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Browsing named entities in Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1. You can also browse the collection for Battle Hymn or search for Battle Hymn in all documents.

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Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 12: Stepping westward 1901-1902; aet. 82-83 (search)
ck to us to-day, and we see his radiant smile as he led her forward. It is only the older ones among us, he said, who have seen Dr. Howe, but there are hundreds here who will want to tell their children that they have seen the author of the Battle Hymn of the Republic. Part of her word was as follows:-- We have listened to-day to very heroic memories; it almost took away our breath to think that such things were done in the last century. I feel very grateful to the pupils and gradua This was a very distinguished honor. The conversation was rather literary. The President admires Emerson's poems, and also Longfellow and Sienkiewicz. He paid me the compliment of saying that Kipling alone had understood the meaning of my Battle Hymn, and that he admired him therefor. Wister proposed the baby's health, and I recited a quatrain which came to me early this morning. Here it is:--Roses are the gift of God, Laurels are the gift of fame; Add the beauty of thy life To the glory
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 13: looking toward sunset 1903-1905; aet. 84-86 (search)
in dressing quickly. With dear Flossy took 9 A. M. train for Boston. At Middletown station found the teachers from the West [Denver and Iowa], who started the Battle Hymn when they saw me approaching. This seemed to me charming. My man Michael, recognizing the tune, said: Mrs. Howe, this is a send-off for you! . . . She was us. In fact, she so rarely signed her own name in writing to us that when asked for autographs we were posed. Town Pump was no autograph for the author of the Battle Hymn ! There was another mince pie, a little, pretty one, which she saw at a Papeterie meeting, the last summer of her life; saw, coveted, secreted, with her hoste. November 12. I to attend meeting of Council of Jewish Women; say something regarding education. .... I was warmly received and welcomed, and recited my Battle Hymn by special request. This last gave me an unexpected thrill of satisfaction. The president said: Dear Mrs. Howe, there is nothing in it to wound us. I had fea
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 14: the sundown splendid and serene 1906-1907; aet. 87-88 (search)
ongregation, in which a number of white outsiders were mingled in with the people of the church.... Mrs. Jeter sang my Battle Hymn, the congregation joining in the Glory Hallelujah. I then read my screed, which was heard with profound attention, on 17. The Old South Chapter of D. A.R.'s, met in the real Old South Church; there was much good speaking. I recited my Battle Hymn and boasted my descent from General Marion, the Swamp Fox, saying also, When, eluding the vigilance of children and grd as I thought it. To my surprise, it told, and created the merriment which had been my object so far as I had any. My Battle Hymn was sung finely by a male quartette. Colonel Higginson and I were praised almost out of our senses. A calendar, got e a flash, she says, but had to be much thought over and corrected. And again, It was given to me something as was my Battle Hymn. . . . October 25. Wrote to a very bumptious child, thirteen years old, who proffers me her friendship and correspo
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 15: mine eyes have seen the glory of the coming of the Lord 1908-1910; aet. 89-91 (search)
nvited to do so. August 28. Wrote an immediate reply to a Mrs.--, who had written to ask leave to use a part of my Battle Hymn with some verses of her own. I replied, refusing this permission, but saying that she should rewrite her own part sufficiently to leave mine out, and should not call it the Battle Hymn of the Republic. The metre and tune, of course, she might use, as they are not mine in any special sense, but my phrases not. After writing an article for the Delineator, on Whatnded me my diploma, while some third party placed a picturesque hood upon my shoulders. The band played the air of my Battle Hymn, and applause followed me as I went back to my seat. So there! Her companion on that occasion writes:-- She sing to an afternoon tea at a musical house, where, after listening to Schumann Romances and Chopin waltzes, and to the Battle Hymn on the 'cello, she was moved to give a performance of Flibbertigibbet. This occasion reminded her happily of her fath
S. J., II, 209, 228. Bartenders' Union, I, 391. Bartol, C. A., I, 221, 222, 234, 245, 286, 346; II, 127. Barton, Clara, II, 210, 215. Batcheller, Mrs., Alfred, II, 269. Batcheller, Mrs., Frank, II, 292. Battle Abbey, I, 4. Battle Hymn, I, 9, 173, 187, 188, 189, 190, 191, 230, 234; II, 108, 125, 136, 155, 191, 233, 250, 265, 273, 279, 311, 327, 349, 351, 354, 365, 381, 392, 411, 412. Baur, F. C., I, 329, 332, 333, 335, 356. Bayard, T. F., II, 96. Beach, H. P., II, 6lowers, 136-44, of Words for the Hour, 144, and of The World's Own, 144-45; edits paper for her children, 162-64; trip to Cuba, 173-76; publication of A Trip to Cuba, 176; Tribune letters, 176; birth and death of second son, 178-84; writing of Battle Hymn, 186-91; visit to the army, 192, 193; removal to Chestnut St., 194; philosophical studies and essays, 195-202, 206, 208, 213-19, 222, 224, 225, 227, 229-31, 236, 249, 250-53, 259; writing of Hippolytus, 203-05; edits Boatswain's Whistle, 210-1
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