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The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 9: Poetry and Eloquence. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: May 14, 1863., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: August 8, 1861., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: may 20, 1861., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: November 4, 1861., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: may 17, 1861., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for Mount Vernon (Virginia, United States) or search for Mount Vernon (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 51 results in 30 document sections:

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Genest, or Genet, Edmond Charles 1765-1834 (search)
ertinacity, Genest denied this doctrine as contrary to right, justice, and the laws of nations, and threatened to .appeal from the President to the people ; and in this the Republican newspapers sustained him. Secret Democratic societies which had been formed became more bold and active, and Genest, mistaking the popular clamor for the deliberate voice of the nation, actually undertook to fit out a privateer at Philadelphia, in defiance of the government, during the President's absence at Mount Vernon. It was a vessel captured by L'Embuscade, and Genest named her The Little Democrat. Governor Mifflin, like Jefferson, had become sick of the Citizen, and he interfered. Genest would not heed his threats nor the persuasion of Jefferson. He denounced the President as unfaithful to the wishes of the people, and resolved to force him to call Congress together. Washington, on his return to Philadelphia, and informed of the insolence of Genest, exclaimed, Is the minister of the French re
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Geronimo, Apache Indian chief (search)
Geronimo, Apache Indian chief ; became a war-chief when sixteen years old, and for almost fifty years led a band of bloodthirsty savages; was a constant terror to the settlers in the Southwest, where he perpetrated many frightful atrocities. He was captured near Prescott, Ariz., in 1886, by Generals Miles and Lawton, after a continued chase of four years, at the expense of hundreds of lives. He was first Geronimo. imprisoned at Mount Vernon, Ala., but later at Fort Sill, Oklahoma.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Hamilton, Alexander 1757- (search)
enied, under oath, that Jefferson had anything to do with his paper, and declared he had never written a line for it. To this An American replied that actions were louder than words or oaths, and charged Jefferson with being the prompter of the attacks on government measures and the aspersions on honorable men. The papers by An American were at once ascribed to Hamilton, and drew out answers from Jefferson's friends. To these Hamilton replied. The quarrel waxed hot. Washington (then at Mount Vernon), as soon as he heard of the newspaper war, tried to bring about a truce between the angry Secretaries. In a letter to Jefferson, Aug. 23, 1792, he said: How unfortunate and how much to be regretted it is that, while we are encompassed on all sides with avowed enemies and insidious friends, internal dissensions should be harrowing and tearing out our vitals. He portrayed the public injury that such a quarrel would inflict. He wrote to Hamilton to the same effect. Their answers were ch
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Houdon, Jean Antoine 1740-1828 (search)
Houdon, Jean Antoine 1740-1828 Sculptor; born in Versailles, France, March 20. 1740; passed ten years at Rome in the study of the antiques. In 1785 he was employed to make a marble statue of Washington for the State of Virginia, which now stands in the rotunda of the State capitol at Richmond. He visited Mount Vernon and made a cast of the living face only, and. after returning to France, modelled the entire full length of the patriot. That original cast is at Mount Vernon It is the true model of Washington's face, and should be the standard portrait. He died in Paris, July 15, 1828. Houdon's mask of Washington.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Humphreys, David 1752-1818 (search)
1780 was made aide to Washington. Having distinguished himself at Yorktown, he was made the bearer of the captured British standards to Congress, when that body voted him an elegant sword. At the close of the war he accompanied Washington to Mount Vernon, and in July, 1784, went to France as secretary of legation to Jefferson, accompanied by Kosciuszko. In 1787 he was appointed colonel of a regiment for the Western service, but when it was reduced, in 1788, he again went to Mount Vernon, wherMount Vernon, where he remained with Washington until sent as minister to Portugal in 1790. He was master of ceremonies in regulating the etiquette of the republican court of the first President. Appointed minister to Spain in 1797, he continued there until 1802, and concluded treaties with Algiers and Tripoli. He was extensively engaged in agriculture and manufactures after his return to America, and in 1812 he took command of the militia of Connecticut. He was a poet of considerable genius; also a dramati
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Kendall, George Wilkins 1809-1867 (search)
Kendall, George Wilkins 1809-1867 Journalist; born in Amherst (now Mount Vernon), N. H., Aug. 22, 1809; removed to New Orleans in 1835, and with Francis A. Lumsden, founded the Picayune, the first cheap daily newspaper in that city. Later this paper became the best known in the South. His publications include Narrative of the Texan Santa Fe expedition; and The War between the United States and Mexico. He died in Oak Spring, Tex., Oct. 22, 1867.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Lafayette, Marie Jean Paul Roch Yves Gilbert Motier, Marquis de 1757- (search)
scenes of the old war for independence. When at the seat of government in October, 1824, while on his visit to the United States, the marquis was conducted to Mount Vernon by George Washington Parke Custis, the adopted son of Washington, with whom George W. Lafayette had lived in the mansion of the great patriot while Lafayette wand in a prison. He was conveyed from the capital in a barge, accompanied by his son; John C. Calhoun, Secretary of War, and Mr. Custis; and at the shore at Mount Vernon he was received by Lawrence Lewis, Washington's favorite nephew, and the family of Judge Bushrod Washington, who was then absent on official business. After vvisit to the United States. On Aug. 4, of that year, he landed at New York, and, in the space of five months from that time, visited his venerable friend at Mount Vernon, where he was then living in retirement, and traversed ten States of the Union, receiving everywhere, from their legislative assemblies, from the municipal bod
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Mount Vernon Ladies' Association. (search)
Mount Vernon Ladies' Association. The Washington estate at Mount Vernon, Virginia, is under the care and direction of the Mount Vernon Ladies' Association of the Union. The founder of the association, in 1854, was Miss Ann Pamela Cunningham, of South Carolina. She was the first regent, and was succeeded in 1873 by Mrs. Macalester Laughton, and in 1891 by Mrs. Justine Van Rensselaer Townsend, of New York (a great-granddaughter of Gen. Philip Schuyler, and great-greatgranddaughter of Philip Livingston, the signer of the Declaration of Independence). There are vice-regents for the separate States.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Mount Vernon threatened. (search)
Mount Vernon threatened. In July, 1776, when Governor Dunmore was driven from Gwyn's Island, he ascended the Potomac as far as Occoquan and burned the mills there. The Virginia militia repulsed him. It is supposed his chief destination was Mount Vernon, a few miles above, which he intended to lay waste, and seize Mrs. WashiMount Vernon, a few miles above, which he intended to lay waste, and seize Mrs. Washington as a hostage. The British frigates, after they entered Chesapeake Bay, in the spring of 1781, ascended the Potomac and levied contributions upon all the tide-water counties. They menaced Mount Vernon, and, to save the buildings, Washington's manager consented to furnish a supply of provisions. In a letter to his manager WMount Vernon, and, to save the buildings, Washington's manager consented to furnish a supply of provisions. In a letter to his manager Washington reproved him for the act. It would have been a less painful circumstance to me to have heard that, in consequence of your non-compliance with their request, they had burned my house and laid the plantation in ruins. You ought to have considered yourself as my representative, and should have reflected on the bad example
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Orleans, Duke of -1850 (search)
Orleans, Duke of -1850 Son of Philippe Egalite, was in the French Revolutionary army, but becoming involved with Dumouriez in 1793; fled from France to Switzerland; and in 1796 came to America, where he travelled extensively, visiting Washington at Mount Vernon in 1797. He was elected King of the French in 1830, and reigned until his abdication in 1848. He died in Claremont, England, Aug. 26, 1850.
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