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Pausanias, Description of Greece, Phocis and Ozolian Locri, chapter 37 (search)
e is a spring called Saunium. The length of the road from Delphi to Cirrha, the port of Delphi, is sixty stades. Descending to the plain you c either by reason of a hero or on any other account. The plain from Cirrha is altogether bare, and the inhabitants will not plant trees, eitheow that the ground is useless for growing trees. It is said that to Cirrha...and they say that from Cirrha the place received its modern name.Cirrha the place received its modern name. Homer, however, in the Iliad,Hom. Il. 2.520 and similarly in the hymn to Apollo,See HH Apoll. 269, 282, 438. calls the city by its ancient name of Crisa. Afterwards the people of Cirrha behaved wickedly towards Apollo; especially in appropriating some of the god's land. So the Amphisea.So Solon induced them to consecrate to the god the territory of Cirrha, in order that the sea might become neighbor to the precinct of Apoey exacted punishment from the Cirrhaeans on behalf of the god, and Cirrha is the port of Delphi. Its notable sights include a temple of Apoll
Pausanias, Description of Greece, Phocis and Ozolian Locri, chapter 38 (search)
The territory of the Locrians called Ozolian adjoins Phocis opposite Cirrha. I have heard various stories about the surname of these Locrians, all of which I will tell my readers. Orestheus, son of Deucalion, king of the land, had a bitch that gave birth to a stick instead of a puppy. Orestheus buried the stick, and in the spring, it is said, a vine grew from it, and from the branches (ozoi) of the stick the people got their name. Others believe that Nessus, ferrying on the Evenus, was wounded by Heracles, but not killed on the spot, making his escape to this country; when he died his body rotted unburied, imparting a foul stench to the atmosphere of the place. The third story says that the exhalations from a certain river, and its very water, have a peculiar smell; the fourth, that asphodel grows in great abundance and when in flower...because of the smell. Another story says that the first dwellers here were aboriginals, but as yet not knowing how to weave garments they used to make
Pindar, Pythian (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien), Pythian 3 For Hieron of Syracuse Horse Race ?474 B. C. (search)
a son of Apollo or of his father Zeus. And I would have gone on a ship, cleaving the Ionian waters, to the fountain of Arethusa and the presence of my Aetnaean host, the king who rules Syracuse, gentle to his citizens, bearing no envious grudge against good men, a marvellous father to his guests. If I had reached his shores bringing a double blessing, golden health and a victory-song to add brilliance to his garlands from the Pythian games, which once Pherenicus took when he was the best at Cirrha,I say that I would have come across the deep sea to him as a light that shines farther than a star of the sky. But I, for my part, want to offer a prayer to the Mother, the revered goddess whose praises, with those of Pan, girls often sing at night beside my doorway.Hieron, if you are skilled in understanding the true essence of words, you have learned and know the saying of former times: “The immortals dispense to men two pains for every blessing.” Fools cannot bear their pain with grace, b
Pindar, Pythian (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien), Pythian 7 For Megacles of Athens Four-Horse Chariot Race 486 B. C. (search)
Pythian 7 For Megacles of Athens Four-Horse Chariot Race 486 B. C. The great city of Athens is the most beautiful prelude of song, which the widely powerful race of the Alcmaeonids can lay as a foundation of odes in honor of their horses.What fatherland, what family will you name that is more illustrious in Greece? For in all cities the storyof the citizens of Erechtheus makes the rounds, Apollo, how they made your dwelling in divine Pytho a marvel to see. Five Isthmian victories lead my song forward, and one outstanding triumphat Zeus' Olympian games, and two from Cirrha— yours, Megacles, and your ancestors'. I rejoice at this new success; but I grieve that fine deeds are repaid with envy.It is true what they say: the abiding bloom of good fortune brings with it both good and bad.
Pindar, Pythian (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien), Pythian 8 For Aristomenes of Aegina Wrestling 446 B. C. (search)
Arrogance in the flood. Porphyrion did not know your power, when he provoked you beyond all measure. Gain is most welcome, when one takes it from the home of a willing giver. Violence trips up even a man of great pride, in time. Cilician Typhon with his hundred heads did not escape you, nor indeed did the king of the Giants.Porphyrion, mentioned above. One was subdued by the thunderbolt, the other by the bow of Apollo, who with a gracious mind welcomed the son of Xenarces on his return from Cirrha, crowned witha garland of laurel from Parnassus and with Dorian victory-song. His island with her just city has not fallen far from the Graces, having attained the famous excellence of the Aeacidae; she has had perfectglory from the beginning. She is praised in song for having fostered heroes who were supreme in many victory-bearing contests and in swift battles; and she is distinguished in these things even for her men. But I do not have the time to set uptheir whole long story to the lyre
Pindar, Pythian (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien), Pythian 10 For Hippocleas of Thessaly Boys« Double Foot Race 498 B. C. (search)
rying his hand at contests, and the gorge of Parnassus proclaimed him to the people that live around as the greatest of the boys in the double-course footrace.Apollo, the end and the beginning both grow sweet when a god urges on a man«s work. No doubt he accomplished this with the help of your counsels. Kinship has stepped into the footprints of the father, who was twice an Olympic victor in the war-enduring armor of Ares;and the contest in the deep meadow that stretches beneath the rock of Cirrha made Phricias victorious in the race. May a good fate follow them in their future days as well, so that their noble wealth will blossom; having received no small share of the delights of Greece, may they encounter no envious reversals at the hands of the gods. A god«s heart should be free from pain; but a man is considered fortunate, and wise poets sing his praises, if he wins victory with his hands or the excellence of his feet, and takes the greatest prizes through his courage and strength
Pindar, Pythian (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien), Pythian 11 For Thrasydaeus of Thebes Foot Race or Double Foot Race 474 or 454 B. C. (search)
r of the Nereid sea-nymphs: come, with the mother of Heracles, greatest in birth, to the presence of Melia; come to the sanctuary of golden tripods,the treasure-house which Loxias honored above all and named the Ismenion, true seat of prophecy. Come, children of Harmonia, where even now he calls the native host of heroines to assemble, so that you may loudly sing of holy Themis and Pytho and the justnavel of the earth, at the edge of evening, in honor of seven-gated Thebes and the contest at Cirrha, in which Thrasydaeus caused his ancestral hearth to be remembered by flinging over it a third wreathas a victor in the rich fields of Pylades, the friend of Laconian Orestes, who indeed, when his father was murdered, was taken by his nurse Arsinoe from the strong hands and bitter deceit of Clytaemnestra, when she sent the Dardanian daughter of Priam,Cassandra, together with the soul of Agamemnon, to the shadowy bank of Acheron with her gray blade of bronze, the pitiless woman. Was it Iphige
Polybius, Histories, book 5, Execution of Leontius (search)
Execution of Leontius The expedition to Phocis proving a failure, the king was retiring from Elatea; and while this was going on, Megaleas removed to Athens, leaving Leontius behind him as his security for his twenty talents fine. Flight of Megaleas. The Athenian Strategi however refused to admit him, and he therefore resumed his journey and went to Thebes. Meanwhile the king put to sea from the coast of Cirrha and sailed with his guardsHypaspists, originally a bodyguard to the king, had been extended in number and formed one or more distinct corps of light infantry (Grote, ch. 92). to the harbour of Sicyon, whence he went up to the city and, excusing himself to the magistrates, took up his quarters with Aratus, and spent the whole of his time with him, ordering Apelles to sail back to Corinth. Leontius put to death. But upon news being brought him of the proceedings of Megaleas, he despatched the peltasts, whose regular commander was Leontius, in the charge of Taurion to Triphylia,
M. Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia (ed. Sir Edward Ridley), book 3, line 169 (search)
Meanwhile all nations of the earth were moved To share in Magnus' fortunes and the war, And in his fated ruin. Graecia sent, Nearest of all, her succours to the host. From Cirrha and Parnassus' double peak And from Amphissa, Phocis sent her youth: From swift Cephisus' fate-declaring stream, And Theban Dirce, chiefs Boeotian came: All Pisa mustered and Alpheus' youths,It was generally believed that the river Alpheus of the Peloponnesus passed under the sea and reappeared in the fountain of Arethusa at Syracuse. A goblet was said to have been thrown into the river in Greece, and to have reappeared in the Sicilian fountain. See the note in Grote's 'History of Greece,' Edition 1862, vol. ii., p. 8. Alpheus who in far Sicilian lands Beyond the billows seeks the day again: Arcadian Maenalus, and OEta loved By Hercules, and old Dodona's oaks Are left to silence; for the sacred train With all Epirus rushes to the war. Athens, deserted at the call to arms, Yet found three vessels in Apollo's
M. Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia (ed. Sir Edward Ridley), book 6, line 263 (search)
ive tree, and Poseidon a horse. Homer also places the scene of this event in Thessaly. (Iliad, xxiii., 247.) Struck by the trident of the Ocean King, Omen of dreadful war; here first he learned, Champing the bit and foaming at the curb, Yet to obey his lord. From yonder shore The keel of pine first floated,The Argo. Conf. Book III., 225 and bore men To dare the perilous chance of seas unknown: And here Ionus ruler of the land First from the furnace molten masses drew Of iron and brass; here first the hammer fell To weld them, shapeless; here in glowing stream Ran silver forth and gold, soon to receive The minting stamp. 'Twas thus that money came Whereby men count their riches, cause accursed Of warfare. Hence came down that Python huge On Cirrha: hence the laurel wreath which crowns The Pythian victor: here Aloeus' sons Gigantic rose against the gods, what time Pelion had almost touched the stars supreme, And Ossa's loftier peak amid the sky Opposing, barred the constellations' way.
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