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General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 30: Longstreet moves to Georgia. (search)
in, Now, general, you must beat those people out in the West. Withdrawing my foot to respectful position I promised, If I live; but I would not give a single man of my command for a fruitless victory. He promised again that it should be so; said that arrangements had been made that any success that we had would be followed; that orders to that effect had been given; that transportation was also ordered to be prepared, and the orders would be repeated. While the troops were in transit, Jenkins's South Carolina brigade was transferred to Hood's division, so that we had two South Carolina and four Georgia brigades of the two divisions, which gave us some little trouble in keeping our men on the cars passing by their homes. The people crowded every station to give us their all in most acceptable rations, and to cheer us with wishes for a happy issue. The train upon which I rode reached Catoosa about two o'clock of the afternoon of the 19th of September. That upon which our hor
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 32: failure to follow success. (search)
premises. Finally, I asked his aid in putting the divisions that were with me in more efficient working order, by assigning a major-general to command Hood's division. He had been so seriously crippled that he could not be in condition to take the field again even if he recovered, and a commander for the division was essential to its proper service. As he had no one, or failed to name any one, for the place, I suggested the promotion of the senior brigadier then in command of it, General M. Jenkins, who was a bright, gallant, and efficient officer of more than two years experience in active warfare, loved by his troops, and all acquaintances as well. He had been transferred, recently, by the War Department to the division, upon application of General Hood, and in consequence there was some feeling of rivalry between him and Brigadier-General Law, the next in rank, who had served with the division since its organization, and had commanded it at Gettysburg after General Hood was w
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 33: the East Tennessee campaign. (search)
r one hundred guns. Eight thousand of his men were on service north of Knoxville and about Cumberland Gap. To march, and capture or disperse this formidable force, fortified at points, I had McLaws's and Hood's divisions of infantry, Colonel Alexander's and Major Leydon's artillery, and four brigades of General Wheeler's cavalry. Kershaw's, Humphreys's, Wofford's, and Bryan's brigades constituted McLaws's division. Hood's division, which was commanded during the campaign by Brigadier-General M. Jenkins, was made up of Jenkins's, Anderson's, Benning's, Law's, and Robertson's brigades. General Wheeler's cavalry was organized into two divisions of two brigades each,--General John T. Morgan's Alabama and Colonel Cruse's Georgia brigades, under Major-General W. T. Martin; Colonels G. G. Dibbrell's Tennessee and Thomas Harrison's Texas brigades, under Brigadier-General Frank Armstrong. This made about fifteen thousand men, after deducting camp guards and foraging parties. The remot
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 38: battle of the Wilderness. (search)
ment General Wadsworth mortally wounded General Jenkins falls under fire of friends, and Longstreed from the field on a litter Tribute to General Jenkins criticism and controversy. After repo, the other troops moved down the Plank road, Jenkins's brigade by the road, Kershaw's division alongside. I rode at the head of the column, Jenkins, Kershaw, and the staff with me. After discussinsitions of their troops for reopening battle, Jenkins rode closer to offer congratulations, saying,officers was up and rode under the fire. General Jenkins had not finished the expressions of joyfueral Kershaw turned to quiet the troops, when Jenkins's brigade with levelled guns were in the act down upon their faces. At the moment that Jenkins fell I received a severe shock from a minie bre), made desperate and repeated charges, and Jenkins's gallant brigade mounted their breastworks, n the air eased my pains somewhat. But Micah Jenkins, who fell by the same fire, was no more. [1 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The opposing forces at Williamsburg, Va. (search)
Maj. William H. Palmer (w); 7th Va., Col. James L. Kemper; 11th Va., Col. Samuel Garland (w); 17th Va., Col. M. D. Corse. Brigade loss: k, 67; w, 245; m, 14 == 326. Second Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Richard H. Anderson (in command on the right), Col. Micah Jenkins: 4th S. C. (Battalion), Maj. C. S. Mattison; 5th S. C.. Col. John R. R. Giles; 6th S. C., Col. John Bratton; Palmetto (S. C.) Sharp-shooters, Col. Micah Jenkins, Lieut.-Col. Joseph Walker; La. Foot Rifles, Capt. McG. Goodwyn; Fauquier (Va.Col. Micah Jenkins, Lieut.-Col. Joseph Walker; La. Foot Rifles, Capt. McG. Goodwyn; Fauquier (Va.) Artillery, Capt. Robert M. Stribling; Williamsburg (Va.) Artillery, (2 guns), Capt. William R. Garrett; Richmond (Va.), Howitzers (2 guns), Capt. Edward S. McCarthy. Brigade loss: k, 10; w, 75; m, 6 ==91. Third Brigade, Brig.-Gen. George E. Pickett: 8th Va., Lieut.-Col. Norbourne Berkeley; 18th Va., Lieut.-Col. Henry A. Carrington; 19th Va., Col. John B. Strange; 28th Va., Col. Robert C. Allen; Va. Battery, Capt. James Dearing. Brigade loss: k, 26; w, 138; m, 26 == 190. Fourth Brigade, Brig.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Opposing forces at Seven Pines, May 31-June 1, 1862. (search)
k, 1; w, 3 = 4. The total Union loss (Revised Official Returns) was 790 killed, 3594 wounded, and 647 captured or missing = 5031. The Confederate Army. General Joseph E. Johnston (w); Major-General Gustavus W. Smith; General Robert E. Lee. right wing, Major-General James Longstreet. Longstreet's division, Brig.-Gen. Richard H. Anderson (temporarily). Kemper's Brigade, Col. James L. Kemper: 1st Va.; 7th Va.; 11th Va.; 17th Va., Col. M. D. Corse. Anderson's (R. H.) Brigade, Col. Micah Jenkins: 5th S. C., Col. J. R. R. Giles (k), Lieut.-Col. A. Jackson; 6th S. C., Col. John Bratton (w and c), Lieut.-Col. J. M. Steedman; Palmetto (S. C.) Sharp-shooters, Maj. William Anderson; Va. Battery, Capt. Robert M. Stribling. Pickett's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. George E. Pickett: 8th Va., Lieut.-Col. N. Berkeley; 18th Va., Col. R. E. Withers; 19th Va., Col. John B. Strange; 28th Va., Col. William Watts; Va. Battery, Capt. James Dearing. Brigade loss: k and w, 350. Wilcox's Brigade, Brig.-Gen
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 5.26 (search)
says: A portion of this force, under Colonel Jenkins, consisting of the Palmetto Sharp-shootervision, except the regiment that was with Colonel Jenkins, succeeded in getting beyond the second a musketry and artillery, materially aided Colonel Jenkins in bursting across the Williamsburg road.should be also borne in mind that, whilst Colonel Jenkins was fighting his way to the Williamsburg ation were not thrown against the rear of Colonel Jenkins's three regiments, that were so gallantlyamsburg road. With the rest of his force Colonel Jenkins was preparing to move against the enemy i regiments of Longstreet's division under Colonel Jenkins. On the Federal side the losses in theecond abatis. Before midnight, May 31st, Colonel Jenkins's command was withdrawn to Seven Pines, adivision, which occupied the ground where Colonel Jenkins's command ceased fighting the previous dawhere General Longstreet then was, whilst Colonel Jenkins's three regiments were scouring the rear [11 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 7.42 (search)
; 11th Va., Capt. K. Otey; 17th Va., Col. M. I). Corse; 24th Va., Lieut.-Col. Peter Hairston; Va. Battery (Loudoun Arty.), Capt. Arthur L. Rogers. Brigade loss: k, 44; w, 205; nm, 165 == 414. Second Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Richard H. Anderson, Col. Micah Jenkins: 2d S. C. (Rifles), Col. J. V. Moore; 4th S. C. (Battalion), Maj. C. S. Mattison; 5th S. C., Lieut.-Col. A. Jackson; 6th S. C., Col. John Bratton; Palmetto (S. C.) Sharp-shooters, Col. Micah Jenkins, Lieut.-Col. Joseph Walker. Brigade lossCol. Micah Jenkins, Lieut.-Col. Joseph Walker. Brigade loss: k, 136; w, 638; mn, 13== 787. Third Brigade, Brig.-Gen. George E. Pickett (w), Col. John B. Strange, Col. Eppa Hunton, Col. John B. Strange: 8th Va., Col. Eppa Hunton; 18th Va., Col. R. E. Withers (w); 19th Va., Col. John B. Strange; 28th Va., Col. Robert C. Allen; 56th Va., Col. W. D. Stuart. Brigade loss: k, 72; w, 563; m, 19 == 654. Fourth Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Cadmus M. Wilcox: 8th Ala., Lieut.-Col. Y. L. Royston (w); 9th Ala., Maj. J. H. J. Williams, Capt. J. H. King (w); 10th Ala., Col. J
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 7.51 (search)
t. Thompson's battery of Kearny's division was with General Robinson's brigade (7). Confederate brigades: a, Kemper; b, Pickett (Hunton); c, R. II. Anderson (Jenkins); d, Wilcox; e, Featherston; f, Pryor; g, Branch; h, Archer; i, Field; j, J. R. Anderson; k, Pender; l, Gregg; m, n, o, p, Armistead, Wright, Mahone, and Ransom. ls doubtless had no idea that the Confederate President, commanding General, and division commanders were receiving point-blank shot from their batteries. Colonel Micah Jenkins was in front of us, and I sent him an order to silence the Federal battery, supposing that he could do so with his long-range rifles. He became engaged, aought on a General fight between my division and the troops in front of us. Kemper on my right advanced his brigade over difficult ground and captured a battery. Jenkins moved his brigade forward and made a bold fight. He was followed by the other four brigades successively. the enemy's line was broken, and he was partly dislo
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 8.58 (search)
essful,--and notified the commanding general, then opposite me on the turnpike, that Longstreet's flank and rear were seriously threatened, and of the importance to us of the ridge I then held. Immediately upon the receipt of that intelligence, Jenkins's, Kemper's, and D. R. Joneses brigades, and several pieces of artillery were ordered to me by General Longstreet, and, being placed in position fronting Bristoe, awaited the enemy's advance. After exchanging a few shots with rifle-pieces this tion, of which his official report has not been received, and was instructed to cooperate with Jackson's left. Late in the afternoon the artillery on this commanding ridge was, to an important degree, auxiliary to the attack upon the enemy, and Jenkins's brigade repulsed the enemy in handsome style at one volley, as they advanced across a corn-field. Thus the day ended, our lines having considerably advanced. What would have been the effect of the application on the enemy's right at, or a
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