Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for Fort Morgan (Alabama, United States) or search for Fort Morgan (Alabama, United States) in all documents.

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), United States of America. (search)
ec. 27, 1860 United States arsenal, with 75,000 stands of arms, seized by South Carolina State troops at Charleston......Dec. 30, 1860 Edward D. Baker, of Oregon, answers the plea of Judah P. Benjamin, of Louisiana, in the Senate for the right of secession......Jan. 2, 1861 Fort Pulaski, at the mouth of the Savannah River, Ga., seized by Georgia State troops......Jan. 3, 1861 United States arsenal seized at Mount Vernon, Ala., by the Alabama State troops......Jan. 4, 1861 Forts Morgan and Gaines, at the entrance of Mobile Bay, seized by the Alabama State troops......Jan. 5, 1861 Fernando Wood, mayor of New York, recommends secession to the common council......Jan. 6, 1861 United States arsenal at Apalachicola, Fla., seized by the Florida State troops......Jan. 6, 1861 Fort Marion and Fort St. Augustine, Fla., seized by Florida State troops......Jan. 7, 1861 Robert Toombs, Senator from Georgia, delivers his last speech in the Senate......Jan. 7, 1861 Star
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Alabama (search)
whites, 526,431; negro slaves, 435,080; free negroes, 2,690)—964,201......1860 The General Assembly by resolution requires the governor, if a Black Republican be elected President of the United States in November, to order elections of delegates to a constitutional convention ... Feb. 24, 1860) Alabama passes an ordinance of secession by 61 to 39; the fourth State to secede ..................... Jan. 11, 1861 Alabama seizes United States arsenal and arms at Mobile, and occupies Forts Morgan and Gaines at entrance of Mobile Bay ................. January, 1861 Provisional Congress of delegates from six seceded States meet at Montgomery ... Feb. 4, 1861 Adopt a provisional constitution ... Feb. 8, 1861 Jefferson Davis inaugurated President of the Confederacy at Montgomery ... Feb. 18, 1861 Seat of Confederate government removed from Montgomery to Richmond, Va ................... ....... July, 1861 There were liberated by the emancipation proclamation 435,132 slav<
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), War of 1812, (search)
...Sept. 12, 1814 They find the city too well fortified, and retire......Sept. 13, 1814 British fleet bombard Fort McHenry......Sept. 13, 1814 [During this attack Francis Scott Key wrote The Star-Spangled banner.] British attack on Fort Bowyer, Mobile Bay, repulsed......Sept. 15, 1814 Garrison at Fort Erie by a sortie break up the siege......Sept. 17, 1814 General Drummond raises the siege of Fort Erie......Sept. 21, 1814 Wasp captures the British brig Atlanta......Sept. 21ommodore Decatur commanding, is captured by the British frigates Endymion, forty guns, the Pomone, Tenedos, and Majestic......Jan. 15, 1815 Frigate Constitution captures the Cyane and the Levant, British sloops-of-war......February, 1815 Fort Bowyer, invested by the British fleet, surrenders......Feb. 12, 1815 Sloop-of-war Hornet, Capt. James Biddle, captures the British brig-of-war Penguin off the Cape of Good Hope......March 23, 1815 See also Jackson, Andrew; New Orleans; and read
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Whiting, William Henry 1843- (search)
in New York City, July 8, 1843; graduated at the United States Naval Academy in 1863; was with the West Gulf Squadron on the flag-ship Hartford in 1863-65; won distinction by burning the blockade-runner Ivanhoe, though defended by the guns of Fort Morgan, July 5, 1864; raised the American flag at the fall of Fort Gaines; was present during the action of Mobile Bay and at the capitulation of Fort Morgan; he was promoted captain, June 19, 1897; went to the Philippines in command of the Monadnockduring the action of Mobile Bay and at the capitulation of Fort Morgan; he was promoted captain, June 19, 1897; went to the Philippines in command of the Monadnock in 1898; was in command of the cruiser Charleston when the insurrection began in the islands; participated in the battles around Manila, and was present in the action at Caloocan. In May, 1899, he was placed in command of the Boston, which he took to San Francisco; and in March, 1900, took command of the receiving-ship Independence.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Wildes, Frank 1843- (search)
Wildes, Frank 1843- Naval officer; born in Boston, Mass., June 17, 1843; graduated at the United States Naval Academy in 1863, and assigned to the steam-sloop Lackawanna, in the West Gulf blockading squadron; participated in the battle of Mobile Bay, and aided in the capture of Fort Morgan; served on the monitor Chickasaw during the actions in Mobile Bay in March and April, 1865; promoted master in 1866; commander in 1880; and captain in 1894. He commanded the protected cruiser Boston in the battle of Manila Bay on May 1, 1898; was appointed captain of the United States navy-yard in Brooklyn, N. Y., April 1, 1899; and was promoted rear-admiral, Oct. 14, 1901.
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