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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 51 15 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 45 7 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 43 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 41 1 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 38 4 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 32 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 30 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: November 11, 1861., [Electronic resource] 29 1 Browse Search
James Russell Soley, Professor U. S. Navy, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, The blockade and the cruisers (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 28 0 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 27 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for Port Royal (South Carolina, United States) or search for Port Royal (South Carolina, United States) in all documents.

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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 49: first attack on Fort Fisher.--destruction of the confederate ram Albemarle, etc. (search)
possible on the works on Federal Point in conjunction with the army, and at the same time such force as can run the batteries to do so, and thus isolate the rebels. You are selected to command the naval force, and you will endeavor to be at Port Royal by the latter part of September, where further orders will await you. Bring with you to the rendezvous at Port Royal all such vessels and officers as can be spared from the West Blockading Squadron without impeding its efficiency; and when you Port Royal all such vessels and officers as can be spared from the West Blockading Squadron without impeding its efficiency; and when you leave, turn over the command of the squadron to the officer next in rank to yourself until the pleasure of the Department is known. Owing to failing health, Admiral Farragut declined accepting this command, and on the 22d of September the Secretary of the Navy wrote to Rear-Admiral Porter as follows: Sir--Rear-Admiral D. G. Farragut was assigned to the command of the North Atlantic squadron on the 5th instant; but the necessity of rest on the part of that distinguished officer renders
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 51: effects of the fall of Fort Fisher, and criticisms on General Badeau's military history of General Grant. (search)
that, owing to shoal water at the mouth of Cape Fear River, a purely naval attack cannot be undertaken against Wilmington. Had there been water enough for our broadside ships of the Hartford class, the naval attacks of New Orleans, Mobile and Port Royal would have been repeated there. I have, as you are aware, often pressed upon the War Department the importance of capturing Wilmington, and urged upon the military authorities the necessity of undertaking a joint operation against the defencesto the fall of Fort Fisher, the Navy played a more active part than was perhaps ever before taken by naval forces, and though illy supplied with the proper kind of vessels, they seldom experienced reverses. There were the fights of Hatteras, Port Royal, New Orleans, Mobile, Vicksburg, and all along the Mississippi and its tributaries, Red River, Arkansas. White, Tennessee, Cumberland and Ohio Rivers, Grand Gulf, Port Hudson, Charleston, Galveston, and the whole coast of Texas brought under c
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 56: commerce-destroyers.-their inception, remarkable career, and ending. (search)
, when the watch was called, the officer of the deck was saluted with all manner of skrim-shander. The boatswain was knocked down and hurt by a blow from a belaying-pin, and everything loose was fired aft. The officers and marines with the sober portion of the crew now charged forward, and a terrible melee ensued. Gill knocked a gunner's-mate's jaw out of place, and was laid out by a capstan-bar, and finally the drunken men were secured. * * * * * We now sailed for Jamaica, going into Port Royal, and had a pleasant time. Here something occurred that few knew of. An Irishman called King-post, from his build, being short and thick, was suspected of giving the officers information of the plans of Forest and his mates. He was closely watched and he knew it, but was on his guard. He took his liberty with the others, and, of course, got drunk. Seeing Gill and another man leading a third and going towards the suburbs, I followed, and made out the third man to be King-post. I missed
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 59: (search)
t of the General Sterling Price. 199 13 83 64 115 49 Springfield   General Sterling Price.   Cotton, 13 bales 2,694 24 334 79 2,359 45 Key West Mar. 29, 1864 Port Royal. Schooner Charm 9,756 25 1,017 54 8,738 71 do Mar. 29, 1864 Sagamore, Gem of the Sea.   Corn, 250 bushels 62 00 6 49 1 51 do Mar. 29, 1864 Fort Henry.   Cotton, 50 bales 7,254 19 841 50 6,412 69 New York May, 1864 Vanderbilt.   Cotton, 12 bales and 14 bags $2,834 69 $524 19 $2,310 50 Key West Dec. 21, 1864 Port Royal.   Cotton, 11 bales Waiting for prize list of the Somerset. 3,023 34 287 21 2,736 13 do   Somerset.   Cotton, 1 bale Waiting for prize list of the Lner Florence Nightingale 37,362 61 2,904 04 34,458 57 do June 22, 1864 Tioga, Octorara. Sloop Fashion. 12,348 87 1,175 91 11,172 96 New Orleans June 29, 1864 Port Royal. Schooner Friendship 3,209 94 850 37 2,359 57 do April 12, 1864 Tennessee. Schooner Fanny 10,317 61 1,125 66 9,191 95 do July 28, 1864 Owasco. Schoone
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