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nd army up the Peninsula, in connection with Burnside's successes and captures in North Carolina, See pages 73-81. had rendered the possession of Norfolk by the Rebels no longer tenable. To hold it by any force less than an army would be simply exposing that force to capture or destruction at the pleasure of our strategists. Gen. Wool, commanding at Fortress Monroe, having organized an expedition designed to reduce that important city, led it thither on the 10th; finding the bridge over Tanner's creek on fire, but no enemy to dispute possession of Norfolk, which was quietly surrendered by its Mayor. The Navy Yard and Portsmouth were in like manner repossessed; the Rebels, ere they left, destroying every thing that would burn, partially blowing up the Dry Dock, and completely destroying their famous ironclad known to us as the Merrimac. May 11, 5 A. M. They left about 200 cannon, including 39 of large caliber at Craney Island, and those in the Sewell's Point batteries, which, t
ted in this struggle 37,977 infantry, 3,200 cavalry, and 2,223 artillery: total, 43,400 ; and states his; losses as follows: killed, 1,533; Among our killed, beside those already mentioned, were Cols. Jones, 24th Ohio, McKee, 3d Ky., Williams, 25th Ill., Harrington, 27th Ill., Stem, 101st Ohio, and Millikin, 3d Ohio cavalry. Among our wounded, beside those already named, were Cols. Forman, 15th Ky., Humphreys. 88th Ind. Alexander, 21st Ill., Hines, 57th Ind., Blake, 40th Ind., and Lt.-Col. Tanner, 22d Ind. wounded, 7,245; total, 8,778, or fully 20 per cent, of the number engaged. He adds that his provostmarshal says his loss of prisoners will fall below 2,800. He says nothing of prisoners taken by him, though we certainly did take at least 500, beside wounded. He judges that the Rebels had fifteen per cent. advantage in their choice of ground and knowledge of the country; and says that they had present 132 regiments of infantry and 20 of cavalry, beside 24 smaller organizatio
d. It was now subjected to sharp musket-fire from the front, but as the enemy showed the national flag, (the corn concealing their uniform,) and as our troops had been seen in advance on our right, moving diagonally across our front, the order to cease firing was given, and a volunteer officer to go forward to ascertain who was in our front was called for. Lieuts. Geo. E. Curtis and Geo. H. Watts immediately stepped forward, and placing themselves one on each side of the color-bearer, (Corporal Tanner, company G,) carried the flag up the hill within twenty feet of the rebels, when the enemy fired, killing the corporal. Lieut. Curtis seized the colors and returned, followed by Lieut. Watts. The order to commence firing was then given, and Col. Steere sent me to the Sixteenth Connecticut to see if they would support us in a charge up the hill, but the corn being very thick and high, I could find no one to whom to apply. I returned to tell the Colonel that we must depend upon ourselv
d. It was now subjected to sharp musket-fire from the front, but as the enemy showed the national flag, (the corn concealing their uniform,) and as our troops had been seen in advance on our right, moving diagonally across our front, the order to cease firing was given, and a volunteer officer to go forward to ascertain who was in our front was called for. Lieuts. Geo. E. Curtis and Geo. H. Watts immediately stepped forward, and placing themselves one on each side of the color-bearer, (Corporal Tanner, company G,) carried the flag up the hill within twenty feet of the rebels, when the enemy fired, killing the corporal. Lieut. Curtis seized the colors and returned, followed by Lieut. Watts. The order to commence firing was then given, and Col. Steere sent me to the Sixteenth Connecticut to see if they would support us in a charge up the hill, but the corn being very thick and high, I could find no one to whom to apply. I returned to tell the Colonel that we must depend upon ourselv
ls, about half a mile behind our line of battle, and there await orders. He shortly after returned, and directed me to take my own battery, under command of Lieutenant Tanner, and Captain Brown's, under cammand of Lieutenant Plater, to the relief of some batteries occupying a position near the extreme left of the line formed by thisson. Staunton artillery, Lieutenant Garber--none killed or wounded; one horse disabled and one gun carriage, afterwards repaired. Courtney artillery, Lieutenant Tanner--one private killed; Lieutenant Tanner and six privates wounded; eight horses disabled. Captain Carrington's battery--four men wounded; seven horses disabLieutenant Tanner and six privates wounded; eight horses disabled. Captain Carrington's battery--four men wounded; seven horses disabled. Captain Dement's battery — none killed or wounded; four horses disabled. I am pleased to be able to say that all the officers and men under my command acted in a highly creditable manner, promptly and cheerfully obeying all orders, and standing to their posts. I have the honor to be, Very respectfully, Your most
l Wooster, One Hundred and First Ohio; Lieutenant-Colonel McKee, Fifteenth Wisconsin; Captain Carpenter, Eighth Wisconsin battery, and Captain McCulloch, Second Kentucky cavaly, of my staff, whose noble deeds of valor on the field, had already placed their names on the list of brave men. The history of the war will record no brighter names, and the country will mourn the loss of no more devoted patriots than these. Among the wounded are Colonel Alexander, Twenty-first Illinois ; Lieutenant-Colonel Tanner, Twenty-second Indiana; Captain Pinney, Fifth Wisconsin battery, and Captain Austin, Acting Assistant Adjutant-General, on the staff of Colonel Woodruff, whose names it affords me special gratification to mention. From the twenty-sixth of December, until the close of the engagement on the fourth of January, at Murfreesboro, no entire day elapsed that the division or some portion of it did not engage the enemy. During a great part of the time the weather was excessively inclemen
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 2.13, chapter 2.26 (search)
arly yet to say whether I shall like the House or not. If there is much behaviour like that of Dr. Tanner in it, I shall not; but it is ominous to me that the man can be permitted to behave so badly. er bench, behind our leaders, that I might be away from the neighbourhood of that ill-mannered Dr. Tanner, and not vis-à--vis to the scowling Radicals. I strode through the passages to the big anteferred slightly, by innuendo, to me, as being in the House, with a large knowledge of Africa. Dr. Tanner, contravening the usage of the House, cried out, That is Stanley! After Robertson, up rose d he! We are all proud of them! They are fine personalities, out and out! The impossible Dr. Tanner, however, found that he could make objections to them. I was quite thirty-five feet away from know. Oh, they are only snobs, etc., etc. There were sixty gentlemen on our side who heard Tanner, but all they said was Order! Order! This, to me, is a wonderful instance of the courtesy to b
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 2.13, Index (search)
; his adventure with a thief, 141; his last parting with Stanley, 142-144; sends a letter to Stanley, 145, 146; death of, 161. Stanley, Mrs., of New Orleans, 99-101, 111-113. Stanley-Cook exploration in Asia, 223, 224. Stanley Falls, 326. Stanley Pool, 329, 336. Stead, W. T., 455, 456. Story, Newton, 156, 165, 169, 170, 180, 193. Suez Canal, opening of, 245. Swinburne, A. B., 345. Syra, Island of, 230-236. Talbot, A., 456, 458. Tanganyika, Lake, 261, 262, 318, 319. Tanner, Dr., 468, 469, 473-475. Tasmania, Stanley visits, 434, 437, 438. Tay-pay, 475, 476. Taylor, Commissioner, 227. Teheran, 247. Tennant, Dorothy, married to Stanley, 423. See Stanley, Lady. Theodore, King, 229, 230. Thomas, Captain, Leigh, 17. Tiflis, 246. Tippu-Tib, 319-325, 364. Tomasson, 169, 180, 184. Tremeirchion, 42, 51. Uganda, 309-313, 405. Uganda Mission, 318. Uhha, 259, 260. Ujiji, 262. Valencia, Stanley at, 243. Vasari, his Machiavelli, 463.
th the 21st Louisiana and 10th South Carolina regiments, and afterwards as a hospital surgeon. Dr. Foard was medical director of the Army of Tennessee. Dr. Graham was surgeon of the Sixty-seventh North Carolina Infantry. Dr. Kellar was medical director of the Trans-Mississippi Department. Christopher Hamilton Tebault, M. D. Medical director A. J. Foard Surgeon Joseph Graham Medical director J. M. Kellar Druitt's Surgery, Bartlett On Fevers, Wood's Practice, Watson's Practice, Tanner's Practice, and a copy of the United States Dispensatory, by Wood & Bache. Occasional copies of The Confederate States medical and surgical Journal, reached field and hospital surgeons. It was published in Richmond by Ayres & Wade, with the approval and under the supervision of the Surgeon-General, monthly from January, 1864, until February, 1865. A complete file from which much important historical data can possibly be obtained, is now in the Library of the Surgeon-General's office at
th the 21st Louisiana and 10th South Carolina regiments, and afterwards as a hospital surgeon. Dr. Foard was medical director of the Army of Tennessee. Dr. Graham was surgeon of the Sixty-seventh North Carolina Infantry. Dr. Kellar was medical director of the Trans-Mississippi Department. Christopher Hamilton Tebault, M. D. Medical director A. J. Foard Surgeon Joseph Graham Medical director J. M. Kellar Druitt's Surgery, Bartlett On Fevers, Wood's Practice, Watson's Practice, Tanner's Practice, and a copy of the United States Dispensatory, by Wood & Bache. Occasional copies of The Confederate States medical and surgical Journal, reached field and hospital surgeons. It was published in Richmond by Ayres & Wade, with the approval and under the supervision of the Surgeon-General, monthly from January, 1864, until February, 1865. A complete file from which much important historical data can possibly be obtained, is now in the Library of the Surgeon-General's office at
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