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Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Sherman's campaign in Georgia-siege of Atlanta --death of General McPherson-attempt to capture Andersonville-capture of Atlanta (search)
-Mississippi. The most easterly of these was the Department of the Ohio, General Schofield commanding; the next was the Department of the Cumberland, General Thomasver sixty thousand men of the Army of the Cumberland, was at Chattanooga; and Schofield, with about fourteen thousand men, was at Knoxville. With these three armiesI have no doubt that he would have succeeded. Sherman's plan was to start Schofield, who was farthest back, a few days in advance from Knoxville, having him moveh [of August] Sherman endeavored to get upon the railroad to our right, where Schofield was in command, but these attempts failed utterly. General Palmer was chargethe cause of this failure, to a great extent, by both General Sherman and General Schofield; but I am not prepared to say this, although a question seems to have arisen with Palmer as to whether Schofield had any right to command him. If he did raise this question while an action was going on, that act alone was exceedingly repr
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, The campaign in Georgia-Sherman's March to the sea-war anecdotes-the March on Savannah- investment of Savannah-capture of Savannah (search)
ontingency of the latter moving the other way while he was moving south, by making Thomas strong enough to hold Tennessee and Kentucky. I, myself, was thoroughly satisfied that Hood would go north, as he did. On the 2d of November I telegraphed Sherman authorizing him definitely to move according to the plan he had proposed: that is, cutting loose from his base, giving up Atlanta and the railroad back to Chattanooga. To strengthen Thomas he sent Stanley (4th corps) back, and also ordered Schofield, commanding the Army of the Ohio, twelve thousand strong, to report to him. In addition to this, A. J. Smith, who, with two divisions of Sherman's army, was in Missouri aiding Rosecrans in driving the enemy from that State, was under orders to return to Thomas and, under the most unfavorable circumstances, might be expected to arrive there long before Hood could reach Nashville. In addition to this, the new levies of troops that were being raised in the North-west went to Thomas as rap
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, The battle of Franklin-the battle of Nashville (search)
ls at the end of October, 1864. Thomas sent Schofield with the 4th and 23d corps, together with tharted and moved in such a manner as to avoid Schofield, thereby turning his position. Hood had witlry, numbered about forty-five thousand men. Schofield had, of all arms, about thirty thousand. Thomas's orders were, therefore, for Schofield to watch the movements of the enemy, but not to fight be reinforced by Thomas himself. As soon as Schofield saw this movement of Hood's, he sent his traght skirmish but no battle. From this place Schofield then retreated to Franklin. He had sent his Spring Hill, for the night of the 29th. Schofield retreating from Columbia on the 29th passed in the hospital, and 702 prisoners besides. Schofield's loss, as officially reported, was 189 killsing. Thomas made no effort to reinforce Schofield at Franklin, as it seemed to me at the time ght out the battle there. He simply ordered Schofield to continue his retreat to Nashville, which
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Sherman's March North-Sheridan ordered to Lynchburg-Canby ordered to move against Mobile-movements of Schofield and Thomas-capture of Columbia, South Carolina-Sherman in the Carolinas (search)
ed to Lynchburg-Canby ordered to move against Mobile-movements of Schofield and Thomas-capture of Columbia, South Carolina-Sherman in the Care Thomas make a campaign into the heart of Alabama, I had ordered Schofield to Annapolis, Md., with his corps. The advance (six thousand) wihe 18th Terry moved on Wilmington. If Wilmington is captured, Schofield will go there. If not, he will be sent to New Bern. In either eput in command of all the troops in North and South Carolina. Schofield arrived at Annapolis in the latter part of January, but before sere connected with Raleigh by railroads which unite at Goldsboro. Schofield was to land troops at Smithville, near the mouth of the Cape Fearto bivouac; and there his men were destined to have a long rest. Schofield was there to meet him with the troops which had been sent to Wilmnforce Johnston, Sherman, with the reinforcements he now had from Schofield and Terry, would have been able to hold the Confederates at bay f
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, chapter 32 (search)
e men in the army could have saved us from destruction long ago, and nothing else can save us hereafter. If our independence shall be achieved, it will be done in spite of the obstructions with which the cause has been burdened by the stupidity or mismanagement of incompetent or dishonest men. The sufferings of the border Missourians. The people of Missouri, on the Kansas border, are being slaughtered without mercy under the authority of the Yankee commander of that department, Schofield. A letter to the St. Louis Republican (Yankee) says: On Sunday last the desire for blood manifested itself in the southeastern part of Jackson County, not far from the village of Lone Jack. Although it was Sunday, the people of that region, alarmed and terror-stricken by threats from Kansas, and cruel edicts from headquarters of the district, were hard at work straining every nerve to get ready to leave their homes before this memorable 9th day of September, 1863. One party of t
ing of July 22, 1864. The order read as follows: Three miles and a half east of Atlanta, Ga., Major-General John A. Logan, Commanding Fifteenth Army Corps. The enemy having evacuated their works in front of our lines, the supposition of Major-General Sherman is that they have given up Atlanta without entering the town. You will take a route to the left of that taken by the enemy, and try to cut off a portion of them, while they are pressed in the rear and on the right by Generals Schofield and Thomas. Major-General Sherman desires and expects a vigorous pursuit. Very respectfully your obedient servant, James B. Mcpherson, Major-General. It was proved afterward to have been wholly impracticable. With the sounds of the guns of the attacking enemy coming from every direction, General Logan, as the ranking officer, and with only the orders which he received from McPherson a few minutes before he was killed, assumed command. General Logan rode with magic swi
Mrs. John A. Logan, Reminiscences of a Soldier's Wife: An Autobiography, Chapter 15: (search)
to the position they were to occupy at the tables. At a bugle-call, the line moved to the dining-room, headed by Grant and Sherman, followed by Sheridan, Logan, Schofield, and the long list of illustrious soldiers and distinguished citizens. At the speaker's table, beginning at the south end, were Reverend David Swing, Reverend Doctor Thomas, Judge Dickey, Judge Drummond, Governor Cullom, Bishop Fallows, General R. J. Oglesby, General C. C. Auger, Senator Don Cameron, General Schofield, General W. Q. Gresham, General Logan, General Sherman, General Grant, General Sheridan, Rear-Admiral Stevens, Judge A. Taft, General Pope, General Crook, General Robinson, teer soldiers ; Emery A. Storrs, The patriotic people ; General Thomas C. Fletcher, Woman ; Mark Twain, Our babies ; General Woodford, Army of the Potomac ; General Schofield, The Army. After the cheering, as the speakers concluded, the bands gave some martial air, which frequently started the whole company to singing, and, as
Mrs. John A. Logan, Reminiscences of a Soldier's Wife: An Autobiography, Chapter 16: (search)
ewey, Mrs. John B. Henderson, wife of ex-Senator Henderson of Missouri, one of the most remarkable women of her time, Miss Taylor, Mrs. Beale, wife of General Beale, Mrs. Hill, wife of Senator Hill of Colorado, Miss Edith Harlan, Miss Schurz, Mrs. Schofield, wife of General Schofield, Mrs. Lord, Mrs. Shellabarger, wife of Judge Shellabarger, Mrs. Waite, wife of Chief Justice Waite, and Miss Waite, Mrs. Don Cameron, Mrs. Dahlgren, Mrs. and Miss Blaine, Mrs. Jewett, Mrs. John Davis, Olivia Briggs,General Schofield, Mrs. Lord, Mrs. Shellabarger, wife of Judge Shellabarger, Mrs. Waite, wife of Chief Justice Waite, and Miss Waite, Mrs. Don Cameron, Mrs. Dahlgren, Mrs. and Miss Blaine, Mrs. Jewett, Mrs. John Davis, Olivia Briggs, Mary Clemmer Ames, the daughters of Senator Frelinghuysen, Mrs. Vinnie Ream Hoxie, and many of the wives of high officials, who were women of decided ability and rare accomplishments. Under President Arthur foreign relations were conducted by Secretary Frelinghuysen in a friendly spirit. President Arthur favored reform in the civil service, but vetoed the Chinese bill and the bill making appropriations for rivers and harbors. The President convened the Senate on October 10, 1881, after P
Sherman's March through the Carolinas the burning of Charleston and Columbia arrival at Goldsboro Junction with Schofield visit to Grant While Grant was making his marches, fighting his battles, and carrying on his siege operations in ddle of January, 1865, a naval expedition captured Fort Fisher at the mouth of Cape Fear River, an army corps under General Schofield was brought east from Thomas's Army of the Tennessee, and sent by sea to the North Carolina coast to penetrate into Sherman's advance to Goldsboro, where he arrived on March 23, forming a junction with the Union army sent by sea under Schofield, that had reached the same point the previous day. The third giant stride of Sherman's great campaign was thus happssee. Military affairs were plainly in a condition which justified Sherman in temporarily devolving his command on General Schofield and hurrying by sea to make a brief visit for urgent consultation with General Grant at his headquarters before Ric
execution of private vengeance. President Lincoln drew a vivid picture of the chronic disorders in Missouri in reply to complaints demanding the removal of General Schofield from local military command: We are in civil war. In such cases there always is a main question; but in this case that question is a perplexing compoules, those chroniclers of current events, will show that the evils now complained of were quite as prevalent under Fremont, Hunter, Halleck, and Curtis, as under Schofield . . I do not feel justified to enter upon the broad field you present in regard to the political differences between radicals and conservatives. From time to together. The convention leaders who controlled that body inquired of the President whether he would sustain their action. To this he made answer in a letter to Schofield dated June 22, 1863: Your despatch, asking in substance whether, in case Missouri shall adopt gradual emancipation, the general government will protect sl
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