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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 4 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Name Index of Commands 4 0 Browse Search
Mrs. John A. Logan, Reminiscences of a Soldier's Wife: An Autobiography 4 2 Browse Search
Robert Stiles, Four years under Marse Robert 2 0 Browse Search
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results in the last year of the Civil War. It was the unification of the Federal army under Ulysses S. Grant. His son, in the pages that follow, repeats the businesslike agreement with President Lincoln which made possible the wielding of all the Union armies as one mighty weapon. The structure of Volume II reflects the Civil War situation thus changed in May, 1864. No longer were battles to be fought here and there unrelated; but a definite movement was made by Grant Versus Lee on the 4th of May, accompanied by the simultaneous movements of Butler, Sherman, and Sigel — all under the absolute control of the man who kept his headquarters near those of Meade, Commander of the Army of the Potomac. Against such concentrated strokes the enfeebled Confederacy could not stand. Only the utter courage of leaders and soldiers innately brave, who were fighting for a cause they felt meant home no less than principle, prolonged the struggle during the tragic year ending with May, 1865.
Contents   page Map--Theatre of Georgia and the Carolinas CAMPAIGNS2 Frontispiece--A shot that Startled WASHINGTON4 introduction   Frederick Dent Grant13 Part I Grant Versus Lee   Henry W. Elson   the battle in the WILDERNESS21  Spotsylvania and the Bloody Angle51  attack and repulse at Cold Harbor79 Part II the simultaneous movements   Henry W. Elson   Drewry's Bluff IMPREGNABLE93  to Atlanta — Sherman Versus JOHNSTON99  the last conflicts in the SHENANDOAH139 Part III closing in   Henry W. Elson   Charleston, the unconquered PORT169  the investment of Petersburg175  Sherman's final CAMPAIGNS209 Part IV from war to peace   Henry W. Elson   Nashville — the end in Tennessee   the siege and fall of Petersburg   Appomattox  Part V engagements of the Civil War from May, 1864, to May, 1865   George L. Kilmer  Photographic descriptions thr
mes as the left wing, the Army of the Potomac as the center, and the troops operating under General Sherman as the right wing; all other troops being considered as cooperative columns. He believed tdea, orders were given to the various commanders — on the 2d of April to Butler; on the 4th, to Sherman, and on the 9th, to Meade. In all these orders the same general ideas were expressed. To Butly . . . to operate on the south side of James River, Richmond being your objective point. To Sherman he wrote: It is my design, if the enemy keep quiet and allow me to take the initiative inuarding Richmond, while that of Johnston was at Dalton, in the northern part of Georgia, facing Sherman and defending Atlanta, a great railroad center and a point of concentration of supplies for theCity Point, threatening Petersburg. The army in the Shenandoah valley had already started, and Sherman was about to move. As the Army of the Potomac was marching through the Wilderness it was att
ed his commission. He now planned the final great double movement of the war. Taking control of the whole campaign against Lee, but leaving the Army of the Potomac under Meade's direct command, he chose the strongest of his corps commanders, W. T. Sherman, for the head of affairs in the West. Grant's immediate objects were to defeat Lee's army and to capture Richmond, the latter to be accomplished by General Butler and the Army of the James; Sherman's object was to crush Johnston, to seize thdversary and Richmond. Meanwhile, Burnside, followed by Wright, marched on the evening of the 21st, and next day came up with Grant's headquarters at Guiney's Station. Here he found Grant sitting on the porch, reading the despatch that told of Sherman's capture of Kingston, Georgia, and his crossing of the Etowah River. Burnside was ordered forward to Bethel Church and thence to Ox Ford, on the North Anna, there on the 24th to be held in check by Lee's faultless formation. troops and was d
by the Telegraph Road, strike Hancock alone, or at most Hancock and Warren. But Lee, fearing perhaps to risk a general contest, remained strictly on the defensive, moving his troops out along the Telegraph Road to make sure of keeping between his adversary and Richmond. Meanwhile, Burnside, followed by Wright, marched on the evening of the 21st, and next day came up with Grant's headquarters at Guiney's Station. Here he found Grant sitting on the porch, reading the despatch that told of Sherman's capture of Kingston, Georgia, and his crossing of the Etowah River. Burnside was ordered forward to Bethel Church and thence to Ox Ford, on the North Anna, there on the 24th to be held in check by Lee's faultless formation. troops and was defeated, while on the other side of the salient Wright succeeded in driving Anderson back. The question has naturally arisen why that salient was regarded of such vital importance as to induce the two chief commanders to force their armies into su
y on the breach of the gun stands General William Tecumseh Sherman at the close of one of the war's While it was in progress, McPherson, sent by Sherman, had deftly marched around Johnston matreating. But General Jeff C. Davis, sent by Sherman, took Rome on May 17th and destroyed valuabletingencies — that he might catch a portion of Sherman's army separated from the rest; that Sherman these were stealthily set up and launched by Sherman's Twenty-third Corps near the mouth of Soap Ca model of defensive warfare, declares one of Sherman's own division commanders, Jacob D. Cox. Theeturned to Memphis and made another start for Sherman, when he was suddenly turned back and sent tolure Sherman on into advancing incautiously. Sherman and McPherson had so decided when Hood began that remained was destroyed. The noise that Sherman heard that night was the blowing up of the roHood placed himself between Andersonville and Sherman. In the early days of September the Federa[113 more...]
rmy, but the uniform is as near full dress as Sherman ever came. He hated fine clothes, says Gener defeated and La Grange was made prisoner. Sherman's chief object in these demonstrations, it wi must abandon his entrenchments and intercept Sherman. Moving by the only two good roads, Johnstonte works were invested by the greater part of Sherman's army and it was evident that a battle was iherman from a direct attack upon Atlanta. If Sherman could get successfully across that river, thea model of defensive warfare, declares one of Sherman's own division commanders, Jacob D. Cox. Theent turned longingly, expectantly, toward General Sherman and his hundred thousand men before Atlan the occupation, when this picture was taken, Sherman's men completed the work of destruction. feated with heavy loss. A month passed and Sherman had made little progress toward capturing Atload. Here, four hundred miles from his base, Sherman, having accomplished in four months what he s[113 more...]
sed into history. Charleston was never captured. It was evacuated only after Sherman's advance through the heart of South Carolina had done what over five hundred prospect, no wonder the indomitable Southern bravery was tried to the utmost. Sherman was advancing. The beginning of the end was near. The busiest place in Dcoln set out to see a grand review and witnessed a desperate battle. Here General Sherman, fresh from his victorious march from Atlanta to the sea, came up in the ltrenchments in front of Petersburg. Sherman's final campaigns W. T. Sherman on Horseback. Waiting for the march to the sea: Camp of the first Michigthat had to be met and defeated, or the war was necessarily at an end.--General W. T. Sherman, in his Memoirs. The march to the sea, in which General William T. General William T. Sherman won undying fame in the Civil War, is one of the greatest pageants in the world's warfare — as fearful in its destruction as it is historic in its import. Bu
y Grim-Visaged war along the palmetto shore-line of Charleston harbor Prodigies of talent, audacity, intrepidity, and perseverance were exhibited in the attack, as in the defense of the city, which will assign to the siege of Charleston an exceptional place in military annals. Thus spoke the expert of the French Journal of military science in 1865, only a few months after this attack and defense had passed into history. Charleston was never captured. It was evacuated only after Sherman's advance through the heart of South Carolina had done what over five hundred and fifty-seven days of continuous attack and siege by the Federal army and navy could not do — make it untenable. When, on the night of February 17, 1865, Captain H. Huguenin, lantern in hand, made his last silent rounds of the deserted Fort and took the little boat for shore, there ended the four years defense of Fort Sumter, a feat of war unsurpassed in ancient or modern times — eclipsing (says an English mili
allowance first given to each separate Southern soldier. Outnumbered three to one in efficient men, with the Cold of winter coming on and its attendant hardships in prospect, no wonder the indomitable Southern bravery was tried to the utmost. Sherman was advancing. The beginning of the end was near. The busiest place in Dixie city Point, just after its capture by Butler. From June, 1864, until April, 1865, city Point, at the juncture of the Appomattox and the James, was a Point of thousand veterans in gray opposed to them. A warship lying where these vessels lie could drop a 12-inch shell into Petersburg in modern days. From here President Lincoln set out to see a grand review and witnessed a desperate battle. Here General Sherman, fresh from his victorious march from Atlanta to the sea, came up in the little gunboat Bat to visit Grant. During the last days, when to the waiting world peace dawned in sight, city Point, to all intents and purposes, was the National cap
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