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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: November 21, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
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Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 2.13, chapter 2.26 (search)
nent, lighted on West Africa and its affairs, dipped into the liquor traffic; then suddenly flew towards Uganda, and, after a short rest, continued his flight to Zanzibar and Pemba. As an exhibition of the personal interest he took in matters abroad, in little-known countries, no fault could be found with his discursive flightsth, sitting beside me, was on his feet in an instant; but what he said seemed to me rather an indistinct echo of what his brother C. S. Smith (formerly Consul at Zanzibar) thinks of Zanzibar slavery. I rose, a trifle after he finished; but the veteran, Tommy Bowles, was ahead of me, and what he said was fatal to the repose, andZanzibar slavery. I rose, a trifle after he finished; but the veteran, Tommy Bowles, was ahead of me, and what he said was fatal to the repose, and concentration, of mind necessary for a speech. He speaks excellently, and delivers good, solid matter. My surprise at his power, and my interest in what he said, was so great, that I could not continue the silent evolution of thought in which I should have engaged, had he been less interesting and informing; and here I ought to
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 2.13, Index (search)
d in the Caucasus, 245, 246; on Rev. Dr. Harman, 246; sees the Carnival at Odessa, 247; in the East, 247-249; arrives at Zanzibar, 250; starts from Zanzibar in search of Livingstone, 251 252; reads Bible and newspapers in wilds of Africa, 252-255; hiZanzibar in search of Livingstone, 251 252; reads Bible and newspapers in wilds of Africa, 252-255; his feeling of tranquillity when in Africa, 255; his ideas on being good-tempered in Africa, 256; in Ugogo, 256; in Unyanyembe, 257, 258; hears of a grey-bearded man, 259; pays heavy tribute to the natives, 259, 260; sees Lake Tanganyika, 261, 262; arrlings at news of death of Livingstone, 295, 296; conception of plan to explore Africa, 295-298. Makes preparations in Zanzibar, 298, 299; proceeds inland, 299-301; his camp attacked, 302-304; arrives at the Victoria Nyanza, 305; circumnavigates th. and Mrs., 60, 61. Winton, Sir Francis de, 338, 419. Wolseley, Lord, on Coomassie, 293; on Stanley, 294. Workhouse, St. Asaph Union, 10-34. Worsfold, Basil, on Sir George Grey, 379. Yarmouth, 450-452. Zanzibar, 250, 251, 280, 298.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Stanley, Henry Morton (search)
St. Asaph he gave a dinner to the children, and told them that what success he had attained in life he owed to the education received there. Returning to the United States, he was engaged in 1868, by the proprietor of the New York Herald to accompany the British expedition to Abyssinia, as correspondent. In the fall of 1869 he was commissioned by the proprietor of the Herald to find Dr. Livingstone. After visiting several countries in the East, he sailed from Bombay (Oct. 12, 1870) for Zanzibar, where he arrived early in January, 1871, and set out for the interior of Africa (March 21), with 192 followers. He found Livingstone (Nov. 10), and reported to the British Association Aug. 16, 1872, and in 1873 he received the patron's medal of the Royal Geographical Society. He was commissioned by the proprietors of the New York Herald and the London Telegraph to explore the lake region of Central Africa. He set out from the eastern coast in November, 1874, with 300 men. When he reache
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Steam navigation. (search)
on Board.Date of Leaving Port. PresidentBritish and American S. N. CompanyBritish136March 11, 1841 PacificCollins LineAmerican240Sept. 23, 1856 TempestAnchor LineBritish150Feb. 26, 1857 United KingdomAnchor LineBritish 80April 17, 1868 City of BostonInman LineBritish177Jan. 28, 1870 ScanderiaAnglo Egyptian LineBritish 38Oct. 8, 1872 IsmailiaAnchor LineBritish 52Sept. 27, 1873 ColomboWilson LineBritish44January, 1877 Herman LudwigGerman50Sept. 28, 1878 HomerBritish43Dec. 17, 1878 ZanzibarBritish48Jan. 11, 1879 SurbitonBritish33Feb. 18 1879 BcrniciaBritish45March 19, 1879 City of LimerickBritish43Jan. 8, 1881 City of LondonBritish41Nov. 13, 1881 Straits of DoverBritish27Jan. 3, 1883 ConistonBritish27Dec. 24, 1884 FerwoodBritish25Jan. 20, 1885 PrestonBritish29Jan. 20, 1885 ClandonBritish27Jan. 24, 1885 HumberBritish56Feb. 15, 1885 ErinNational Line British72Dec. 31, 1889 ThanemorcJohnston LineBritish43Nov. 26, 1890 NaronicWhite Star LineBritishFebruary, 1893 s
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Treaties. (search)
navigation, extraditionCaracasAug. 27, 1860 Convention of Referring claimsCaracasApril 25, 1866 Wurtemberg: Convention of Abolishing droit d'aubaine and taxes on emigrationBerlinApril 10, 1844 Treaty of NaturalizationStuttgartJuly 27, 1868 Zanzibar: Convention of Enlarging treaty with Muscat, 1833ZanzibarJuly 3, 1886 General conventions. Convention with Belgium, Brazil, Dominican Republic, France, Great Britain, Guatemala, Italy, the Netherlands, Norway, Portugal, Salvador, Servia, SpZanzibarJuly 3, 1886 General conventions. Convention with Belgium, Brazil, Dominican Republic, France, Great Britain, Guatemala, Italy, the Netherlands, Norway, Portugal, Salvador, Servia, Spain, Sweden, Swiss Confederation, and Tunis; conventions for the protection of industrial property; signed at ParisMar. 20, 1883 Convention with Belgium, Brazil, Italy, Portugal, Servia, Spain, and Switzerland, for exchange of official documents and literary publications; signed at BrusselsMar. 15, 1886 Convention with Germany, Great Britain and Ireland, general act for neutrality of Samoan Islands; signed at BerlinJune 14. 1889 Convention with foreign powers for an international union to pub
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4, Chapter 8: to England and the Continent.—1867. (search)
on to two days compelled a pre-arranged and inflexible programme. The various papers read or contributed dealt with the East African slave trade, slavery in Cuba and Brazil, and the results of emancipation in the British Colonies and the United States; and addresses beseeching their sympathy and cooperation in suppressing slavery and the slave trade in their dominions were subsequently presented in the name of the Conference to the sovereigns of Brazil, Portugal, Spain, Turkey, Egypt, and Zanzibar. Mr. Garrison, who was warmly recognized and greeted by the Conference as its most eminent member, gave a brief retrospect of the anti-slavery struggle in America, and presented the cheering statistics furnished him by the American Freedman's Union Commission as to the work already accomplished in the education and elevation of the freedmen, upon whom the elective franchise had now been conferred, under the reconstruction law recently Mar. 23, 1867. enacted by Congress. He closed with
head is constantly springing up anew, from its pillow of ashes. And, in turn, what endless delight children find in the manipulation of a fire What a variety of playthings, too, in this fuel of ours; such inexplicable pieces, treenails and tholepins, trucks and sheaves, the lid of a locker, and a broken handspike. These larger fragments are from spars and planks and knees. Some were dropped overboard in this quiet harbor; others may have floated from Fayal or Hispaniola, Mozambique or Zanzibar. This eagle figure-head, chipped and battered, but still possessing highly aquiline features and a single eye, may have tangled its curved beak in the vast weed-beds of the Sargasso Sea, or dipped it in the Sea of Milk. Tell us your story, O heroic but dilapidated bird! and perhaps song or legend may find in it themes that shall be immortal. The eagle is silent, and I suspect, Annie, that he is but a plain, home-bred fowl after all. But what shall we say to this piece of plank, hung
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.10 (search)
e entitled to leave the ship. Of course, all answered, as they were instructed, and officers and crew parted as they had met on that Liverpool dock thirteen months before. The ship was turned over to the United States Consul, at Liverpool, who tried to send her to America, but she refused. Three days out she encountered a heavy storm, and returned in a battered condition. After some months lying elephant-like on the hands of the American Government, she was sold at auction to the Sultan of Zanzibar, who used her as a pleasure craft. But some years later, as if disgusted with a life of such ignoble ease, she suddenly foundered with all on board. Such is the history of the Shenandoah and her historic cruise. She had in her short career circumnavigated the globe, had printed the memory of the Stars and Bars upon every sea, and, from sunland never changing tropic skies to the fair Arctic zone, the boom of her gun had commanded the marine of her enemy to surrender. James Riley.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Shenandoah. (search)
owfully lowered, this historic act taking place at 10 A. M. on the 6th of November, 1865. The vessel was then given in charge to the British government. For a day or two some correspondence was in progress between the British and American authorities in regard to the Shenandoah, her officers and crew. But on the 8th of November the crew were suffered to depart, and soon the British government turned the vessel over to the United States authorities, by whom she was sold to the Sultan of Zanzibar, and later she was lost at sea. She was the only vessel that carried the Confederate flag around the world, and she bore it at her mast head seven months after the surrender of the Southern armies and the obliteration of the Southern Confederacy. In her cruise of thirteen months, she ran 58,000 miles, and met with no accident, and for a period of eight months, she did not drop her anchor. She destroyed more vessels than any other ship of war known to history, except alone the Alabama
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The cruise of the Shenandoah. (search)
e effects. Thus ended our memorable cruise—grand in its conception. Grand in its execution, and unprecedentally, awfully grand in its sad finale. To the four winds the gallant crew scattered, most of them never to meet again until called to the Bar of that Highest of all Tribunals. The ship was handed over to the United States agents, a Captain Freeman was appointed to take her to New York, but going out and encountering high west winds, lost light spars and returned to Liverpool. It was not tried again. The noble vessel was put up and sold to the Sultan of Zanzibar. She finally was lost on a coral reef in the Indian Ocean in 1879— fourteen years after the last Confederate flag was hauled down. [The flag of the Shenandoah, reverently preserved by the late Colonel Richard Launcelot Maury, C. S. A., son of Commissioner Matthew Fontaine Maury, was recently deposited with the Confederate Memorial Literary Society, and is preserved in the Museum Building at Richmond, Va.
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