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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Cheerful Yesterdays, Index. (search)
213. Stowell, Martin, 147, 148, 149, 151, 153, 156, 157, 191, 198, 215. Straub, Mr., 209. Straub, Miss, 209. Strauss, D. F., 10r. Stuart, Gilbert, 280. Sullivan, J. L., 263. Sumner, Charles, 53, 125, 146, 175, 196, 267. Suttle, C. F., 148. Swift, J. L., 151. Swinburne, A. C., 289. Swiveller, Dick, 30. Tacitus, C. C., 360. Tadema, Alma, 289. Talandier, M., 304, 305, 306, 309, 300. Taney, R. B., 238. Tappan, S. F., 204, 215. Taylor, Bayard, 0108, 293. Taylor, Henry, 29. Taylor, Tom, 312. Tennyson, Alfred, 67, 272, 287, 291, 292, 294, 295, 296, 314. Thackeray, W. M., 187, 313. Thaxter, Celia, 67. Thaxter, L. L., 66, 67, 76, 94. Thaxter, Roland, 67. Thaxter family, the, 75. Thayer and Eldridge, 230. Therese, Madame, 320. Thomas, C. G., 91. Thompson, William, 198. Thoreau, Miss, 170. Thoreau, H. D., 25, 53, 78, 91, 92, 114, 169, 170, 181, 279, 360. Ticknor, George, 12, 15, 49, 189. Ticknor, W. D., 176. Ticknor & Fields, 183. Tidd, C. P., 228, 229.
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Book III (continued) (search)
icapped the American drama. Daly scanned the German horizon for adaptations, as Dunlap had done before him; A. M. Palmer was as eager for the French play as were the English managers abroad, who would complacently have kept T. W. Robertson and Tom Taylor literary hacks at ten pounds a play, if they had not rebelled. When one puts down the titles of dramas which Augustin Daly (1838-1899) actually had a literary hand in, it is surprising how far afield from the American spirit he could get; with previous to 1860, became distinct. Only by these traditional marks could one recognize American drama of the early days. Until Howard's attempt at reality, New York society drama was either English or else crudely rustic, like Asa Trenchard in Taylor's Our American Cousin (Laura Keene's Theatre, 18 October, 1858). Over into this period of transition came the Yankee, the backwoodsman, the humorous lawyer of flush times. As Howard said, writing of the American drama, the native dramatists were
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index (search)
y parish, a, 88 Tales (Field, Eugene), 28 Tales of a traveller, I 12 Taliesin: a masque, 51 Talks to teachers, 421 Talvj. See Jakob, Therese von Tannenbaum, 497 Tappan, 229 Tarbell, Ida, 293, 317 Tarkington, Booth, 91, 288, 420 Tasso, 450 Tatler, the, 110 Taussig, F. W., 442 Taxation in American States and cities, 442 Taylor, Bayard 31, 36, 38-43, 44, 45, 48, 113, 128, 155, 163, 164, 314. 586 Taylor, Bert Leston, 21 Taylor, John, 432 S. H., 480 Taylor, Tom, 270, 275 Taylor, Zachary, 375 Tell it all, 143 Temperance town, a, 279 Temple, Mary, 101 Tenement House, a, 606 Ten great Religions, 211 Ten months a captive among Filipinos, 166 Tennyson, 35, 37, 38, 40, 41, 46, 54, 77, 487 Tenth annual report (Mann H.), 410 Ten times one is ten, 120 Tenting on the Plains, 160 Tent life in Siberia, 165 Ten years a cowboy, 161 Terhune, A. P., 165 Ternaux-Compans, 456 Tertiary history of the Grand Canyon, 1
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 20: (search)
to Sir Walter in 1824, asking him to sit for his likeness, but leaving the choice of the artist to him. In reply to this request, Sir Walter, with a tact and amiability very characteristic of him, selected the young American painter, then making himself known in England, and invited him to Abbotsford. Mr. Leslie has recorded the experiences of his delightful visit to the Wizard of the North, in his Autobiographical Recollections. Autobiographical Recollections of C. R. Leslie. Edited by Tom Taylor, 1860. He says, In the autumn of 1824 I visited Scotland for the purpose of painting a portrait of Sir Walter Scott, for Mr. Ticknor of Boston; and,—quoting one of his own letters written at the time,—Imagine how delightful these sittings are to me. Again, There was more benevolence expressed in Scott's face than is given in any portrait of him; and I am sure there was much in his heart. This benevolence Leslie has made very obvious in his painting, while the intellect and the humor belo
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.20 (search)
as ambassador to King John of Abyssinia, and who, after commanding the Queen's yacht, died lamented as Admiral Hewitt. Besides these there were many genial and gallant merchant captains, among them Halpin, who afterwards commanded the Great Eastern while laying ocean cables, and famous war correspondents, Hon. Francis C. Lawley, M. P., correspondent of the London Times and Frank Vizitelli of the London Illustrated News, afterwards murdered in the Soudan. Nor must the handsome and plucky Tom Taylor be forgotten, purser of the Banshee and the Night Hawk, who, by his coolness and daring, escaped with a boat's crew from the hands of the Federals after capture off the fort, and was endeared to the children as the Santa Claus of the war. At first the little Confederate was satisfied with pork and potatoes, corn-bread and rye coffee, with sorgham sweetening, but after the blockade runners made her acquaintance, the impoverished storeroom was soon filled to overflowing, notwithstanding h
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Remarkable record of the Haskells of South Carolina. (search)
y Benjamin. The latter rushed recklessly into the hottest of the charge, far in advance of the line. The father called to Wade: Bring the boy back! The elder brother spurred to the front, saw the other reel in the saddle and caught him as he fell, mortally wounded. At the moment a bullet tore through his shoulder and the father rode up to find one son dead and his bleeding brother supporting him. The general took the body tenderly in his arms, kissed the white face, and handed it to Tom Taylor. Care for Wade's wound, he called. Forward, men! All through that long and bitter day the soldier fought with lead whirring by his ears and lead in his heart. It was not until the doubtful fight was ended that he knew that the other son still lived. Brutus of old was no more true than Hampton. The women of the Prestons, the Chestnuts, and many another Carolina family proved the truth of good old blood. One gentle old Carolina lady, calm and tender of heart, was as heroic as Ham
c lands. Mr. Stevens, of Pa., moved the bill be tabled. The Speaker appointed the following to constitute the committee of one from each State on the secession portion of the Message: Corwin, of Ohio; Millson, of Va.; , of Mass.; Winslow, of N. C.; Humphrey, of N. Y.; Boyce, of S. C.; Campbell, of Pa.; Love, of Ga.; Terry, of Ct.; Davis, of Md.; Robinson, of R. I.; Whitley, of Del.; Tappan, of N. H.; Stration, of N. J.; Bristow, of Ky.; Morrill, of Vt.; Nelson, of Tenn.; Dunn, of ; Taylor, of La.; Davis, of Miss.; Kellogg, of Ill.; Houston, of Ala.; Morse, of Me.; Mich.; Hawkins, of Fla.; Hamilton, of Tex.; Washburne, of Wis.; Curtis, of Iowa; Burch, of Cal.; Windom, of Min., and Stout, of Oregon. Mr. Hawkins, of Fla. asked to be excused from serving on the committee. He had been informed that if he refused without being formally excused, he would be reprimanded by the House, but his main reason for making the request was that he did not believe in the appointment of co
Obituary of a Reporter. --Thomas William Bowlby, the correspondent of the London Times, who was killed by the Chinese near Pekin, was born in Gibraltar, but educated in England, at a county academy. Tom Taylor, the dramatist, was his chum at school.--Bowlby studied law for some time, but in 1848 was engaged by the London Times as special correspondent, and sent to various parts of the Continent, particularly Hungary. Subsequently he was connected with Jullien in his musical enterprises. He was about a year ago re-engaged by the Times, to proceed to China as special correspondent. The terms of his agreement were £1,500 ($7,500) a year, with liberty to draw upon the concern to any amount that might be required for the efficient discharge of his duties. Mr. Bowlby proceeded to China in the same steamer as Lord Elgin and Baron Gros, with whom he was shipwrecked. Mr. Bowlby was about forty-three years old, and has left a widow and five children, most of whom are of tender years.
Tom Taylor's income. --The story that Tom Taylor had become a dramatic critic of the London Times is contradicted authoritatively. Tom has his hands full writing for the stage. He gets up three letters a week for the Manchester Guardian that bring him his "guinea-a-day." His income is stated to be over $40,000. Tom Taylor's income. --The story that Tom Taylor had become a dramatic critic of the London Times is contradicted authoritatively. Tom has his hands full writing for the stage. He gets up three letters a week for the Manchester Guardian that bring him his "guinea-a-day." His income is stated to be over $40,000.
which will probably result in the death of a highly respected citizen. John O Taylor, Esq. It appears that Mr. Taylor had purchased a farm from Joseph Barnard, who Mr. Taylor had purchased a farm from Joseph Barnard, who had separated from his wife, but continued to live on the place, and on Friday the former went there with workmen to put up a fence. Barnard claimed some plank which they were about to use, as his own, and some words ensued. when Mr. Taylor took hold of him and expressed a wish that no difficulty might occur between them Barnardt into the house and got a pistol, and approaching within about three feet of Mr. Taylor, flied. --The ball entered beneath Mr. T's shoulder and glanced downwards intter the occurrence. Drs. Sinton, Berle and Terrell were called to the aid of Mr. Taylor, whose situation was found to be exceedingly dangerous. A consultation of phinquiry we have ascertained that the above narration is probably correct Mr. Taylor was for many years one of the magistrates of the county, and is well known as
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