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Lycurgus, Speeches 4 0 Browse Search
Plato, Alcibiades 1, Alcibiades 2, Hipparchus, Lovers, Theages, Charmides, Laches, Lysis 4 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 4 0 Browse Search
Isocrates, Speeches (ed. George Norlin) 4 0 Browse Search
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Demosthenes, Speeches 21-30 2 0 Browse Search
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Vitruvius Pollio, The Ten Books on Architecture (ed. Morris Hicky Morgan) 2 0 Browse Search
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Demosthenes, For the Megalopolitans, section 4 (search)
Now no one would deny that our city is benefited by the weakness of the Lacedaemonians and of the Thebans yonder.A gesture reminds his hearers how near neighbors the Thebans were. The position of affairs, then, if one may judge from statements repeatedly made in your Assembly, is such that the Thebans will be weakened by the refounding of Orchomenus, Thespiae and Plataea, but the Lacedaemonians will regain their power, if they get Arcadia into their hands and destroy Megalopolis.
Demosthenes, For the Megalopolitans, section 25 (search)
In order, then, that this unwillingness may not stand in the way of the weakening of Thebes, let us admit that Thespiae, Orchomenus and Plataea ought to be restored, and let us co-operate with their inhabitants and appeal to the other states, for it is a just and honorable policy not to allow ancient cities to be uprooted; but at the same time let us not abandon Megaloand Plataea ought to be restored, and let us co-operate with their inhabitants and appeal to the other states, for it is a just and honorable policy not to allow ancient cities to be uprooted; but at the same time let us not abandon Megalopolis and Messene to their oppressors, nor allow the restoration of Plataea and Thespiae to blind us to the destruction of existing and established states.
Demosthenes, On the Crown, section 208 (search)
But no; you cannot, men of Athens, you cannot have done wrongly when you accepted the risks of war for the redemption and the liberties of mankind; I swear it by our forefathers who bore the brunt of warfare at Marathon, who stood in array of battle at Plataea, who fought in the sea-fights of Salamis and Artemisium, and by all the brave men who repose in our public sepulchres, buried there by a country that accounted them all to be alike worthy of the same honor —all, I say, Aeschines, not the successful and the victorious alone. So justice bids: for by all the duty of brave men was accomplished: their fortune was such as Heaven severally allotted to them
Demosthenes, On the False Embassy, section 21 (search)
of the repopulation of Thespiae and Plataea, and of the recovery of Apollo's treasure, not from the Phocians, but from the Thebans, who had planned the seizure of the temple. It was himself, he added, who had instructed Philip that those who contrived the project were quite as sacrilegious as the men by whose hands it was executed; and therefore the Thebans had set a price on his head!
Demosthenes, On the False Embassy, section 42 (search)
All this chicanery, and much besides, might have been instantly detected, and you might have been informed and spared the sacrifice of your interests, if you had not been cheated out of the truth by that story of Thespiae and Plataea and the imminent punishment of the Thebans. Yet if Philip's promises were merely for show, and if the city was to be deluded, it was right to mention them; if, on the other hand, they were really to be fulfilled, it was best to say nothing about them. For if the project was so far matured that the Thebans could gain nothing by hearing of it, why has it not been executed? But if it has been thwarted because they had news of it in time, who let the secret out?
Demosthenes, On the False Embassy, section 112 (search)
For he had told you that Philip would fortify Thespiae and Plataea, would not destroy the Phocians, and would put a stop to the aggressions of the Thebans; but Philip has made the Thebans dangerously strong, he has exterminated the Phocians, and, instead of fortifying Thespiae and Plataea, he has enslaved Orchomenus and Coronea as well. Could contradiction go further? Yet Aeschines offered noPlataea, he has enslaved Orchomenus and Coronea as well. Could contradiction go further? Yet Aeschines offered no opposition; he never opened his lips or made a single objection. That was bad—but not bad enough for him. He did what no other man in all Athens did—he spoke in support of the envoys. Even that miscreant Philocrates durst not go so far as that—only this man Aeschines. When you raised a clamor, and refused to hear
Demosthenes, On the False Embassy, section 325 (search)
In this manner and by the aid of this artifice our ruin was accomplished by men themselves doomed to perdition. For at once, instead of witnessing the restoration of Thespiae and Plataea, you heard of the enslavement of Orchomenus and Coronea. Instead of the humiliation of Thebes and the abasement of her pride and insolence, the walls of your own allies the Phocians were demolished, and demolished by those very Thebans whom Aeschines in his speech had sent to live in scattered villages.
Demosthenes, Against Aristocrates, section 200 (search)
Or take Perdiccas, who was reigning in Macedonia at the time of the Persian invasion, and who destroyed the Persians on their retreat from Plataea, and made the defeat of the King irreparable. They did not resolve that any man should be liable to seizure who killed Perdiccas, the man who for our sake had provoked the enmity of the great King; they gave him our citizenship, and that was all. The truth is that in those days to be made a citizen of Athens was an honor so precious in the eyes of the world that, to earn that favour alone, men were ready to render to you those memorable services. Today it is so worthless that not a few men who have already received it have wrought worse mischief to you than your declared enemies.
Diodorus Siculus, Library, Book XI, Contents of the Eleventh Book of Diodorus (search)
. —How the Carthaginians with great armaments made war upon Sicily (chaps. 20-21). —How Gelon, after outgeneralling the barbarians, slew some of them and took others captive (chaps. 22-23). —How Gelon, when the Carthaginians sued for peace, exacted money of them and then concluded the peace (chaps. 24-26). —Judgement passed on the Greeks who distinguished themselves in the war (chap. 27). —The battle of the Greeks against Mardonius and the Persians about Plataea and the victory of the Greeks (chaps. 27-39). —The war which the Romans waged against the Aequi and the inhabitants of Tusculum (chap. 40). —On the construction of the Peiraeus by Themistocles (chaps. 41-50). —On the aid which king Hiero dispatched to the Cymaeans (chap. 51). —On the war which arose between the Tarantini and the Iapyges (chap. 52). —How Thrasydaeus, the son of Theron and tyrant of the Acragantini, was defeated by the Syracus
Diodorus Siculus, Library, Book XI, Chapter 14 (search)
naea ("of the fore-shrine") lay just outside the shrine of Apollo (Paus. 10.8.6). a trophy on which they inscribed the following elegiac lines: To serve as a memorial to war, The warder-off of men, and as a witness To victory the Delphians set me up, Rendering thanks to Zeus and Phoebus who Thrust back the city-sacking ranks of Medes And threw their guard about the bronze-crowned shrine. Meanwhile Xerxes, as he passed through Boeotia, laid waste the territory of the Thespiaeans and burned Plataea which was without habitants; for the residents of these two cities had fled in a body into the Peloponnesus. After this he entered Attica and ravaged the countryside, and then he razed Athens to the ground and sent up in flames the temples of the gods. And while the king was concerned with these affairs, his fleet sailed from Euboea to Attica, having sacked on the way both Euboea and the coast of Attica.
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