Browsing named entities in A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith). You can also browse the collection for 20 AD or search for 20 AD in all documents.

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Marti'na a woman in Syria, celebrated for her skill in poisoning, and a favourite of Plancina, the wife of Cu. Piso, was sent to Italy by Cn. Sentius, the governor of Syria, that she might be brought to trial, but she died suddenly upon her arrival at Brundisium, A. D. 20. (Tac. Ann. 2.74, 3.7.)
Messalla 12. M. Valerius Messalla, M. F., consul in A. D. 20, moved at the first meeting of the senate under Tiberius, in A. D. 14, that the oath to the emperor (sacramentum) should for the future be repeated annually instead of at intervals of five or ten years (Tac. Ann. 1.8, 3.2; Fasti.)
Nero the eldest son of Germanicus and Agrippina, was a youth of about twelve years of age at the death of his father in A. D. 19. In the following year (A. D. 20) he was commended to the favour of the senate by the emperor Tiberius, who went through the form of requesting that body to allow Nero to become a candidate for the quaestorship five years before the legal age. He likewise had the dignity of pontiff conferred upon him, and about the same time was married to Julia, the daughter of Drusus, who was the son of the emperor Tiberius. Nero had been betrothed in the lifetime of his father to the daughter of Silanus (Tac. Ann. 2.43), but it appears that this marriage never took effect. By the death of Drusus, the son of Tiberius, who was poisoned at the instigation of Sejanus in A. D. 23, Nero became the heir to the imperial throne; and as Sejanus had compassed the death of Drusus, in order that he might succeed Tiberius, the same motives led him to plan the death of Nero, as well as
n neglected or disobeyed. Hence arose vehement altercations between him and Piso; and when the former fell ill in the autumn of this year, he believed that he had been poisoned by Piso and Plancina. Before his death he had ordered Piso to quit Syria, and had appointed Cn. Santius as his successor. Piso now made an attempt to recover his province, but the Roman soldiers refused to obey him, and Sentius drove him out of the country. Relying on the protection of Tiberius Piso now went to Rome (A. D. 20); but he was received by the people with marks of the utmost dislike and horror. Whether Piso had poisoned Gernmanicus cannot now be determined; Tacitus candidly admits that there were no proofs of his having done so; but the popular belief in his gilt was so strong that Tiberius could not refuse an investigation into the matter, which was conducted by the senate. As it proceeded the emperor seemed to have made up his mind to sacrifice his tool to the general indignation; but before the inv
Piso 25. M. Calpurnius Piso, the younger son of No. 23, accompanied his father into Syria, and was accused along with him in A. D. 20. [See above, No. 23.]
n the same year he gave another instance of the little respect which he entertained for the imperial family. Urgulania, the favourite of the empressmother, owed Piso a certain sum of money; and when she refused to obey the summons to appear before the praetor, Piso followed her to the palace of Livia, and insisted upon being paid. Although Tiberius, at the commencement of his reign, had not thought it advisable to resent the conduct of Piso, yet he was not of a temper to forgive it, and only waited for a favourable opportunity to revenge himself upon his haughty subject. Accordingly, when he considered his power sufficiently established, Q. Granius appeared in A. D. 24, as the accuser of Piso, charging him with entertaining designs against the emperor's life; but Piso died just before the trial came on (Tac. Ann. 2.34, 4.21). He is probably the same as the L. Piso, who came forward to defend Cn. Piso [No. 23] in A. D. 20, when so many shrunk from the unpopular office. (Tac. Ann. 3.11.)
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Plau'tia Urgulanilla the first wife of the emperor Claudius, who divorced her on account of her lewd conduct, and of her being suspected of murder. She bore two children during her marriage. Drusus, who died at Pompeii in A. D. 20 [DRUSUS, No. 23], and Claudia, whom she had by a freedman of Claudius. and who was therefore exposed by command of the emperor. (Suet. Cl. 26, 27.)
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
and while in this office he took a census of the Jewish people. This is the statement of Josephus, and appears to be at variance with that of Luke, who speaks as if the census or enrolment of Cyrenius was made at the time of the birth of Christ. This discrepancy has given rise to much discussion and various explanations, of which the reader will find an able account in Winer's Biblisches Realwörterbuch, s. v. Quirinius. Quirinus had been married to Aemilia Lepida, whom he divorced; but in A. D. 20, twenty years after the divorce, he brought an accusation against her, because she pretended to have had a son by him. She was at the same time accused of other crimes; but the conduct of Quirinus met with general disapprobation as harsh and revengeful. Tiberius, notwithstanding his dissimulation, was evidently in favour of the prosecution, as he was anxious to conciliate Quirinus, who had no children, and might therefore be expected to leave his property to the emperor. Quirinus died in A.
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Re'gulus, Livineius 3. Livineius Regulus, a senator in the reign of Tiberius, who defended Cn. Piso in A. D. 20, when many of his other friends declined the unpopular office. [PISO, No. 23.] He was afterwards expelled from the senate, though on what occasion is not mentioned; and at a still later time, in the reign of Nero, A. D. 59, he was banished on account of certain disturbances which took place at a show of gladiators which he gave. (Tac. Ann. 3.11, 14.17.)
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Rufus, He'lvius a common soldier, saved the life of a Roman citizen in the war with Tacfarinas in Africa in A. D. 20. (Tac. Ann. 3.21.)
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