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James D. Porter, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, Tennessee (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: June 27, 1864., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 4 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1: prelminary narrative 3 3 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: August 24, 1864., [Electronic resource] 3 3 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 3 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: August 27, 1863., [Electronic resource] 3 3 Browse Search
John Dimitry , A. M., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.1, Louisiana (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
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Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 21: the movement against Petersburg (search)
e Hoke's division, which had already gone to Drury's Bluff, but would not consent to weaken Longstreet or Hill, who were near Riddle's Shop. Hoke was accordingly started for Petersburg early on the 15th, with 18 miles to go. His leading brigade, Hagood's, was picked up by railroad trains and reached Petersburg about sunset, the rest of the division arriving about 9 P. M. Until Hoke came, the whole force at Petersburg consisted of Wise's brigade of infantry not more than 1200 strong, two small rthe day:— We arrive in Petersburg and Kershaw relieves Bushrod Johnson's division, Field taking position on Kershaw's right. A feeble attack is made in the afternoon on Elliott's brigade. No official report is given of any brigade except Hagood's, which describes only skirmishing, and one attempted charge on our extreme left, which never got closer than 250 yards. It was necessary to wait until night before Beauregard's artillery could receive its plaudit of Well done! good and fait
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 22: the Mine (search)
s by the explosion as:— TOTALAGG. In 18th S. C. 4 companies86About 300 were blown up, but a small percentage escaped alive. In 22d S. C. 5 companies170 In Pegram's battery out of 30 Present 22278 Including these, Johnson reports the casualties in his division (Elliott, Wise, Ransom, Gracie), as follows:— Killed, 165; wounded, 415; missing, 359; Total, 938. There are no returns for Mahone's and Hoke's divisions. Hoke's division was composed of Corse's, Clingman's, Fulton's, Hagood's, and Colquitt's brigades, and Mahone's had only three brigades on the field,—Weiseger's, Wright's, and Sanders's. Of these eight brigades, only Weiseger's had serious losses, but there are no reports except for Colquitt's, who, like the rest of Hoke's division, held a portion of the line not attacked. His casualties were 4 killed and 27 wounded. The total Confederate loss is given in the Tabular Statement of the Medical Department as: 400 killed, 600 wounded, and 200 missing, which is per<
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.), Organization of the Confederate States army. (search)
Organization of the Confederate States army. May 21st, 1864. Commander: General G. T. Beauregard. Hoke's division. First brigade Commander: Brigadier-General Hagood---7th South Carolina battalion, and 11th, 21st, 25th and 27th South Carolina Volunteers. Second brigade Commander: Brigadier-General Colquitt---6th, 19th, 23d, 27th and 28th Georgia Volunteers. Third brigade Commander: Brigadier-General Clingman---8th, 31st, 51st and 61st North Carolina Volunteers. Fourth brigade Commander: Brigadier-General Martin---17th, 42d and 66th North Carolina Volunteers. Johnson's division. First brigade Commander: Brigadier-General Walker---17th, 18th, 22d and 26th South Carolina Volunteers. Second brigade Commander: Brigadier-General Ransom---24th, 25th, 35th, 49th and 56th North Carolina Volunteers. Third brigade Commander: Brigadier-General Johnson---63d, 17th, 23d, 25th and 44th Tennessee Volunteers. Fourth brigade Commander: Brigad
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.), Field Return of Troops commanded by General G. T. Beauregard, May 21st, 1864. (search)
nance Officers.Aides de Camp.Colonels.Lieutenant-Colonels.Majors.Quartermasters.Commissaries.Adjutants.Surgeons.Captains.Lieutenants.Chaplains.Non-Commissioned Officers.Enlisted Men.Officers.Enlisted Men.Officers.Enlisted Men.Officers.Enlisted Men.Officers.Enlisted Men.Officers.Enlisted Men. General and staff1 512   11 2           13 13    Hoke's division                              Martin's brigade 111122242272190 2101,612        1,958  Reports not complete. Reports not complete. Hagood's brigade 11112221227185111911,2532686196 11001,7091,809941,8313,734 Clingman's brigade 121124352372566 2111,22221137  1251,4711,596801,2242,900 Colquitt's brigade 11 13241235268242851,284670486231411,7281,869711,0322,971 Johnson's division                              Wise's brigade 12113233236308132811,6832117252 11452,1342,279458013,125 Walker's brigade  2 1323  37259042411,461     
York, pressed up to the edge of the ditch, and captured a flag which had been cut down by a shell from the navy. It is a mistake, as was at first reported to me, that any soldier entered the fort. An orderly was killed about a third of a mile from the fort and his horse taken. In the meantime the remainder of Ames' division had captured two hundred and eighteen men and ten commissioned officers of the North Carolina reserves and other prisoners. From them I learned that Kirkland's and Hagood's brigade of Hoke's division had left the front of the Army of the James, near Richmond, and were then within two miles of the rear of my forces, and their skirmishers were then actually engaged, and that the remainder of Hoke's division had come the night before to Wilmington, and were then on the march, if they had not already arrived. I learned, also, that these troops had left Richmond on Tuesday, the twentieth. Knowing the strength of Hoke's division, I found a force opposed to me
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army, Roster of chaplains, army of Northern Virginia. (search)
m's Battalion. Rev. Mr. Rodman. Poague's Battalion. James Wheary. Cutt's Battalion. Garnett's Battalion. McIntosh's Battalion. Fourth Corps (General R. H. Anderson): Hoke's Division. Colquitt's Brigade. Nineteenth Georgia. A. J. Jarrell; W. H. C. Cone. Twenty-third Georgia. W. A. Dodge. Twenty-seventh Georgia. George S. Emory. Sixth Georgia. A. M. Thigpen. Twenty-eighth Georgia. A. H. McVay. Clingman's (North Carolina) Brigade, Martin's (North Carolina) Brigade, and Hagood's (South Carolina) Brigade, which had been attached to Hoke's Division, were at this period (February, 1865) on detached service, and I have been unable to obtain a list of their chaplains. B. R. Johnson's Division. Ransom's Brigade. Twenty-fourth North Carolina. T. B. Neil. Twenty-fifth North Carolina. Thirty-fifth North Carolina. Fifty-sixth North Carolina. Gracie's Brigade. Forty-first Alabama. Sixtieth Alabama. Fortieth Alabama. Wise's Brigade. Thirty-fourth Virgini
milio's 54th Mass., p. 95. A good deal of just indignation was created after this event, by a report, widely disseminated, that an order had been given by General Hagood, in command at Fort Wagner, in respect to Colonel Shaw's body, to bury him with his niggers. In conversing with General Hagood ten years after the writer wasGeneral Hagood ten years after the writer was expressly assured by him that no such order was given by him and that no such conversation took place, and I was entirely convinced that there had been some misunderstanding on the part of Assistant Surgeon John T. Luck, U. S. N., by whom the charge was originally made in the Army and Navy Journal. Army and Navy Journal, III, p. 71. A letter to me on the same point from General Hagood will be found in Emilio's History of the 54th Mass., Emilio, p. 100. where the whole affair is discussed. I still retain my original opinion of the matter. The 24th Mass. Infantry (Colonel Osborne) formed an important part of the besieging force which subsequently
beginning to return the fire not to shoot, and made signals to the supposed friends. Young Mangum, who had sprung to his feet at the sound of the firing, fell mortally wounded, and several others were killed or disabled. Not knowing what to do, the regiment fell back in some confusion to the point where it had entered the field, and the enemy advanced to recover the battery. On Kershaw's advance, however, the Sixth again went to the front, and some of them had the pleasure of seeing General Hagood and Captain Kemper of Kershaw's force turn the recaptured guns on their enemies. Shortly after this the arrival of Gen. Kirby Smith's forces on the enemy's right flank ended the battle. The Sixth lost 73 men in killed and wounded. Gen. William Smith, (Southern Historical Society's Papers, Vol. X, p. 439) falls into a grievous mistake about this regiment. He says, When driven back from the guns, neither the North Carolinians nor the Mississippians remained to renew the charge, but
es. Ryan's company was accepted, but failed. Whenever, however, any of Putnam's men showed themselves, the Fifty-first North Carolina opened upon them. Colonel Putnam was killed, and his force—approached in rear by some Georgians who, with General Hagood, had crossed over during the battle—was captured. General Taliaferro makes this favorable report of the Fifty-first regiment: Colonel McKethan's regiment, the Fifty-first North Carolina troops, redeemed the reputation of the Thirty-first. 28th of August, an infantry assault on the rifle-pits in front of Wagner was bravely met and repulsed by the two Confederate regiments there. General Taliaferro reports: Soon after dark he advanced upon the rifle-pits in front of Wagner, but General Hagood's forces were, fortunately, prepared to receive him. His mortar practice ceased and his infantry assaulted fiercely, but the position was held with courage and spirit, and success crowned the efforts of the brave men of the Sixty-first North
uregard says, he handled his command with that resolution and judgment for which he was conspicuous, formed his line with Hagood and Johnson on his left, and Clingman (North Carolina) and Corse on his right. At dawn he threw out skirmishers, and opened his artillery. The infantry attack began with an advance of Hagood's and Johnson's brigades. They went in with determination and success. Hagood's brigade captured five pieces of artillery and a number of prisoners, and the two brigades occupiHagood's brigade captured five pieces of artillery and a number of prisoners, and the two brigades occupied the enemy's works. But the enemy attacked Hoke's front with fierceness. Especially on Johnson's right was the fighting continuous, Generals Terry and Turner struggling tenaciously to hold their ground. General Clingman's and General Corse's brneral Hoke, to whom a permanent division, composed of Martin's and Clingman's North Carolina brigades and Colquitt's and Hagood's brigades, had been assigned, also reported to General Lee at Cold Harbor just in time to be of the utmost service to hi
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