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General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 12 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 0 Browse Search
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac 8 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 6 0 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 6 0 Browse Search
John D. Billings, The history of the Tenth Massachusetts battery of light artillery in the war of the rebellion 4 0 Browse Search
General Horace Porter, Campaigning with Grant 4 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 4 0 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 4 0 Browse Search
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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The surrender at Appomattox Court House. (search)
s rear-guard. After issuing some further instructions to Ord and Sheridan, he started from Farmville, crossed to the north side of the Appomattox, conferred in person with Meade, and rode with his columns. Encouraging reports came in all day, and that night Headquarters were established at Curdsville in a large white farm-house, a few hundred yards from Meade's camp. The general and several of the staff had cut loose from the headquarters trains the night he started to meet Sheridan at Jetersville, and had neither baggage nor camp-equipage. The general did not even have his sword with him. This was the most advanced effort yet made at moving in light marching order, and we billeted ourselves at night in farm-houses, or bivouacked on porches, and picked up meals at any camp that seemed to have something to spare in the way of rations. This night we sampled the fare of Meade's hospitable mess and once more lay down with full stomachs. General Grant had been suffering all the aft
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 21: closing events of the War.--assassination of the President. (search)
and on the afternoon of the 4th April, 1865. he struck the Danville road at Jetersville, seven miles southwest of Amelia Court-House, when some of his cavalry swepnchburg and the mountains beyond, by taking a westerly course at the left of Jetersville, and recrossing the Appomattox at Farmville, thirty-five miles from Amelia CSheridan was out of the question, for General Meade had joined the latter at Jetersville, with the Second and Sixth Corps of the Army of the Potomac, late that afterward evening, with his cavalry, on a reconnoissance to the left and front of Jetersville. He found a part of Lee's army moving westward from Amelia Court-House, hisand Smith, he extricated himself after some heavy fighting, and fell back to Jetersville. On the morning of the 6th April. nearly the whole of the Army of the Potomac was at Jetersville, and was moved upon Amelia Court-House to attack Lee. Sheridan had returned the Fifth Corps to Meade, and now operated with the cavalry alon
stward by Amelia C. H. Sheridan heads hun off from Danville, at Jetersville Davies strikes his train at Sabine's Cross-roads Lee hasteningxtension of lines to the Appomattox, April 2. 5. Positions at Jetersville, April 5. 6. Positions at battle of Sailor's creek, April 6. rably south of Amelia C. H., had struck the Danville railroad at Jetersville, while his advance had swept down that road nearly to Burkesvillril 3. and ultimately driven by the 5th corps. Concentrating at Jetersville, Sheridan had here planted him-self across the railroad, intrenc 5th; moving around the left of Meade and Sheridan's position at Jetersville, striking for Farmville, in order to recross there the Appomattopirited fight ensued; but Davies was extricated; falling back on Jetersville; where nearly our whole army was next morning April 6. concenr 6,000 were taken this day. Ere this, Ord, reaching out from Jetersville farther west, had struck the head of Lee's marching column near
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), Maps [drawn by Colonel Lyman] (search)
Maps [drawn by Colonel Lyman] The Rapidan51 From the Rapidan to Spotsylvania Court House86 The Attack on the Salient113 From Tolopotamoy Creek to Chickahominy River117 The North and South Annas and Pamunkey River120 Richmond-Petersburg155 Between Petersburg and Richmond215 Jerusalem Plank Road and Weldon Railroad218 Boydton Plank Road and Hatcher's Run328 High Bridge to Appomattox Court House336 Namozine Road to Jetersville342 Appomattox Court House344 Boydton Plank Road347 George Gordon Meade
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), chapter 9 (search)
l marked the spot. Grant had camped Namozine road to Jetersville there, too, and had confirmed the rumor that Richmond wLast night, at 9.30, came a note from Sheridan, dated at Jetersville, saying that he was there, entrenched, with the 5th Corp orders for them to move at one at night and push on for Jetersville, followed by the 6th Corps, which lay just behind. The nd then, striking off to the right, across the fields to Jetersville. At ten, we got word that the enemy were still near AmeSheridan at the house, which was perhaps a mile south of Jetersville. Along the front was the 5th Corps, strongly entrenchedthe 2d Corps were turned into the left-hand road nearest Jetersville, and directed to push on and strike the enemy wherever t nine we got to the left-hand road lying some way beyond Jetersville, and here the 5th Corps was turned in, with orders to foe road, somewhere below us. . . . At ten, we got back to Jetersville, a collection of half-a-dozen houses with a country chur
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), Index (search)
329, 345, 346, 352; 353, 356; described, 6, 73, 78, 108, 307; on horses, 8; rejoins army, 64; mystery, 76; before Petersburg, 163, 217, 234, 237; on war, 243; new command, 279, 285, 326; at races, 321. Hunt, Henry Jackson, 63, 197, 275, 277; on Grant, 313. Hutchins, Benjamin Tucker, 16. Huts for winter quarters, 60. ice, 135. Indian, picket, 242. Ingalls, Rufus, 34, 60, 163, 279. Irish, good qualities, 131, 208. James river, 158. Jericho Bridge, 122. Jeter, —, 129. Jetersville, 342, 345, 349. John, history of, 274. Johnson, Edward, 111. Johnson, —, 183. Johnston, Joseph, 102n. Joinville, Prince de, 95. Kearny, Philip, 139. Kellogg, —, 61. Kelly's Ford, 43. Kelly's house, 140, 143. Kennedy, Joseph Camp Griffith, 73. Kent, —, 179. Kilpatrick, Judson, 15, 68, 76; raid, 77, 79. Kirkpatrick, —, 274. Landron house, 114. Lazelle, Henry Martyn, 286. Leave of absence, 59. Ledlie, James Hewitt, 167, 199, 310. Lee, Robert Edward, 163, 184;
orning of Sunday, the 9th, the attempt was made. Gordon was fighting his corps, as he said, to a frazzle, when Lee came at last to a realizing sense of the futility of it all and Pursuit of Lee to Appomattox. The roads leading west from Petersburg crossed and recrossed the Appomattox and its tributaries. The spring floods impeded, though they did not actually check, Grant's impetuous pursuit of Lee. By the time Lee had reached Amelia Court House (April 5th), Grant's van was at Jetersville. Lee halted to bring up provisions; as he said in his official report, the ensuing delay proved fatal to his plans. The provisions that he expected to find at Amelia Court House were captured by the Federals. The freshet that delayed Grant's pursuit The flooded Appomattox ordered a truce. A meeting with Grant was soon arranged on the basis of the letters already exchanged. The conference of the two world-famous commanders took place at Appomattox, a small settlement with only
orning of Sunday, the 9th, the attempt was made. Gordon was fighting his corps, as he said, to a frazzle, when Lee came at last to a realizing sense of the futility of it all and Pursuit of Lee to Appomattox. The roads leading west from Petersburg crossed and recrossed the Appomattox and its tributaries. The spring floods impeded, though they did not actually check, Grant's impetuous pursuit of Lee. By the time Lee had reached Amelia Court House (April 5th), Grant's van was at Jetersville. Lee halted to bring up provisions; as he said in his official report, the ensuing delay proved fatal to his plans. The provisions that he expected to find at Amelia Court House were captured by the Federals. The freshet that delayed Grant's pursuit The flooded Appomattox ordered a truce. A meeting with Grant was soon arranged on the basis of the letters already exchanged. The conference of the two world-famous commanders took place at Appomattox, a small settlement with only
the absence of practicable fords delayed the crossing of that stream. The outlook at that point on the line of march was evidently disturbing to General Lee, for on arrival of the engineer troops late in the afternoon, for which he had waited, he impressed upon the colonel in command of them the necessity for strenuous efforts to effect as rapid a crossing of Flat Creek as possible, emphasizing his instruction by saying that a captured order from General Grant to General Ord, who was at Jetersville, indicated an attack early next morning. Timber was felled; a new bridge was built; the last vehicle had passed over it, and the engineer troops were already in motion toward Amelia Springs, when a Federal battery unlimbered on a near-by hill and fired a few shells to expedite the movement of as tired and hungry a body of Confederate troops as could have been found that morning in General Lee's army, where fatigue and hunger were familiar conditions. When the engineer troops, which
iles of dubious country. It was nip and tuck whether Yank or Reb first laid hands on him, and when he finally reached the wearied leader, and, rousing to the occasion, Grant decided to ride at once through the darkness to Sheridan's side, and set forth with only a little escort and the scout as guide, two staff-officers, thoroughly suspicious, strapped the latter to his saddle, linked his horse with theirs, and cocked their revolvers at his back. That scout rode those long miles back to Jetersville with these words occasionally murmured into his ears, At the first sight or sound of treachery, you die. Not until they reached Sheridan at midnight were they sure it was not a device of the desperate foe. Volumes could be written of the Secret Service of the Union armies—what it cost and what it was really worth-but the South, it is believed, could more than match every exploit. Serious as was this problem, there were others beyond that of the strategy of a campaign of even greater m
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