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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 10.78 (search)
th. On the morning of the 13th we reached Fisher's Hill, and there remained until the 16th. The enemy was found posted on the north bank of Cedar Creek, in a very strong position and in strong force. I was now compelled to move back for want of provisions and forage, or attack the enemy in his position with the hope of driving him from it, and I determined to attack. General Gordon and Captain Jed. Hotchkiss, my topographical engineer, were sent to the signal station on the end of Massanutten Mountain, which had been reestablished, for the purpose of examining the enemy's position from that point, and General John Pegram was ordered to go as near as he could to Cedar Creek on the enemy's right flank and see whether it was practicable to surprise him on that flank. Captain Hotchkiss returned to my headquarters after dark and reported the result of his and General Gordon's examination, and he gave me a sketch of the enemy's position and camps. He informed me that the enemy's left f
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 15: the Army of the Potomac on the Virginia Peninsula. (search)
Massanutten range northward, were perfectly defined. Our driver was a competent guide, being familiar with the events and the localities in that region, and we anticipated a day of pleasure and profit, and were not disappointed. A mile south of Harrisonburg we turned to the left up a rough, lane-like road, that skirted the field upon a ridge in which Ashby was killed. The place of his death was at the edge of a wood two hundred yards north of the road. The abrupt southern end of Massanutten Mountain, on which Jackson had a signal-station while Banks lay near him, arose like a huge buttress above the general level, seven miles to our left, while before us and to the right was a beautiful hill country, bordered by distant mountain ranges. We soon came to the battle-ground of Cross Keys, sketched the Union Church (see page 396), that was in the midst of the storm of conflict, and rode on to Port Republic, twelve miles from Harrisonburg, where we passed over a substantial new bridge
ward Winchestar. He had sent his troops on that road, instead of on the one I had ordered him to send them on. He said that he had received information from his aid-de-camp that Jackson had fallen back, and he had sent his troops this way. When I got up there, they were coming in. Well, it was too late to get ahead of Jackson then. with the cavalry advance of Shields's division, reached that point. Shields, however, pushed up the South Fork of the Shenandoah, on the other side of Massanutten Mountain, expecting to head Jackson at some point farther south; while Fremont followed him directly down the North Fork, by Woodstock and Mount Jackson, to Harrisonburg. The advance of each was greatly embarrassed by the many streams which make their way down from the mountains into either branch of the Shenandoah, and which were now swollen to raging torrents by the incessant rains; Jackson of course burning or breaking down the bridges as he passed them, and sending cavalry across to destr
s battle was fully 3,000, including Gen. David A. Russell, killed, with Gens. McIntosh, Chapman, and Upton wounded. The heroic 19th corps--on which fell the brunt of the fight — alone lost 1,940 killed and wounded. Among the Rebels killed were Gens. Rhodes and A. C. Godwin. Pollard admits a loss of 3,000 on their side ; but, as we took 3,000 prisoners, will 5 guns, it was probably much greater. Early fell back to Fisher's Hill, 8 miles south of Winchester, between the North and Massanutten mountains — regarded as the very strongest position in the Valley. Sheridan followed sharply, allowing but two days to intervene between his first and his second victory. Advancing the 6th corps against the front and the 19th on the left of the Rebel stronghold, he again sent the a long circuit around on the right, striking heavily in flank and rear, while a vigorous attack in front broke the enemy's center. The victory here was even more decisive, as well as far more cheaply purchased, tha
(Shenandoah) until the concentration of Sheridan's forces compelled his retirement. Then the Valley finally became eliminated as an avenue of danger to Washington. wooded base of Fisher's Hill, four miles away. The Sixth Corps started for Washington, but the news of Early at Fisher's Hill led to its recall. The Union forces occupied ground that was considered practically unassailable, especially on the left, where the deep gorge of the Shenandoah, along whose front rose the bold Massanutten Mountain, gave it natural protection. The movements of the Confederate army were screened by the wooded ravines in front of Fisher's Hill, while, from the summit of the neighboring Three Top Mountain, its officers could view, as in a panorama, the entire Union camp. Seemingly secure, the corps of Crook on the left of the Union line was not well protected. The keen-eyed Gordon saw the weak point in the Union position. Ingenious plans to break it down were quickly made. Meanwhile, Sheri
(Shenandoah) until the concentration of Sheridan's forces compelled his retirement. Then the Valley finally became eliminated as an avenue of danger to Washington. wooded base of Fisher's Hill, four miles away. The Sixth Corps started for Washington, but the news of Early at Fisher's Hill led to its recall. The Union forces occupied ground that was considered practically unassailable, especially on the left, where the deep gorge of the Shenandoah, along whose front rose the bold Massanutten Mountain, gave it natural protection. The movements of the Confederate army were screened by the wooded ravines in front of Fisher's Hill, while, from the summit of the neighboring Three Top Mountain, its officers could view, as in a panorama, the entire Union camp. Seemingly secure, the corps of Crook on the left of the Union line was not well protected. The keen-eyed Gordon saw the weak point in the Union position. Ingenious plans to break it down were quickly made. Meanwhile, Sheri
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of the army of Northern Virginia. (search)
f the Confedracy by the following characteristic dispatch: Valley District, May 9, 1862. To General S. Cooper: God blessed our arms with victory at McDowell yesterday. T. J. Jackson, Major-General. After defeating Milroy — Fremont's advance guard — and pursuing him until he was driven out of the range of proposed operations in the valley, he ordered Ewell to move down the Luray valley, while he marched across by Harrisonburg down the main pike to Newmarket, and then over Massanuttin mountain to join Ewell in his advance. I shall never forget the enthusiasm with which we started on that march. The Luray Valley lies between the Blue Ridge and the Massanuttin (a high and precipitous mountain which suddenly rises from the valley opposite Swift Run Gap, and as suddenly terminates near Strausburg, fifty miles below), and is one of the loveliest spots that the sun shines upon. As we moved down this beautiful valley, by the pretty little town of Luray, past many pleasant hom
ny mountains, the general direction of these chains being south-west. The valley at Martinsburg is about sixty miles broad, at Winchester forty to forty-five, and at Strasburg twenty-five to thirty miles, where an isolated chain, called Massanutten mountain, rises up running parallel to the Blue Ridge, and terminates at Harrisonburg; here the valley again opens out fifty or sixty miles broad. This isolated chain divides the valley, for its continuance, into two valleys, the one next the Blueced through Front Royal, and down the F. R. and W. pike toward Winchester, could be thrown in my rear, or, in case of my driving the enemy to Fisher's hill, and taking position in his front, this same force could be moved along the base of Massanutten mountain on the road to Strasburg, with the same result. As my effective line of battle strength at this time was about eighteen thousand infantry, and thirty-five hundred cavalry, I remained quiet during the day — except the activity on the ski
131, 164 McCall, Gen. G. A. .... 26, 46, 56 McCartney, Capt. W. II. 44, 80, 84, 98, 110. McClellan, Gen. G. B. 22, 56, 73, 80, 89, 90 McDowell, Gen. Irvin .... 27 McLaws, Gen ....... 77 Magruder, Gen. J. B.....33, 35, 55 Malvern Hill ......... 61 Massachusetts Troops, 32, 35, 38, 109, 122, 123, 148, 181. March of the Sixth Corps ....120 Manassas ..... 28, 118, 136, 137 Manchester ........119 Marye's Hill.......108, 109 Masterly Retreat....48, 66 Massanutten Mountains ...170 Mechanicsville ...... 43, 45 Meade, Gen. George G. 94, 119, 124, 144 Military Execution .... 23, 162 Mine Run ......144, 145 Monocacy ......... 74, 160 Mud March .......101, 102 Newton, Gen. John ... 22, 109, 129 Newmarket ......182 North Anna River ...... 154 Nineteenth Corps, 162, 164, 166, 168, 171, 174, 176, 178, 179. Occoquon. .116 Opequon .. 169, 171, 174, 176 On the Peninsula. . 33, 66, 55 Pay-day .......... 31 Pamunkey River..36, 37
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The battle of Cedar Creek. (search)
led in the darkness. Above, the starry and resplendent heavens. So calm, so tranquil, so peaceful the scene that it seemed a sacrilege to break its stillness by war's rude alarms, or to mar its loveliness by strife and bloodshed. Just as day was breaking and faint streaks of light appeared in the east, the sound of musketry and the cheers of the troops down the creek disclosed the attack and the plan of battle. Our army had been moved quietly down the creek and around the end of Massanutton mountain by a very difficult route, under the cover of night, and had made a complete surprise of the enemy's camp. The line of fire moved rapidly up the creek, showing that the attack met with little resistance. The boom of cannon captured from the enemy and turned upon their fleeing owners, mingled with the sound of musketry. Soon the bridge was reached and cleared, and our artillery and ordnance wagons passed over to assist in the attack. On the extreme right of the enemy time had b
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