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P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More), Book 9, line 324 (search)
branches kept the warmth of her lost body, so transformed.” And all the while that Iole told this, tearful in sorrow for her sister's fate, Alcmena weeping, tried to comfort her. But as they wept together, suddenly a wonderful event astonished them; for, standing in the doorway, they beheld the old man Iolaus, known to them, but now transformed from age to youth, he seemed almost a boy, with light down on his cheeks: for Juno's daughter Hebe, had renewed his years to please her husband, Hercules. Just at the time when ready to make oath, she would not grant such gifts to other men— Themis had happily prevented her. “For even now,” she said, “a civil strife is almost ready to break forth in Thebes, and Capaneus shall be invincible to all save the strong hand of Jove himself; and there two hostile brothers shall engage in bloody conflict; and Amphiaraus shall see his own ghost, deep in yawning earth. “His own son, dutiful to him, shall be both just and unjust in a single deed; f
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More), Book 11, line 708 (search)
hin he struck his breast again and again. At last he roused himself from gloom and slumber; and, while raised upon his elbow, he enquired of Iris why she came to him.—He knew her by her name. She answered him, “O, Sleep, divine repose of all things! Gentlest of the deities! Peace to the troubled mind, from which you drive the cares of life, restorer of men's strength when wearied with the toils of day, command a vision that shall seem the actual form of royal Ceyx to visit Trachin famed for Hercules and tell Halcyone his death by shipwreck. It is Juno's wish.” Iris departed after this was said. For she no longer could endure the effect of slumber-vapor; and as soon as she knew sleep was creeping over her tired limbs she flew from there—and she departed by the rainbow, over which she came before. Out of the multitude—his thousand sons— the god of sleep raised Morpheus by his power. Most skillful of his sons, who had the art of imitating any human shape; and dexterously could imitat
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More), Book 12, line 536 (search)
Nestor had hardly told this marvellous tale of bitter strife betwixt the Lapithae and those half-human, vanquished Centaurs, when Tlepolemus, incensed because no word of praise was given to Hercules, replied in this way; “Old sir, it is very strange, you have neglected to say one good word in praise of Hercules. My father told me often, that he overcame in battle those cloud born centaurs.” Nestor, very loth, replied, “Why force me to recall old wrongs, to uncover sorrow buried by the years,Hercules. My father told me often, that he overcame in battle those cloud born centaurs.” Nestor, very loth, replied, “Why force me to recall old wrongs, to uncover sorrow buried by the years, that made me hate your father? It is true his deeds were wonderful beyond belief, heaven knows, and filled the earth with well earned praise which I should rather wish might be denied. Deiphobus, the wise Polydamas, and even great Hector get no praise from me. Your father, I recall once overthrew Messene's walls and with no cause destroyed Elis and Pylos and with fire and sword ruined my own loved home. I cannot name all whom he killed. But there were twelve of us, the sons of Neleus and all
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More), Book 15, line 1 (search)
given—: all cast into the cruel urn were black! Soon as that urn inverted poured forth all the pebbles to be counted, every one was changed completely from its black to white, and so the vote adjudged him innocent. By that most fortunate aid of Hercules he was exempted from the country's law. “Myscelus, breathing thanks to Hercules, with favoring wind sailed on the Ionian sea, past Sallentine Neretum, Sybaris, Spartan Tarentum, and the Sirine Bay, Crimisa, and on beyond the Iapygian fields. TheHercules, with favoring wind sailed on the Ionian sea, past Sallentine Neretum, Sybaris, Spartan Tarentum, and the Sirine Bay, Crimisa, and on beyond the Iapygian fields. Then, skirting shores which face these lands, he found the place foretold the river Aesar's mouth, and found not far away a burial mound which covered with its soil the hallowed bones of Croton.—There, upon the appointed land, he built up walls—and he conferred the name of Croton, who was there entombed, on his new city, which has ever since been called Crotona.” By tradition it is known such strange deeds caused that city to be built, by men of Greece upon the Italia
P. Ovidius Naso, Art of Love, Remedy of Love, Art of Beauty, Court of Love, History of Love, Amours (ed. various), Elegy VI: To a River, as he was going to his mistress. By Rhymer. (search)
r, let me find thy courtesy, Keep within bounds, and mayst thou ne'er be dry. Thou canst not think it such a mighty boast, A torrent has a gentle lover cross'd. Rivers should rather take the lover's side, Rivers themselves love's wondrous power have tried. 'Twas on this score Inachus, pale and wan, Sickly and green, into the ocean ran ; Long before Troy the ten-years siege did fear, Thou, Xanthus, thou Neaera's chains didst wear; Ask Achelous who his horns did drub, Straight he complains of Hercules's club. For Calydon, for all Aetolia Was then contested such outrageous fray! It neither was for gold, nor yet for fee; Dejanira, it was all for thee. E'en Nile so rich, that rolls thro' sev'n wide doors, And uppish over all his country scours, For Asop's daughter did such flame contract, As not by all that stock of water slack'd. I might a hundred goodly rivers name, But must not pass by thee, immortal Thame; Ere thou couldst Isis to thy bosom take. How didst thou wind and wander for her s
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Arthur Golding), Book 9, line 1 (search)
frame Shee was in myne opinion. And the hope to win her love Did mickle envy and debate among hir wooers move. With whome I entring to the house of him that should have bee My fathrilaw: Parthaons sonne (I sayd) accept thou mee Thy Sonnylaw. And Hercules in selfsame sort did woo. And all the other suters streight gave place unto us two. He vaunted of his father Jove, and of his famous deedes, And how ageinst his stepdames spyght his prowesse still proceedes. And I ageine a toother syde sayd thking as their pryse to have the fayrest Cow in all The feeld to bee their make, and all the herd bothe greate and small Stand gazing on them fearfully not knowing unto which The conquest of so greate a gayne shall fall. Three tymes a twich Gave Hercules and could not wrinch my leaning brest him fro But at the fourth he shooke mee off and made mee to let go My hold: and with a push (I will tell truthe) he had a knacke To turne me off, and heavily he hung upon my backe. And if I may beleeved be
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Arthur Golding), Book 9, line 98 (search)
nnell was, That scarce a man could any where fynd place of passage. As Not caring for himself but for his wyfe he there did stand, This Nessus came unto him (who was strong of body and Knew well the foordes), and sayd: Use thou thy strength, O Hercules, In swimming. I will fynd the meanes this Ladie shall with ease Bee set uppon the further bank. So Hercules betooke His wyfe to Nessus. Shee for feare of him and of the brooke Lookte pale. Her husband as he had his quiver by his syde Of arrowes Hercules betooke His wyfe to Nessus. Shee for feare of him and of the brooke Lookte pale. Her husband as he had his quiver by his syde Of arrowes full, and on his backe his heavy Lyons hyde, (For to the further bank he erst his club and bow had cast) Said: Sith I have begonne, this brooke bothe must and shalbee past. He never casteth further doubts, nor seekes the calmest place, But through the roughest of the streame he cuts his way apace. Now as he on the furthersyde was taking up his bow, His heard his wedlocke shreeking out, and did hir calling know: And cryde to Nesse (who went about to deale unfaythfully In running with his char
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Arthur Golding), Book 15, line 1 (search)
went With peynfull travell, to the towne where Hercules did hoste. And asking who it was of Greece that in th'Italian coast Had buylt that towne, an aged man well seene in storyes old, To satisfye his mynd therin the processe thus him told: As Hercules enriched with the Spannish kyne did hold His voyage from the Ocean sea, men say with lucky cut He came aland on Lacine coast. And whyle he there did put His beace to grazing, he himself in Crotons house did rest, The greatest man in all thosrcifull all blacke into the pot. But when the stones were powred out to number, there was not A blacke among them. All were whyght. And so through Hercles powre A gentle judgement did proceede, and he was quit that howre. Then gave he thankes to Hercules, and having prosprous blast, Cut over the Ionian sea, and so by Tarent past Which Spartanes buylt, and Cybaris, and Neaeth Salentine, And Thurine bay, and Emese, and eeke the pastures fyne Of Calabrye. And having scarce well sought the coastes
T. Maccius Plautus, Rudens, or The Fisherman's Rope (ed. Henry Thomas Riley), act 1, scene 2 (search)
l manner. DÆM. looking out at the side. O ye immortal Gods, Sceparnio, what means those people near the sea-shore? SCEPARNIO According to my notion, they've been invited to a parting breakfastTo a parting breakfast: "Prandium propter viam." Thornton has the following Note here: "This is a sorry joke, even for Sceparnio, on so serious and melancholy an occasion, and cannot be well expressed in our tongue. When the ancients were about to undertake any voyage, they used to make a sacrifice to Hercules before they set off, which was for that reason called 'propter viam;' and the custom was to burn all they didn't eat. Wherefore Sceparnio says 'laverunt,' which signifies 'they have consumed their all' as well as they have bathed.' alluding to the ship being lost.". DÆM. How so? SCEPARNIO Why, because, after dinner, I fancy, they yesterday washed themselves clean; their ship has gone to pieces out at sea. DÆM. looking steadfastly. Such is the fact. SCEPARNIO But, i' faith, on dry land our
T. Maccius Plautus, Rudens, or The Fisherman's Rope (ed. Henry Thomas Riley), act 2, scene 4 (search)
resembling the colour of an eagle. By mistake, he happens to mention "a vulture," and immediately corrects himself, as, from its sordid habits, he may be deemed to be paying her an ill compliment.,--rather, the eagle's, indeed, I meant to say. Her breasts, too, how beautiful; and then what expression on her lips! Takes hold of her. AMPELISCA struggling. I'm no common commodity for the whole townshipNo common commodity for the whole township: "Pollucta pago." The portion of the sacrifice to Hercules which was given to the common people was said to be "pollucta," whence the present adaptation of the epithet. Echard seems to have contemplated translating this, "I'm no pie for every one's cutting up!"; can't you keep your hands off me? SCEPARNIO patting her. Won't you let me touch you, gentle one, in this manner, gently and lovingly? * * * * * * * * AMPELISCA When I have leisure, then I'll be giving my attention to toying and dalliance to please you; for the present, prithee, do either sa
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