hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 22 0 Browse Search
C. Julius Caesar, Commentaries on the Civil War (ed. William Duncan) 20 0 Browse Search
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874. 20 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 18 0 Browse Search
M. Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia (ed. Sir Edward Ridley) 16 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 14 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 14 0 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, Orations, for Quintius, Sextus Roscius, Quintus Roscius, against Quintus Caecilius, and against Verres (ed. C. D. Yonge) 12 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Army Life in a Black Regiment 12 0 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, Orations, The fourteen orations against Marcus Antonius (Philippics) (ed. C. D. Yonge) 12 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation. You can also browse the collection for Africa or search for Africa in all documents.

Your search returned 118 results in 47 document sections:

1 2 3 4 5
The Ile of Forteventura.THE Ile of Forteventura standeth fifty leagues from the promontory of Cabo de Guer, in the firme land of Africa , and foure & twenty leagues distant from Canaria Estward. This Iland doth appertaine to the lord of Lanzarota. It is reasonable fruitfull of wheat and barley, and also of kine, goats, and orchel: this Ile is fifteene leagues long and ten leagues broad. On the North side it hath a little Iland about one league distant from the maine Iland, betweene both of the which it is navigable for any ships, and is called Graciosa . Both Forteventura and Lanzarota have very little wine of the growth of those Ilands. It standeth in 27 degrees. Thus much have I written of these seven Ilands by experience, because I was a dweller there, as I have sayd before, the space of seven yeeres in the affaires of master Thomas Locke, master Anthonie Hickman, and master Edward Castelin, who in those dayes were worthy merchants, and of great credite
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A voiage made out of England unto Guinea and Benin in Affrike, at the charges of certaine marchants Adventurers of the Citie of London, in the yeere of our Lord 1553. (search)
ly understood of all men, I have thought good for this purpose, before I intreat hereof, to make a briefe description of Africa , being that great part of the world, on whose West side beginneth the coast of Guinea at Cabo Verde, about twelve degreeainly appeare in the description of the second voyage. A briefe description of Afrike gathered by Richard Eden. IN Africa the lesse are these kingdoms: the kingdom of Tunis and Constantina , which is at this day under Tunis , and also the re the great master of the Rhodes. Under the South of this kingdom are the great deserts of Lybia. All the nations in this Africa the lesse are of the sect of Mahomet, and a rusticall people, living scattred in villages. The best of this part of AfriGentiles, and idolatrous, without profession of any religion, or other knowledge of God, then by the law of nature. Africa the great is one of the three parts of the world, knowen in old time, and severed from Asia, on the East by the river Ni
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The second voyage to Guinea set out by Sir George Barne, Sir John Yorke, Thomas Lok, Anthonie Hickman and Edward Castelin, in the yere 1554. The Captaine whereof was M. John Lok. (search)
mewhat of the people and their maners, and maner of living, with an other briefe description of Africa also. It is to be understood, that the people which now inhabite the regions of the coast of Guinea, and the midle parts of Africa , as Libya the inner, and Nubia , with divers other great & large regions about the same, were in old time called Æthiopes and Nigritae, which we now call Marrying with them great gourdes of water. The Ethiopians called Nigritae occupy a great part of Africa , and are extended to the West Ocean. Southward also they reach to the river Nigritis, whose natame are in every globe and card, it were here superfluous to rehearse them. Some write that Africa was so named by the Grecians, because it is without colde. For the Greeke letter Alpha or A siganer already halfe way in Purgatorie or hell. Gemma Phrisius writeth, that in certaine parts of Africa , as in Atlas the greater, the aire in the night season is scene shining, with many strange fire
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A voyage with three tall ships, the Penelope Admirall, the Marchant royall Viceadmirall, and the Edward Bonaventure Rereadmirall, to the East Indies, by the Cape of Buona Speransa, to Quitangone neere Mosambique, to the Iles of Comoro and Zanzibar on the backeside of Africa , and beyond Cape Comori in India, to the lies of Nicubar and of Gomes Polo within two leagues of Sumatra, to the Ilands of Pulo Pinaom, and thence to the maine land of Malacca, begunne by M. George Raymond, in the yeere 1591, and performed by M. James Lancaster, and written from the mouth of Edmund Barker of Ipswich, his lieutenant in the sayd voyage, by M. Richard Hakluyt. (search)
l ships, the Penelope Admirall, the Marchant royall Viceadmirall, and the Edward Bonaventure Rereadmirall, to the East Indies, by the Cape of Buona Speransa, to Quitangone neere Mosambique, to the Iles of Comoro and Zanzibar on the backeside of Africa , and beyond Cape Comori in India, to the lies of Nicubar and of Gomes Polo within two leagues of Sumatra, to the Ilands of Pulo Pinaom, and thence to the maine land of Malacca, begunne by M. George Raymond, in the yeere 1591, and performed by M.ons a whole day. And this skole of fish continued with our ship for the space of five or sixe weekes, all which while we tooke to the quantitie aforesayd, which was no small refreshing to us. In February 1593. we fell with the Eastermost land of Africa at a place called Baia de Agoa some 100 leagues to the Northeast of the Cape of Good Hope: and finding the winds contrary, we spent a moneth or five weekes before we could double the Cape. After wee had doubled it in March folowing, wee directed
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The Letters patents or priviledges granted by her Majestic to certaine Noble men and Marchants of London, for a trade to Barbarie, in the yeere 1585. (search)
Holmden, John Swinnerton, Robert Walkaden, Simon Lawrence, Nicholas Stile, Oliver Stile, William Bond, Henrie Farrington, John Tedcastle, Walter Williams, William Brune, John Suzan, John Newton, Thomas Owen, Roger Afield, Robert Washborne, Reinold Guy, Thomas Hitchcocke, George Lydiat, John Cartwright, Henry Paiton, John Boldroe, Robert Bowyer, Anthonie Dassell, Augustine Lane, Robert Lion, and Thomas Dod, all of London, Marchants now trading into the Countrey of Barbary, in the parts of Africa , under the government of Muly Hammet Sheriffe, Emperor of Marocco, and king of Fesse and Sus, have sustained great and grievous losses, and are like to sustaine greater if it should not be prevented: In tender consideration whereof, and for that divers Marchandize of the same Countries are very necessary and convenient for the use and defence of this our Realme of England, and for divers other causes us specially moving, minding the reliefe and benefite of our said subjects, and the qui
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The voiage set forth by M. John Newton, and M. John Bird marchants of London to the kindome and Citie of Benin in Africa , with a ship called the Richard of Arundell, and a pinnesse, in the yere 1588. briefely set downe in this letter following, written by the chiefe Factor in the voyage to the foresaid Marchants at the time of the ships first arrivall at Plimouth. (search)
The voiage set forth by M. John Newton, and M. John Bird marchants of London to the kindome and Citie of Benin in Africa , with a ship called the Richard of Arundell, and a pinnesse, in the yere 1588. briefely set downe in this letter following, written by the chiefe Factor in the voyage to the foresaid Marchants at the time of the ships first arrivall at Plimouth. WORSHIPFUL Sirs, the discourse of our whole proceeding in this voyage wil aske more time and a person in better health then I am at this present, so that I trust you will pardon me, till my comming up to you: in the meane time let this suffice. Whereas we departed in the moneth of December from the coast of England with your good ship the Richard of Arundell and the pinnesse, we held on our direct course towards our appointed port, and the 14 day of Februarie following we arrived in the haven of Benin , where we found not water enough to carry the ship over the barre, so that we left her without in the road, and with the p
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A relation sent by Melchior Petoney to Nigil de Moura at Lisbon , from the Iland and Castle of Arguin, standing a little to the Southward of Cape Blanco, in the Northerly latitude of 19 degrees, concerning the rich and secret trade from the inland of Africa thither: Anno 1591. (search)
A relation sent by Melchior Petoney to Nigil de Moura at Lisbon , from the Iland and Castle of Arguin, standing a little to the Southward of Cape Blanco, in the Northerly latitude of 19 degrees, concerning the rich and secret trade from the inland of Africa thither: Anno 1591.As concerning the trade to this Castle and Iland of Arguin, your worship is to understand, that if it would please the kings majesty to send hither two or three caravels once in a yeere with Flanders and Spanish commodities, as Bracelets of glasse, Knives, Belles, Linnencloth, Looking-glasses, with other kinds of small wares, his highnesse might do great good here. For 50 leagues up into the land the Moores have many exceeding rich golde mines; insomuch that they bring downe their golde to this Castle to traffique with us: and for a small trifle they will give us a great wedge of gold. And because here is no trade, the sayd Moores cary their golde to Fez being 250 leagues distant from hence, and there doe exchan
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The voyage of Richard Rainolds and Thomas Dassel to the rivers of Senega and Gambra adjoyning upon Guinea, 1591, with a discourse of the treasons of certain of Don Antonio his servants and followers. (search)
The voyage of Richard Rainolds and Thomas Dassel to the rivers of Senega and Gambra adjoyning upon Guinea, 1591, with a discourse of the treasons of certain of Don Antonio his servants and followers. BY vertue of her Majesties most gracious charter given in the yeere 1588, and in the thirtieth yeere of her Highnesse reigne, certaine English marchants are granted to trade, in and from the river of Senega to and in the river of Gambra, on the Westerne coast of Africa . The chiefest places of traffique on that coast betweene these rivers, are these: 1 Senega river: The commodities be hides, gumme, elephants teeth, a few graines, ostrich feathers, ambergriece, and some golde. 2 Beseguiache, a towne by Capo Verde leagues from Senega river: The commodities be small hides, and a few teeth. 3 Refisca Viejo, a towne 4 leagues from Beseguiache: The commodities be small hides, and a few teeth now and then. 4 Palmerin, a towne 2 leagues from Refisca: The commodities be small hides
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, Another briefe relation concerning the late conquest and the exceeding great riches of the cities and provinces of Tombuto and Gago, written from Marocco the 30 August 1594, to M. Anthony Dassel marchant of London aforesayd. (search)
e king of Spaine hath quietnesse in Christendome, he wil thrust him out: for that the kings force is not great as yet; but he meaneth to be stronger. There is a campe ready to go now with a viceroy: the speech is with 3000 men: but I thinke they will be hardly 2000; for by report, 3000 men are enough to conquer all the countrey: for they have no defence of importance against an enemy. I thinke Hamode will be returned home in January or thereabout: for he stayeth but for the comming of the viceroy. Mulley Balasen the kings sonne of Marocco was slaine in Guinea by his owne men, and they were presently killed, because they should tell no tales. And thus leaving to trouble you, I commit you to God, who prosper you in all your proceedings. From Marocco the first of August 1594. Yours to command for ever Laurence Madoc. Of these two rich cities and kingdomes of Tombuto and Gago Leo Africanus writeth at large in the beginning of his seventh booke of the description of Africa .
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A true report of the honourable service at Sea perfourmed by Sir John Burrough Knight, Lieutenant generall of the fleet prepared by the honor. Sir Walter Ralegh Knight, Lord warden of the Stanneries of Cornwall and Devon . Wherin chiefly the Santa Clara of Biscay, a ship of 600 tunnes was taken, and the two East Indian caraks, the Santa Cruz and the Madre de Dios were forced, the one burnt, and the other taken and brought into Dartmouth the seventh of September, 1592. (search)
eceived speciall commandement from the king not to touch in any case at the Iland of S. Helena, where the Portugall caraks in their returne from the East India were alwayes till now woont to arrive to refresh themselves with water and victuals. And the kings reason was; because of the English men of warre, who (as he was informed) lay there in wait to intercept them. If therefore their necessity of water should drive them to seeke supply any where, he appointed them Angola in the maine of Africa , with order there to stay onely the taking in of water to avoid the inconvenice of infections, wherunto that hot latitude is dangerously subject. The last rendevous for them all was the Iland of Flores, where the king assured them not to misse of his armada thither sent of purpose for their wafting to Lisbon . Upon this information sir John drew to counsel, meeting there captaine Norton , captaine Dounton, captaine Abraham Cocke, captaines of three ships of the Earle of Cumberland, M. Tom
1 2 3 4 5