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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 34 0 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 34 0 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 32 0 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 31 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 26 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 24 6 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 23 3 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 22 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 20 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 20 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for Hampton Roads (Virginia, United States) or search for Hampton Roads (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 79 results in 21 document sections:

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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 33: (search)
uting with Mr. Weidman (though not a seaman) the privilege of being the last to leave the wreck. I have the honor to be, sir, respectfully, your obedient servant, S. F. Dupont, Flag-Officer, Commanding South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy, Washington. Report of Major John Geo. Reynolds, U. S. M. C. United States Ship Sabine, At Sea, November 8, 1861. Sir — I have the honor to report that the marine battalion under my command left Hampton Roads on transport steamboat Governor, on the morning of Tuesday, the 29th of October, with the other vessels of the fleet, and continued with them, near the flag-ship Wabash, until Friday, the 1st of November. On Friday morning, about 10 o'clock, the wind began to freshen, and by 12 or 1 blew so violently that we were obliged to keep her head directly to the wind, and thereby leave the squadron, which apparently stood its course. Throughout the afternoon the gale continued to increase, th
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Letters relating to the battle of Port Royal and occupation of the Confederate forts. (search)
uting with Mr. Weidman (though not a seaman) the privilege of being the last to leave the wreck. I have the honor to be, sir, respectfully, your obedient servant, S. F. Dupont, Flag-Officer, Commanding South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy, Washington. Report of Major John Geo. Reynolds, U. S. M. C. United States Ship Sabine, At Sea, November 8, 1861. Sir — I have the honor to report that the marine battalion under my command left Hampton Roads on transport steamboat Governor, on the morning of Tuesday, the 29th of October, with the other vessels of the fleet, and continued with them, near the flag-ship Wabash, until Friday, the 1st of November. On Friday morning, about 10 o'clock, the wind began to freshen, and by 12 or 1 blew so violently that we were obliged to keep her head directly to the wind, and thereby leave the squadron, which apparently stood its course. Throughout the afternoon the gale continued to increase, th
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 34: (search)
. As soon as Flag-officer Goldsborough received the news of the battle of the Monitor and Merrimac, he returned to Hampton Roads to superintend matters in that quarter, leaving Commander S. C. Rowan in charge of the sounds of North Carolina. Tve fallen into their hands, and could have been retaken at any time by a force of ten thousand men and the vessels at Hampton Roads. Flag-officer Goldsborough, supposing that Sewell's Point and Craney Island might not have surrendered, ordered al in its river communications with the North, in the earlier part of the war, but for the presence of this squadron at Hampton Roads, where it was within easy reach. Without it, the Grand Army of the Potomac could not have been moved so successfullyhanged defeat into victory. It might appear to some people that there was a larger number of vessels lying idle in Hampton Roads than was necessary, and that these might in the earlier part of the war have pushed on up the James and kept that riv
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 35: operations of the North Atlantic Squadron, 1863. (search)
and Pamlico Sounds under subjection. All the naval force of the enemy between Norfolk and Howlet batteries had either been destroyed or made its escape to Richmond, enabling the Navy Department to decrease the large force kept in and about Hampton Roads. From September 1st up to January there was but little of moment to report in the North Atlantic squadron, beyond the operations in the sounds of North Carolina and the naval expedition under Commander Foxhall A. Parker, off Yorktown, whicilt, an event that made her name as famous as that of the old Constitution, and then she sank from sight in the depth of ocean, leaving behind her not as much of her hull as would serve to make a small memento of the past. The Monitor left Hampton Roads in tow of the U. S. steamer Rhode Island, on the 29th of December, 1862, at 2.30 P. M., with a light southwest wind, and clear, pleasant weather, with a prospect of its continuance. At 5 A. M., the next morning, a swell set in from the south
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 39: Miscellaneous operations, land and sea.--operations in the Nansemond, Cape Fear, Pamunky, Chucka Tuck and James Rivers.--destruction of blockade-runners.--adventures of Lieutenant Cushing, etc. (search)
of Major-General Sigel, were at Winchester. An important part of the North Atlantic squadron, under the immediate command of Acting-Rear-Admiral Lee, was at Hampton Roads; some of the vessels were on the James, others on the York River, ready as heretofore to co-operate with the Army when the great movement on Richmond should bele these small affairs were being transacted, the Confederate naval officers were preparing to retaliate on the vessels of the North Atlantic squadron lying in Hampton Roads. Lieutenant Hunter Davidson, of the Confederate navy, had given much study to the subject of torpedoes, and had perfected what he considered an excellent torpe by a torpedo-boat arranged for the purpose by Lieutenant Davidson, who had been watching the movements of the Federals since the transports first assembled in Hampton Roads. The investigations of the naval officers soon disclosed a system of defence embracing all the navigable rivers. The torpedoes were followed up, their posi
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 44: battle of Mobile Bay. (search)
was the case, he did not take long to make up his mind. The fleet had not been anchored more than fifteen minutes when it was reported to Admiral Farragut that the Tennessee was coming out from under Fort Morgan and standing down for the head of the fleet. Farragut at once divined that it was his enemy's intention to sink the flagship (which would have been glory enough for one day), but he determined to show the Confederates that it was an easier matter to sink a frigate at anchor in Hampton Roads than a live fleet in Mobile Bay. The signal was at once made to get underway, and the crews ran the anchors up to the bows with marvellous rapidity. The iron-clads, and such wooden vessels as had been prepared with iron prows, were ordered to attack the Tennessee at once, before she could reach the centre of the fleet, and the wooden vessels were directed to ram the iron-clad and attempt to disable her in that way. Thus the fleet and the Tennessee were approaching each other rapid
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 49: first attack on Fort Fisher.--destruction of the confederate ram Albemarle, etc. (search)
, the Navy Department began to assemble at Hampton Roads a proper force of vessels for the occasioned to attack Fort Fisher were assembled at Hampton Roads, to the number of about one hundred. Many in assembling the vessels of the fleet at Hampton Roads, and they never denied Admiral Porter anytch: United States Flag-Ship Malvern, Hampton Roads November 11, 1864. Sir — I have the honander-in-chief of the large fleet lying in Hampton Roads began to be severely tried by the delay in for the service, and sent from Newbern to Hampton Roads, where the immense mass of powder requiredhrough the ordeal. The latter remained in Hampton Roads until the last transport had started and gtlantic Squadron, U. S. Flag-Ship Malvern, Hampton Roads, December 10, 1864. The chart plan of t, General Weitzel recommended a retreat to Hampton Roads! Tile officer who was to have gone in com It is expected that the troops will leave Hampton Roads next Monday or Tuesday. This is all the[11 more...]
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 50: Second attack on Fort Fisher. (search)
ied the public. One said the whole expedition had gone back to Hampton Roads, and the chances were that, in the estimation of the public, thent to Beaufort. The naval ammunition had not all arrived from Hampton Roads, and the ships bade fair to be found unprepared in case Generaluously fought to gain the stronghold would go back rejoicing to Hampton Roads, having wiped out the disgrace inflicted through no fault of thore remained to be done. A quick dispatch-vessel was sent to Hampton Roads immediately on the fall of Fort Fisher to notify the Navy Deparoperate with the army, proceeded in the steamer Rhode Island to Hampton Roads, while all the vessels not needed in Cape Fear River were dispaher points which the enemy still occupied. On his arrival at Hampton Roads, the Admiral received the following letter from Secretary Welleseemed rather discreditable to the Navy. Before the fleet left Hampton Roads, every care was taken that the James River, below Howlett's Bat
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 51: effects of the fall of Fort Fisher, and criticisms on General Badeau's military history of General Grant. (search)
d force, which I agreed to furnish. Immediately commenced the assemblage in Hampton Roads, under Admiral D. D. Porter, of one of the most formidable armada ever collrequired at once, and went myself, in company with Major-General Butler, to Hampton Roads, where we had a conference with Admiral Porter as to the force required and explosion of the powder-boat. The expedition was detained several days at Hampton Roads, awaiting the loading of the powder-boat. The importance of getting the other duty to strengthen this expedition. The vessels are concentrated at Hampton Roads and Beaufort, where they remain — an immense force lying idle, awaiting theith the other branch of the service, and, after the expedition started from Hampton Roads, neither commander visited the other! Now, here is a paragraph that oug had caused the troops to re-embark. I shall, therefore, said he, sail for Hampton Roads as soon as the transport fleet can be got in order. Now this is what Ba
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 54: capture of Richmond.--the destruction of the Confederate fleet in the James River, etc. (search)
Chapter 54: capture of Richmond.--the destruction of the Confederate fleet in the James River, etc. Assembling of the naval vessels in Hampton Roads and on the James River. operations of the armies around Richmond. President Lincoln visits City Point. the memorable council on board the River Queen. decision of the council. the terms of surrender offered to General Johnston. ability of the Confederate generals. the example of President Lincoln. the Confederate iron-clads bloche Navy, not being governed by any feelings of rancor towards the Confederate sympathizers on shore, stood ready to shield from harm many who had been the bitterest foes of the Union. Meanwhile, a large number of naval vessels assembled in Hampton Roads and on the James River, in anticipation of coming events, for all eyes now centred on Richmond, where General Lee and his army of veterans were making their final stand with little prospect of success against the overwhelming force brought to
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