast (search)
not write Hamlet at the dinner table. It is of course impossible to explain this to foreigners, and they still talk of composing, while we talk of dining. Transatlantic opinion. If the judgment of another nation is, as it has been called, that of a contemporary posterity, it is worth while to consider what sort of American literary product has excited the widest interest abroad. The greatest transatlantic successes of this kind which American novelists have yet attained-those won by Cooper and Mrs. Stowe--have come through a daring Americanism of subject, which introduced in each case a new figure to the European world,first the Indian, then the negro. Whatever the merit of the work, it was plainly the theme which conquered. Bret Harte's popularity in England is due to the same cause; and there are other instances which come readily to mind. Such successes are little likely to be repeated, for they were based on temporary situations, never to recur. The mere oddities or e
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature, A Glossary of Important Contributors to American Literature (search)
nington, Vt., Oct. 2, 1842. Channing, William Ellery 2d Nephew of the foregoing, and son of Walter Channing, M. D. Born in Boston. Entered Harvard in Lowell's class (1838), but did not graduate. He lived for most of his life in Concord, Mass. He published two volumes of poems, in 1843 and in 1847; and several other volumes of verse in subsequent years. His principal prose works are Thoreau, the poet Naturalist (1873) ; and Conversations from Rome, first published in 1902. Cooper, James Fenimore Born in Burlington, N. J., Sept. 15, 1789, of Quaker and Swedish descent. His early life was spent in the then wilderness of New York, and after a short time at Yale he entered the navy, where he remained for about three years. The interesting descriptions which we have in his works are founded on his early life in the wilderness and at sea. His first novel, Precaution, appeared in 1820. He was a prolific writer, and is, perhaps, best known by his Leather-Stocking tales, which a
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature, chapter 13 (search)
arner's Washington Irving, in American men of letters series, 1881. T. R. Lounsbury's James Fenimore Cooper, in American men of letters series, 1883. P. Godwin's Life of Bryant, 2 vols., D. Appe William Curtis, in American men of letters series, 1894. (B) Good editions of Irving and Cooper are so numerous as to need no specification. The standard edition of Bryant is P. Godwin's, 4and. 1817. Monroe President. 1820. Irving's Sketch book. 1821. Bryant's Poems. 1821. Cooper's The spy. 1821. James G. Percival's Poems. 1821. R. H. Dana's Dying Buccaneer. 1826. Lnd Isa-bella. 1838. Hawthorne's Fanshawe. 1839. Longfellow's Voices of the night. 1840. Cooper's The Pathfinder. 1840. R. H. Dana, Jr.'s, Two years before the Mast. 1841. Emerson's Essays, First Series. 1841. Cooper's The Deerslayer. 1844. Emerson's Essays, Second Series. 1844. Lowell's Poems. 1845. Poe's The Paven, and other poems. 1845. War with Mexico. 1847. Lon
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature, Index. (search)
Anne Bradstreet's, 12. Conversation of gentlemen, Shepard's, 19. Cooper, James Fenimore, 92-100, 103, 129, 204, 236, 239, 272. Coquette, Hannah Webster's, 92.eaf, Holmes's, 159. Last man, Mrs. Shelley's, 72. Leather-Stocking tales, Cooper's, 97. Leaves of grass, Whitman's, 221. Lectures on English poets, Hazlit 118-121. Peter, 239. Parton, James, 119. Pater, Walter, 166. Pathfinder, Cooper's, 99. Pendennis, Thackeray's, 258. Penn, William, 74, 147. Pepper, Coloas, 65. Pickwick papers, Dickens's, 90. Pinkney, Edward C., 216. Pioneers, Cooper's, 239. Pit, Norris's, 255. Poe, Edgar Allan, 90, 118, 143, 165, 190, 206 166, 219. Portfolio, 65-69. Power of Dullness, Trumbull's, 40. Prairie, Cooper's, 236. Prescott, William Hickling, 71, 73, 74, 87, 117. Prince of the hous 253. Spinning, Mrs. Jackson's, 264. Spofford, Harriet Prescott, 264. Spy, Cooper's, 103. Stanley, Wallace's, 72. Stedman, Edmund Clarence, 153, 264. Stir
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