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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 2 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 2 2 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 15. 2 0 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 1 1 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. 1 1 Browse Search
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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 9: the beginnings of verse, 1610-1808 (search)
ymes. Despite occasional variety of form in six-line stanza or quatrain, there is little variety of tone or style; and in all these thousands of lines scarcely a line of genuine poetry, or a single poem worth preservation in its entirety. The succession of these elegies is surprisingly unbroken for at least forty years. Both authors and subjects are in the main the divines who controlled the destinies of New England and who provided its literature. When such an elegy as that on the Rev. Thomas Shepard by the Rev. Urian Oakes, president of Harvard, is discovered amid this dreary elegiac waste, its merits are sure to be exaggerated. This poem in fifty six-line stanzas, though commonplace in thought and style, is not without pathos, and gives an impression of sincerity. But the Rev. Urian Oakes himself was not so fortunate in his elegist, no less a person than the Rev. Cotton Mather, the most prolific elegist of his time. His elegy on Oakes reaches a length of over four hundred l
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index. (search)
(N. P. Willis), 243 n. Self, 230 Self-Reliance, 336, 352 Sella, 263 n., 273, 281 Seneca, 116 Seneca Lake, 279 Sentiments of a British American, 127 Sertorius, the Roman patriot, 224 Seventy-six, 309 Sewall, Samuel, 48, 54 Shaftesbury, 93, 102, 109, I16 Shakespeare, 4, 12, 110, 112, 118, 211, 265 Sharpe, Colonel, 224 She would be a soldier, 220, 226 Shelburne, Lord, 91 Shelley, 261, 268, 274, 279, 290, 326, 346 Shenstone, 176, 178, 178 n. Shepard, Rev., Thomas, 153 Sheppard Lee, 311 Sherman, Roger, 148 Sherman, General W. T., 317 Shipley, Bishop, 91 Shippen, Joseph, 122 Shirley, Governor, 106 Sidney, Algernon, 105, i18 Sievers, 275 Sigismund of Transylvania, 18 Sigurd the Volsung, 261 Silence Dogood, 94, 113 Silsbee, Joshua, 227 Simms, W. G., 224 n., 231, 307, 308, 312-318, 319, 324 Simonides, 359 Simple Cobbler of Aggawam, the, 39 Sinners in the hands of an angry God, 60 Sir Charles Grandison,
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature, Chapter 1: the Puritan writers (search)
se to expression which, ultimately developed, creates literature. ProfessorWendell says truly of Mather that he frequently wrote with a rhythmical beauty which recalls the enthusiastic spontaneity of Elizabethan English, so different from the English which came after the Civil War. It is when a Puritan clergyman ceases to be theological that he is most apt to touch our hearts and delight our ears. We find in Mather, for instance, this rhythmical beauty when he describes the career of Thomas Shepard, the first minister of Cambridge, as a trembling walk with God, or gives this picture (1702) of what he calls The conversation of gentlemen : There seems no need of adding anything but this, that when gentlemen occasionally meet together, why should not their conversation correspond with their superior station? Methinks they should deem it beneath persons of their quality to employ the conversation on trifling impertinences, or in such a way that, if it were secretly taken in shor
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature, Index. (search)
Concord, Battle of, 41. Congress, Continental, 49. Congress, General, 45, 79. Conspiracy of Pontiac, extract from Parkman's, 121. Constitution, Federal, 51, 52. Contemplations, Anne Bradstreet's, 12. Conversation of gentlemen, Shepard's, 19. Cooper, James Fenimore, 92-100, 103, 129, 204, 236, 239, 272. Coquette, Hannah Webster's, 92. Cotton Boll, Timrod's, 205. Courtship of miles Standish, Longfellow's, 142, 144. Crayon M31scellanies, Irving's, 87. Curtis, Geo4. Serene I Fold my hands, Burroughs's, 264. Seven Pines, Battle of, 217. Sewall, Samuel, 27-35. Seward, Miss, Anna, 75, 259. Shakespeare, 1, 108, 138. Shelley, 72, 177, 183, 215, 223, 258, 261, 277, 280. Shelley, Mrs., 71. Shepard, Thomas, 19. Sherman, Gen. W. T., 101. Simms, William Gilmore, 204, 206. Skeleton in armor, Longfellow's, 142. Sketch book, Irving's, 85, 86, 90, 103. Sky Walk, Brown's, 70. Smith, Capt., John, 7. Smith, Joseph, 69. Smoke, Thoreau's, 2
n them, but to those members of their own company who developed independent ways of thinking. The list of motives for emigration ran the whole gamut, from missionary fervor for converting the savages, down through a commendable desire for gain, to the perhaps no less praiseworthy wish to escape a debtor's prison or the pillory. A few of the colonists were rich. Some were beggars or indentured servants. Most of them belonged to the middle class. John Harvard was the son of a butcher; Thomas Shepard, the son of a grocer; Roger Williams, the son of a tailor. But all three were university bred and were natural leaders of men. Once arrived in the wilderness, the pioneer life common to all of the colonists began instantly to exert its slow, irresistible pressure upon their minds and to mould them into certain ways of thinking and feeling. Without some perception of these modes of thought and emotion a knowledge of the spirit of our literature is impossible. Take, for instance,
Bliss Perry, The American spirit in lierature: a chronicle of great interpreters, Chapter 2: the first colonial literature (search)
om Hawthorne's The Minister's black Veil and The Scarlet letter. Yet it must be said that men like Hooker and Cotton, Shepard and Norton, had every instinct and capacity for leadership. With the notable exception of Hooker, such men were aristocne of Hooker's successors has called him a son of thunder and a son of consolation by turns. The same may be said of Thomas Shepard, another graduate of Emmanuel College in the old Cambridge, who became the soul-melting preacher of the newer Cambridial and political influence than to his literary power. Yet even that was thought commanding. Trained, like Hooker and Shepard, at Emmanuel College, and fresh from the rectorship of St. Botolph's in the Lincolnshire Boston, John Cotton dominated t-enduring and beneficent life in the flourishing town of Providence in 1684. He had already outlived Cotton and Hooker, Shepard and Winthrop, by more than thirty years. Inevitably men began, toward the end of the century, to take stock of the great
Theodore, 243 Roughing it, Clemens 10, 237 Rowlandson, Mary, 39 Rules for Reducing a great Empire to a Small one, Franklin 58 Russell, Irwin, 246 Salem witchcraft, 43 Salmagundi papers, Irving and Paulding 91 Sanborn, F. B., 142 Sandys, George, 27 Scarlet letter, the, Hawthorne 7, 30, 145, 146, 148, 149-50 School-days, Whittier 158 Scott, Sir, Walter, 95 Scribner's monthly, 256 Scudder, Horace, 169 Seaweed, Longfellow 156 Sewell, Samuel, Judge, 47-48 Shepard, Thomas, 16, 31-32 Short story, the, 261-62 Sill, E. R., 257 Simms, W. G., 245, 246 Simple Cobbler of Agawam, the, Ward 37 Sinners in the hands of an Angry God, Edwards 50 Skeleton in Armor, the, Longfellow 155 Sketch book, Irving 89, 91 Skipper Ireson's Ride, Whittier 161 Slavery, influence on literature, 207 et seq. Slavery in Massachusetts, Thoreau 137 Smith, F. H., 247 Smith, John, 8-10, 20,38 Smith, Sydney, quoted, 88-89 Snow-bound, Whittier 158, 161-162 S
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Book III (continued) (search)
s were almost entirely religious in character. The first monument of American scholarship and printing ability, for instance, is The Holy Bible . . . translated into the Indian language, Cambridge, 1663. Six years later from the same press appeared what seems to be our first original book not strictly religious in character, Nathaniel Morton's New England's Memorial. Moreover this work announces that it is Printed for H. Usher of Boston. Urian Oakes's Elegie upon the death of the Reverend Mr. Thomas Shepard, See Book I, Chap. IX. in some respects the best poem produced in the colonies before the eighteenth century, dates from 1677. As early as 1693, at least, book dealers had begun to sell private libraries, for in that year appeared The Library of the late Reverend and learned Mr. Samuel Lee . . . Exposed . . . to sale, by Duncan Campbell, Boston. At Boston also was issued in 1717 A catalogue of curious and valuable books, belonging to the late Reverend & learned Mr. Ebenez
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index (search)
229 n., 499 Edwin Brothertoft, 68 Eelking, 577 Eggleston, Edward, 75-76, 121, 188, 191-92, 417, 540 Egyptian sketch-book, 25 Ehrliche Menschen, 582 Eight hour movement, the, 438 Ein lateinischer Bauer, 582 Ein verliebtes Girren der trostlosen Seele in der Morgendammerung, 573 n. El Capitan, 286 Elder, Wm., 436 Eldorado, or adventures in the path of Empire, 155 Elections in Germany, 600 Electra, 461 Electricity, 286 Elegie upon the death of the Reverend Mr. Thomas Shepard, 533 Elementary Latin composition (Allen and Greenough), 463 Elements of geography (Morse), 401 Elements of political economy (Newman), 434 Elements of political economy (Perry), 435 Elements of political economy (Raymond), 431 Elements of political economy (Wayland), 434 Elfin knight, the, 507 El Gringo, 132 Eliot, Chas. W., 177, 239, 354, 417 Eliot, Jared, 427 Eliot, John, 389, 575 Ellet, Charles, Jr., 434 Elliott, A. Marshall, 459 Elli
Cambridge sketches (ed. Estelle M. H. Merrill), Historic churches and homes of Cambridge. (search)
ar church edifice was built near Governor Dudley's house, and Mr. Thomas Shepard was ordained pastor, 1636. At about the same time was establl, later developed into Harvard College. The first members of Mr. Shepard's church were men prominent in the state, among them Henry Dunstr place of worship here, many Church-of-England men held pews in Mr. Shepard's Church, and kept them down to the time when Christ Church was unded. There are many records of this time, preserved partly in Mr. Shepard's own handwriting, in a book possessed by Dr. McKenzie. In ShShepard's time came the troubles over Mrs. Anne Hutchinson and her heresies, settled by a synod held in this church. In 1636 Harvard Collegelony were chosen to take orders for the college, and of these were Shepard, Cotton, Wilson, Harlakenden, Stoughton, Dudley and Winthrop. Thuexico; Elijah Corlet, first master of the Faire Grammar School; Thomas Shepard, first pastor in Cambridge; also Jonathan Mitchell, Nathaniel G
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