hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 136 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 58 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 0 Browse Search
James Buchanan, Buchanan's administration on the eve of the rebellion 5 1 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 4 0 Browse Search
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia. 4 0 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 4 0 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 4 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 4 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 6,842 results in 2,678 document sections:

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 ...
ergency, which were loudly cheered. Resolutions recommending the Legislature to organize thoroughly the military power of the State, and prepare for civil war should it occur; scorning coercion; and preparing to resist invasion, were unanimously adopted.--National Intelligencer, Jan. 7. Apprehensions of an attack on Washington are subsiding, in consequence of the measures already taken. General Carrington, of that city, has issued a call for a military organization for its defence.--(Doc. 15.) In the State Convention of Florida, assembled at Tallahassee, resolutions were offered declaring the right of Florida to secede, and the duty of the State to prepare for secession, made special order for the 7th. A resolution was unanimously adopted in the Missouri Serate, instructing the Committee on Federal Relations to report a bill calling a State Convention.--Times. Steamship Star of the West, Captain McGowan, cleared at New York for Havana and New Orleans. Two hund
ost, Jan. 8. A company of marines was put into Fort Washington, on the Potomac, 14 miles south of Washington city. Forty tons of shot, shell, and powder, were forwarded from New York city by Adams' express for New Orleans; reported to be destined for Mexico, but believed to be for Louisiana. Several volunteer companies of Washington were on parade, and upon dismissal were directed to carry their guns to their homes with forty rounds of ball-cartridges each. The Alabama and Mississippi delegations in Washington held a conference, and telegraphed to the Conventions of their respective States, to advise immediate secession, as they consider that there is no prospect of a satisfactory adjustment. A caucus of Southern senators at Washington advocated separate and immediate secession.--Times, Jan. 7. Governor Hicks, of Maryland, published an address to the people of that State upon his refusal to convene the Legislature. It strongly opposes secession.--(Doc. 16.)
Southern Confederacy she sees no refuge from the ills she must suffer in such an event. Let us, says Governor Hicks, have our rights in the Union, and through and by the Constitution. --Baltimore Sun. The N. C. troops, and persons residing in the vicinity of Forts Caswell and Johnson, took possession of those defences this day. A correspondence on this subject took place immediately between Governor Ellis and Secretary Holt. The forts were surrendered and the State troops removed.--Doc. 17. Secretary Thompson resigned his place in the Cabinet, upon learning that the Star of the West had sailed from New York with troops. From Charleston it is announced that the messages to Fort Sumter cannot be delivered, as there is no communication between the fort and the city. The Sub-Treasurer of Charleston has communicated to the Government, that the South Carolina authorities will not allow him to pay any more drafts, not even to pay Anderson's men. All the cash in his
fforts were made to postpone action, which were voted down. The fifteen delegates who opposed the ordinance will sign it to-morrow, making the vote unanimous. Fireworks were displayed at the capitol in Jackson this evening. The excitement is intense.--New Orleans Picayune, Jan. 10. At half-past 7 A. M. the steamship Star of the West was signalled at the entrance of Charleston harbor. As she made her way toward Fort Sumter, a shot was sent across her bow from a battery on Morris' Island, when she displayed the United States flag, and was repeatedly fired into from the Morris' Island battery and from Fort Moultrie. Her course was then altered, and she again put to sea. Guns were run out at Fort Sumter, but none were fired. At 11 o'clock Major Anderson sent a flag with a communication to Governor Pickens, to inquire if this act had the sanction of the State Government; was informed that it had, and thereupon sent a special messenger to Washington with dispatches.--(Doc. 18.)
ordinance, an immense mass meeting was held in front of the capitol; a secession flag, presented, by the women of Montgomery, was raised on the State House, cannon were fired, guns fired, etc., and in the evening the whole town was illuminated.--(Doc. 19.)--Evening Post, Jan. 12. Judge Jones, of the United States District Court, this afternoon announced from the windows of the court-room in the custom-house building, at Mobile, that the United States Court for the Southern District of Alas in favor of the Union were passed, and cheers given for General Scott and Major Anderson. A flag bearing the inscription, No compromise with slavery, was not allowed to be suspended across Buffalo street. The authorities prevented a general riot.--N. Y. Herald, Jan. 12. Both branches of the New York Legislature adopted strong Union resolutions, tendering the assistance of the State to the President, and ordered them sent to the President, and the Governors of all the States.--(Doc. 20.)
Jan. 12. The Star of the West arrived at New York, having failed to land her troops at Fort Sumter. The Captain reported that unexpected obstacles in the removal of buoys, lights, and ranges, which, though he arrived in the night, compelled him to wait till daybreak outside the harbor, rendered a successful entrance impossible.--(Doc. 21.) Senator Seward, in his place in the Senate, spoke upon the present troubles of the country, and avowed his adherence to the Union, in its integrity and with all its parts; with his friends, with his party, with his State, or without either, as they may determine; in every event, whether of peace or of war; with every consequence of honor or dishonor, of life or death. He said that Union is not less the body than liberty is the soul of the nation. The speech is denounced by both extremes, and is understood by the Southerners to mean coercion, while the political friends of the Senator consider it a relinquishment of his principles.--Ti
Jan. 19. The State Convention of Georgia has adopted the secession ordinance by a vote of two hundred and eight against eighty-nine.--(Doc. 22.) A motion to postpone the operation of the ordinance until the 3d of March was lost by about thirty majority. Alexander H. Stephens and Herschel V. Johnson are among those who voted against the ordinance. The ordinance of secession is ordered to be engrossed on parchment, and to be signed on Monday at noon. Judge Linton Stephens says that, while he approves of the ordinance, he sees no reason for its adoption now. He therefore will not vote for or sign it. Unusual demonstrations of approbation are being made at Milledgeville to-night in honor of the adoption of the ordinance, including the firing of cannon, the letting off of sky-rockets, the burning of torches, and music and speeches.--Richmond Enquirer.
Jan. 21. Jefferson Davis, of Mississippi, withdrew from the Senate at Washington today. The ordinance of secession having passed the Convention of his State, he felt obliged to obey the summons, and retire from all official connection with the Federal Government.--(Doc. 23.) At the Brooklyn, N. Y., navy yard, the entire force was put under arms, and held in readiness to act immediately, through some apprehension of an attack by an organized force of persons in sympathy with secession. The guns of the North Carolina were shotted, and a portion of the Brooklyn city military was mustered to cooperate.--Herald, Jan. 22. The Georgia State Convention resolved, unanimously: As a response to the resolutions of the Legislature of the State of New York, that this Convention highly approves of the energetic and patriotic conduct of the Governor of Georgia in taking possession of Fort Pulaski by the Georgia troops; that this Convention request him to hold possession of said
Jan. 22. Sherrard Clemens of Va. made a strong Union speech in the House of Representatives to-day.--(Doc. 24.)
rn Confederacy hangs by the ensign halliards of Fort Sumter. The Toronto Leader, the Government paper of Canada, this morning says it is in a position to announce in the most positive terms that it is the intention of the English Government to acknowledge the independence of the Southern Confederacy as soon as it is formed. The London Times, in an article on the disunion movement in America, asserts that the United States cannot for many years be to the world what they have been. --(Doc. 25.) An effort was made by the New York police to seize a quantity of fire-arms which were known to be shipped on board the steamer Montgomery. While the officers were searching on board for the arms, the captain ordered the vessel's fasts to be cut, and she steamed away from the pier, scarcely giving the policemen time to jump ashore. The five hundred muskets found on board the schooner Caspian were returned to the captain, the authorities being satisfied that the vessel was bound to
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 ...