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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Name Index of Commands 6 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 2 Browse Search
Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army . 5 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 5 1 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 2: Two Years of Grim War. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 5 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: September 7, 1861., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 4 0 Browse Search
Jula Ward Howe, Reminiscences: 1819-1899 4 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 3 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The Peninsular campaign. (search)
and suggested that my plans should be laid before them that they might give their opinion as to whether the capital would be endangered; I also said that in order to leave them perfectly untrammeled I would not attend the meeting. Accordingly they met on the 8th of March and approved my plans. On the same day was issued, without my knowledge, the order forming army corps and assigning the senior general officers to their command. First Corps, McDowell — Divisions: Franklin, McCall, and King; Second Corps, Sumner — Divisions: Richardson, Blenker, and Sedgwick; Third Corps, Heintzelman — Divisions: Porter, Hooker, and Hamilton; Fourth Corps, Keyes — Divisions: Couch, Smith, and Casey. The reserve artillery (Henry J. Hunt), the regular infantry (George Sykes), and regular cavalry (Philip St. George Cooke) and engineer troops were attached to headquarters.--Editors. My own views were that, as the command of army corps involved great responsibility and demanded ability of a high or
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Fighting Jackson at Kernstown. (search)
Kimball's brigade was ordered into a newly fenced field for its camp, and no sooner were the men dismissed from ranks than the entire fence disappeared. General King, who was in command at this place, seeing this movement from his quarters at the Phillips Mansion, sent down an aide-de-camp to arrest all of our officers, and compel the men to rebuild the fence. Officers laughed and the men jeered at him. The rails were soon on fire, and our dinners cooking. King called up his adjutant, Major Barstow, who had been General Lander's adjutant when he commanded us, and ordered him to detail sufficient troops to arrest our whole division, exclaiming: Whooops from Western Virginia; you had better keep your guards here at headquarters, for you'll be devilish lucky if they don't steal your house-roof before morning! King was dumfounded, but his fence was never rebuilt. Editors. and Fremont beyond the Shenandoah mountains, Jackson, on the 23d, with his army of about 1500, dashed do
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 7.42 (search)
s Quinlan. Brigade loss: k, 34; w, 227, In, 232==493. Third Brigade, Brig.-Gen. William H. French: 2d Del., Lieut.-Col. William P. Baily, Capt. D. L. Stricker; 52d N. Y., Col. Paul Frank; 57th N. Y., Col. Samuel K. Zook; 64th N. Y., Col. Thomas J. Parker; 66th N. Y., Col. Joseph C. Pinckney; 53d Pa., Col. John R. Brooke. Brigade loss: k, 3; w, 43; m, 162==208. Artillery, Capt. George W. Hazzard (m w): B, 1st N. Y., Capt. Rufus D. Pettit; A and C, 4th U. S., Capt. George W. Hazzard, Lieut. Rufus King, Jr. Artillery loss: w, 19; m, 10==29. Second division, Brig.-Gen. John Sedgwick. First Brigade, Col. Alfred Sully: 15th Mass., Lieut.-Col. John W. Kimball; 1st Minn., Lieut.-Col. Stephen Miller; 1st Co. Mass. Sharp-shooters, Capt. John Saunders; 34th N. Y., Col. James A. Suiter; 82d N. Y., Col. Henry W. Hudson; 2d Co. Minn. Sharp-shooters, Capt. William F. Russell. Brigade loss: k, 12; w, 82; in, 152==246. Second Brigade, Brig.-Gen. William W. Burns (w): 69th Pa., Col. Joshua T. Owen
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Lee's attacks north of the Chickahominy. (search)
s) marks the location of the Union battery which opened upon Hill's troops as they came along this road, from which the Confederate artillery (McIntosh's and Pegram's) replied as they advanced. Anderson's brigade was sent to the left to flank the Union guns, which, together with the single regiment left in the town by General Porter, withdrew before the enemy to the strong position beyond the creek. Editors. than those of us lower down the stream. On the 25th there was a brisk fight about King's school-house on the Williamsburg road, between Hooker's division and parts of the divisions of Generals T. H. Holmes and Benjamin Huger. That night my division marched across to the neighborhood of Mechanicsville Bridge. To conceal the movement our camp-fires were freshly lighted up by a detachment after the troops had left, and a company was sent some miles down the Charles City road to send up rockets, as though signaling an advance in that direction. General Lee's order, issued on the
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 8.58 (search)
or no communication or concert of action with one another; Fremont and Banks being at Middletown, in the Shenandoah Valley, and McDowell's corps widely separated, King's division at Fredericksburg, and Ricketts's at and beyond Manassas Junction. The general purpose at that time was to demonstrate with the army toward Gordonsvifrom Warrenton to Sperryville crosses the Rappahannock, there known as Hedgman's River. In deference to the wishes of the Government, and much against my opinion, King's division of the same corps was kept at Fredericksburg. The wide separation of this division from the main body of the army not only deprived me of its use when,f the false impressions created by this statement. Under the orders heretofore referred to, the concentration of the three corps of the Army of Virginia (except King's division of McDowell's corps) was completed, Sigel's corps being at Sperryville, Banks's at Little Washington, and Ricketts's division of McDowell's corps at Wat
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., In vindication of General Rufus King. (search)
In vindication of General Rufus King. by Charles King, Captain, U. S. A. In writing for The century magazine his recollections of The Second battle of Bull Run, General Pope has, perhaps inadvertently, used the exact language which, in 1863, and long after, so bitterly hurt one of his most loyal subordinates. In the course of his article appear these words [see p. 470]: I sent orders to McDowell (supposing him to be with his command), and also direct to General King, several times during that night and once by his own staff-officer, to hold his ground at all hazards. Now the casual reader, ignoring the commas before and after the words and also direct to General King, would say that orders were sent to King several times that night and once by his own staff-officer. Indeed, these words have been used as authority in the army, in histories, even in Congressional debate, for the statement that General King received repeated orders to hold his ground on the evening of Augu
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The opposing forces at the Second Bull Run. August 16th-September 2d, 1862. (search)
son, Jr.; M, 1st N. Y., Capt. George W. Cothran; 10th N. Y., Capt. John T. Bruen; E, Pa., Capt. Joseph M. Knap; F, 4th U. S., Lieut. Edward D. Muhlenberg. Cavalry Brigade, Brig.-Gen. John Buford. 1st Mich., Col. Thornton F. Brodhead (m w), Maj. Charles H. Town; 5th N. Y., Col. Othniel De Forest; 1st Vt., Col. Charles H. Tompkins; 1st W. Va., Lieut.-Col. Nathaniel P. Richmond. Brigade loss: k, 15; w, 35; m, 150 = 200. Third Army Corps, Maj.-Gen. Irvin McDowell. first division, Brig.-Gen. Rufus King, Brig.-Gen. John P. Hatch (w), Brig.-Gen. Abner Doubleday. Staff loss: w, 1. First Brigade, Brig.-Gen. John P. Hatch, Col. Timothy Sullivan: 22d N. Y., Col. Walter Phelps, Jr.; 24th N. Y., Col. Timothy Sullivan; 30th N. Y., Col. Edward Frisby (k); 84th N. Y. (14th Militia), Lieut.-Col. Edward B. Fowler (w), Maj. William H. de Bevoise; 2d U. . Sharpshooters, Col. Henry A. V. Post. Brigade loss: k, 95; w, 382; m, 295 = 772. Second Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Abner Doubleday, Col. William
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Jackson's raid around Pope. (search)
h on that point from Gainesville, with his right resting on the Manassas Gap Railroad; Reynolds, also from Gainesville, to keep his left on the Warrenton road; and King's division to move en échelon in support of the other two. In the execution of this order, Reynolds's column struck Johnson's command; but after a short conflicy's, Forno's, and Johnson's brigades were not engaged, nor were any of the brigades of General A. P. Hill's division. The Federal troops encountered were those of King's division, and consisted of the brigade of Gibbon and two regiments of Doubleday's brigade. In this battle the right of the Confederate line was held by Taliaf position north of the turnpike leading from Warrenton to Alexandria. There, on the old battle-field, Jackson waited for the Federals. On the evening of the 28th King's division came moving east — ward down the turnpike and Jackson met them. A bloody fight ensued, lasting until 9 o'clock at night. The enemy withdrew, leaving t
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The time of Longstreet's arrival at Groveton. (search)
The time of Longstreet's arrival at Groveton. D. M. Perry, sergeant in Company E, 76th New York (of Doubleday's brigade, King's division, McDowell's corps), wrote to the editors in 1886 to say that he was wounded in the attack made on the flank of King's division as it was passing Jackson's front on the evening of August 28th, was left on the field, was taken prisoner, hobbled off the next morning, and again fell into the hands of the enemy, Hood's men, of Longstreet's corps. By an ingeniKing's division as it was passing Jackson's front on the evening of August 28th, was left on the field, was taken prisoner, hobbled off the next morning, and again fell into the hands of the enemy, Hood's men, of Longstreet's corps. By an ingenious device he managed to retain possession of his watch. He says: I awoke at 7 A. M., August 29th, by the Warrenton Pike, near Douglass's woods. A few yards away, under the trees, were several wounded comrades. ... I made use of a broken musket as a crutch, and was well on my way to the shelter of the trees, when some one called out: Throw down that gun. It was not until the order had been repeated that I was aware it was addressed to me. Looking round, I saw a company of the enemy's cav
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The opposing forces in the Maryland campaign. (search)
e A. Gordon; 8th U. S. Inf. (4 co's), Capt. Royal T. Frank; G, 19th U. S. Inf., Capt. Edmund L. Smith; H, 19th U. S. Inf., Capt. Henry S. Welton. Headquarters Guard, Maj. Granville O. Haller: 93d N. Y., Lieut.-Col. Benjamin C. Butler. Quartermaster's Guard: 1st U. S. Cav. (4 co's), Capt. Marcus A. Reno. first Army Corps,, Maj.-Gen. Joseph Hooker (w), Brig.-Gen. George G. Meade. Staff loss: Antietam, w, 1. Escort: 2d N. Y. Cav. (4 co's), Capt. John E. Naylor. first division, Brig.-Gen. Rufus King, Brig.-Gen. John P. Hatch (w), Brig.-Gen. Abner Doubleday. Staff loss: South Mountain, w, 1. First Brigade, Col. Walter Phelps, Jr.: 22d N. Y., Lieut.-Col. John McKie, Jr.; 24th N. Y., Capt. John D. O'Brian (w); 30th N. Y., Col. William M. Searing; 84th N. Y. (14th Militia), Maj. William 11. de Bevoise; 2d U. S. Sharp-shooters, Col. Henry A. V. Post (w). Brigade loss: South Mountain, k, 20; w, 67; m, 8 == 95. Antietam, k, 30; w, 120; ml, 4 == 154. Second Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Abn
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