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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Name Index of Commands 119 19 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 111 3 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 110 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 87 5 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 77 1 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 74 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 54 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 54 0 Browse Search
Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 53 1 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 50 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4.. You can also browse the collection for Morris Island (South Carolina, United States) or search for Morris Island (South Carolina, United States) in all documents.

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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The death of Generals Cleburne and Adams. (search)
eant, when he fell, horse and all, shot by the color-guard. I was a reenlisted veteran, and went through twenty-seven general engagements, but I am sure that Franklin was the hardest-fought field that I ever stood upon. General J. D. Cox [in his Franklin and Nashville ] censures General Wagner for holding to his advanced position too long, calls his action a gross blunder, etc.; but, as one of Cox's men, I looked upon the matter in a different light. I think if Cleburne had not struck Wagner's two brigades as he did that his brave lads would have broken our line successfully; but, as it was, his men were badly winded with his work with Wagner, which gave Opdycke's and White's men a better chance to check him at the cotton-gin. The way I saw it was this: I was acting as orderly and standing a few paces east of the cotton-gin. The first Confederate troops that; came in view were Stewart's corps on our left with Cheatham's corps to the left of Stewart. The Confederate line moved
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Repelling Hood's invasion of Tennessee. (search)
true. He also ordered General Stanley to march with two divisions, Wagner's and Kimball's, to Spring Hill, taking the trains and all the resere Hood formed his line of battle. From a photograph: the right of Wagner's two brigades, in the advanced position, was posted behind the sto Spring Hill. Kimball's division followed Wood's, and at 4 o'clock Wagner drew in his lines, his skirmishers remaining till it was fairly day river, but returned when the firing began and assisted in rallying Wagner's brigades, of his corps, during which he was wounded. General Sch Corps had gone over the river with the trains; and two brigades of Wagner's division, which had so valiantly stood their ground at Spring HilThe first shock came, of course, upon the two misplaced brigades of Wagner's division, which, through some one's blunder, had remained in theiot demoralized by the momentary panic. Colonel Emerson Opdycke, of Wagner's division, as already stated, had brought his brigade inside the w
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The defense of Fort Fisher. (search)
udgment, and in that of the experienced officers of his command who had been on the skirmish-line, with any prospect of success, was impossible. This opinion coincided with my own, and mulch as I regretted the necessity of abandoning the attempt, yet the path of duty was plain. Not so strong a work as Fort Fisher had been taken by assault during the war, and I had to guide me the experience of Port Hudson, with its slaughtered thousands in the repulsed assault, and the double assault of Fort Wagner, where thousands were sacrificed in an attempt to take a work less strong than Fisher, after it had been subjected to a more continued and fully as severe fire. And in neither of the instances I have mentioned had the assaulting force in its rear, as I had, an army of the enemy larger than itself. I therefore ordered that no assault should be made, and that the troops should reembark. editors. In the works on that afternoon were Map of the naval and Military attacks on Fort Fisher,
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The failure to capture Hardee. (search)
oss the Back River to a causeway that led over the swamps to the main-land of the Carolina bank. Beauregard ordered the movement to be made that night, though accident delayed it until the night of the 20th, when by this route — the only exit from Savannah — Hardee was safely withdrawn, with field-artillery, baggage, and stores, and the bridge then destroyed. This was one of the neatest achievements of the war, rivaling in decision, resource, and skill the evacuations of Corinth and of Morris Island by the same commander. But meanwhile, cautiously leaving his 60,000 men concentrated on the Georgia bank of the river, General Sherman had gone in person around by the sea to Hilton Head in order to procure the assistance of Foster's army for the investment of Savannah from the Carolina bank. It is clear that, had Slocum's suggestion been adopted, or had even the single brigade of his corps that had crossed the river above Savannah been vigorously pushed against the thin line of Conf
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