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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 41 3 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 2: Two Years of Grim War. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 37 3 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 34 2 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 33 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 30 6 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 29 7 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 27 3 Browse Search
John G. Nicolay, A Short Life of Abraham Lincoln, condensed from Nicolay and Hayes' Abraham Lincoln: A History 21 1 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 16 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 14 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for David D. Porter or search for David D. Porter in all documents.

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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 30: (search)
ved them of ammunition and provisions, without which they could not fight. One portion of Admiral Porter's command — the Marine Brigade--is entitled to special mention. When he assumed command of eel merchant-steamers could be altered into gun-boats, the Navy Department having authorized Admiral Porter to purchase as many of these as he deemed requisite to put down the guerillas and protect lore inured to hardships and capable of long and rapid marches. In the latter part of June, Admiral Porter received information from deserters that General Price was moving with a large force from Arest terms. Maj.-Gen. Burnside and Brig.-Gen. Cox also wrote the warmest acknowledgements to Admiral Porter for the part Fitch had taken in the capture of Morgan. Fitch certainly demonstrated the imps some other date is appended thus (1864), (1865). Officers who received favorable notice in Admiral Porter's official report, dated July 13, 1863 (concerning the fall of Vicksburg and operations on t
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 38: review of the work done by the Navy in the year 1863. (search)
idable barriers against the advance of the Navy. When Vicksburg was invested in 1863 by the Army under Major General Grant, and a large naval force under Rear-Admiral Porter, many efforts were made by the latter officer to send vessels down to blockade the mouth of the Red River, and thus cut off supplies from Port Hudson and ViRio Grande, was so closely guarded by the Union Navy that blockade-running was reduced to very insignificant proportions. The Mississippi squadron, under Rear-Admiral Porter, had been actively engaged in the work of suppressing the Rebellion, and co-operated zealously with the Army whenever its services were needed. The captureve been relieved and liberated through the instrumentality of the gun-boats, acting by themselves or in earnest and cordial co-operation with the armies. Rear-Admiral Porter has well sustained the renown which the gallant and lamented Foote so nobly earned, and has carried forward to successful results a larger and more powerful
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 41: the Red River expedition, under Major-General N. P. Banks, assisted by the Navy under Rear-Admiral David D. Porter. (search)
. Banks, assisted by the Navy under Rear-Admiral David D. Porter. The origin, objects and pd Port Hudson, General Sherman proposed to Admiral Porter an expedition to Shreveport, La., via Red arge force into the interior of Louisiana, Admiral Porter determined there should be no want of floa of the Federal forces. The Black Hawk, Admiral Porter's flag-ship. Fortunately, as matters tnity. General Banks had been writing to Admiral Porter up to the latter part of February, 1864, this expedition regardless of consequences, Admiral Porter resolved to do every thing in his power toboats. The fleet of gun-boats, under Rear-Admiral Porter, starting out, followed by the army trahe enemy's forces in this region, he urged Admiral Porter to push on at once with the force they the Banks' flag-ship, was of the same name as Admiral Porter's flag-ship, an unpleasant circumstance, sdition wiser and poorer men. As long as Admiral Porter had been associated with Generals Grant an[2 more...]
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 42: Red River expedition.--continued. (search)
the Falls by the fleet.--report of Rear-Admiral David D. Porter.Flag-Ship Black Hawk, Mississippi S I enclose a copy of a communication from Admiral Porter which shows the condition of Red River andn in that quarter. Suffice to say, all Admiral Porter's letters recommended that no attempt shouunsel with Generals Sherman and Steele and Admiral Porter as to the best manner of carrying out the , and enabled the fleet of gun-boats under Admiral Porter to pass up to Alexandria without firing a their commanding officer (Cooke) informing Admiral Porter that his wheel had been disabled by a shelks on going that route that he appealed to Admiral Porter in such a manner that the latter could notzen over. We went from General Emory's to Admiral Porter's boat, and General Smith told the Admiral it safe through to the Mississippi River. Admiral Porter replied that he was not surprised to hear pi Squadron, January 1st, 1864. Rear-Admiral David D. Porter. Captain A. M. Pennock, Fleet-Ca[14 more...]
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 44: battle of Mobile Bay. (search)
ve Mobile. They also reported at Mobile four ironplated floating batteries, one of them sunk. These reports were constantly brought down concerning Buchanan's force, and they were far from reassuring to the Union commander, who up to this time had not received a single iron-clad. It was not until July 26th that the arrival of the Monitor Manhattan was reported. She was under Sand Island, in charge of gun-boats. The two double-turreted Monitors, Winnebago and Chickasaw, sent from Admiral Porter's fleet on the Mississippi, were in New Orleans, and would be off Mobile about the 30th of July. The Tecumseh was not yet heard from, and the Army which Farragut had asked for to co-operate with him was still in New Orleans. When the latter should arrive, Farragut would be quite ready to commence operations against the defences of Mobile. The arrival of the Manhattan was an assurance that Buchanan would not leave the bay to attack the Federal wooden ships, which Buchanan at no time
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 45: the cruise of the Sumter and the havoc she committed. (search)
gazed proudly on the Stars and Bars floating from her peak. Having received his sailing orders, Semmes dropped down to the forts preparatory to getting to sea past the blockading vessels at the mouths of the Mississippi — the Powhatan. Lieutenant D. D. Porter, at Southwest Pass, and the Brooklyn, Commander Charles H. Poor, at Pass à l'outre. Semmes' sailing orders were brief and to the purpose. He was to burn, sink and destroy. within the limits prescribed by the laws of nations, and with Abby Bradford was sent in charge of a prize-crew to New Orleans, to report her arrival to Commodore Rousseau, delivering to him the prize-papers, seals unbroken, etc. The vessel reached Barrataria Bay, but was recaptured by the Powhatan, Lieutenant D. D. Porter, and restored to her owners. Semmes did not burn the Abby Bradford, because, as he says, I only resorted to that practice when it became evident there was nothing else to do. As soon as Lieutenant Porter ascertained from the crew of
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 49: first attack on Fort Fisher.--destruction of the confederate ram Albemarle, etc. (search)
the Army to co-operate with the Navy. Rear-Admiral Porter assumes command of the North Atlantic se Navy in the reduction of Fort Fisher. Admiral Porter had asked for but eight thousand troops, a While these operations were in progress, Admiral Porter was engaged in perfecting the organizationer came from the Navy Department directing Admiral Porter to investigate some charges preferred by M the latter's report had been forwarded by Admiral Porter to the Department: Navy Department, off Masonboroa Inlet. In the meantime, Admiral Porter had put into Beaufort, N. C., to give anotGeneral Butler sent General Weitzel to see Admiral Porter, and arrange the programme for the day. Itr we have quoted, from General Butlerto Rear-Admiral Porter, the former says: Both General Weitbled is ready to lend its co-operation; Rear-Admiral Porter will remain off Fort Fisher, continuingmander, Commanding U. S. S. Seneca. Rear-Admiral David D. Porter, Commanding North Atlantic Squadron[37 more...]
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 50: Second attack on Fort Fisher. (search)
A no. 1 engineer, as, no doubt, he was. Admiral Porter offered to do all he could for General Tert very much in insuring accuracy of fire. David D. Porter, Rear-Admiral, Commanding North Atlantic Fisher by the U. S. Navy under Rear Admiral D. D. Porter. Jan. 13-14, 1865. showing the position ofvery respectfully, your obedient servant, David D. Porter, Rear-Admiral. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretvery respectfully, your obedient servant, David D. Porter, Rear-Admiral. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretervant, H. K. Thatcher, Commodore. Rear-Admiral David D. Porter. Commanding N. A. Station. Repoposition during the night. By orders from Admiral Porter, the iron-clad division commenced the actiCaptain United States Marine Corps. Rear-Admiral David D. Porter, Commanding North Atlantic Squadron. Selfridge, Lieutenant-Commander. Rear-Admiral David D. Porter, Commanding North Atlantic Squadron. Cushing, Lieutenant, Commanding. Rear-Admiral David D. Porter, Commanding North Atlantic Squadron[25 more...]
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 51: effects of the fall of Fort Fisher, and criticisms on General Badeau's military history of General Grant. (search)
entirely close the harbor against the entrance of blockade-runners. To secure the possession of this land required the co-operation of a land force, which I agreed to furnish. Immediately commenced the assemblage in Hampton Roads, under Admiral D. D. Porter, of one of the most formidable armada ever collected for concentration upon one given point. This necessarily attracted the attention of the enemy, as well as that of the loyal North; and through the imprudence of the public press, and,e attempt to capture Fort Fisher, N. C., and Wilmington ultimately, if the fort falls. You will then proceed with as little delay as possible to the naval fleet lying off Cape Fear River. and report the arrival of yourself and command to Admiral D. D. Porter, commanding the North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. It is exceedingly desirable that the most complete understanding should exist between yourself and the naval commander. I suggest, therefore, that you consult with Admiral Porter free
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