Browsing named entities in The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley). You can also browse the collection for June 18th or search for June 18th in all documents.

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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 57 (search)
made, and the corps remained in the position of Wednesday afternoon throughout Thursday, June 16, carrying on the usual skirmishing with the enemy. Thursday night the enemy evacuated his lines, crossed Muddy Creek, and swung back toward Kenesaw Mountain. Thus was he forced from his sixth strongly intrenched position. Early Friday morning the Fourth Corps followed up the enemy, my division leading. The day was spent in driving the enemy's skirmishers and outposts across Muddy Creek. Saturday, June 18, was spent in heavy skirmishing. Saturday night the enemy evacuated his seventh intrenched position and retired to his works around Kenesaw Mountain. Sunday morning the pursuit was renewed and the enemy pressed in on his works. Here the division remained from Sunday, June 19, to Sunday, July 3. Sharp skirmishing was kept up during the whole of this time, and the period was also enlivened with some brilliant affairs and other more serious operations. Some of these affairs are worthy
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 60 (search)
he Eighty-ninth's skirmishers. Casualties, killed, none; wounded, 7; 2 since dead. (See schedule, marked A.) This skirmish was a very gallant and spirited affair, and particularly honorable to the dash and spirit of the Eighty-ninth Illinois. It was then called Bald Mountain. The Eighty-ninth feel entitled to claim they were the first to cross the open field and drive the enemy from their admirably selected and wellconstructed rifle-pits. This under the eye of the division commander. June 18, advanced about 600 yards and built breast-works. During the night of the 18th the enemy abandoned their works, and we advanced. and occupied them. June 20, advanced, deployed as skirmishers. June 21, advanced as support of Forty-ninth and Fifteenth Ohio, deployed as skirmishers. These gallant regiments drove the enemy from a position known as Bald Knob. The Eighty-ninth relieved the Forty-ninth Ohio, which had taken an advanced position in the wood to the right of the knob. The enem
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 73 (search)
enth Kentucky Volunteers-, and Captain Agard, of the Nineteenth Ohio Volunteers, were ordered to drive the, skirmishers of the enemy from their position. This was successfully accomplished, and an advance made to the crest of the ridge, from which the enemy was driven. The line thus gained was speedily fortified. The enemy attempted several times to retake it during the night, but was repulsed. Captain Sturgis, of the Seventeenth Kentucky Volunteers, was here severely wounded. On the 18th of June, in pursuance to orders, the line was advanced until within range of the enemy's works. Severe skirmishing ensued, lasting all day, occasioning the loss of many men in the Seventy-ninth Indiana and Ninth Kentucky Regiments on the skirmish line. On the 19th day of June the brigade remained in rear of the division. On the evening of the 20th it relieved a brigade of General Geary's division, of the Twentieth Army Corps, in position near Kenesaw Mountain. On the 21st of June, at 3 p. m.,
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 74 (search)
d three hours severely. The regiment advanced a short distance to the crest of a second hill, driving the enemy, and there, under a heavy fire of musketry, built a temporary line of rail works. In that position the regiment remained, keeping up a brisk fire and being partly sheltered by works until 11 o'clock at night, when the line was withdrawn by order of the brigade commander. In the action First Lieut. Thomas C. Batchelor was badly wounded and 3 men killed and 15 wounded. On the 18th day of June the entire regiment, with the Ninth Kentucky Volunteers, was placed on the skirmish line near Kenesaw Mountain, Ga., and in advancing the line became warmly engaged with the enemy, which was kept up during the entire day, with the loss of 3 enlisted men killed and 7 wounded. On the 23d day of June the regiment was on picket near Kenesaw Mountain, Ga., and was ordered to advance the line and make a demonstration against the enemy's works, which resulted in the loss of Capt. Daniel W. How
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 75 (search)
y, the front line skirmishing with the enemy, who, it seemed, had a well-chosen position. We bivouacked until June 15, when we evacuated and again fell back. On the evening of the 15th the command occupied Pine Mountain; remained here until June 17, when my regiment was placed on the skirmish line and advanced upon the enemy. Though the resistance was stubborn, yet we succeeded in driving him perhaps a mile. Night coming on, my regiment was relieved and ordered to bivouac till morning. June 18, continued to press upon the enemy, and, notwithstanding the heavy rains which were falling, rendering operations exceedingly difficult and unpleasant, they ceased not, and the duty was performed with cheerfulness. Advanced perhaps a mile and threw up works of rails and mud, but the enemy getting range with a piece of artillery, wounding several of my men, that position was abandoned and I was ordered to the left about 400 yards. June 19, again found the enemy retreating. Ordered to follo
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 82 (search)
Light Battery; Fifth Indiana Battery, and Bridges' Battery, Illinois Light Artillery, were placed in position, and, by order of Major-General Howard, at 5 p. m. concentrated their fire upon the enemy's works and lines in front of General Wood's left and General Newton's right front for one-half hour, after which our lines advanced across a large open field and secured a lodgment within the enemy's first line of works, which line was strengthened and turned upon the enemy during the night. June 18, Battery A, First Ohio Light Artillery; Bridges' Battery, Illinois Light Artillery; Sixth Ohio Light Artillery; Battery M, First Illinois Light Artillery, and Twenty-Sixth Pennsylvania Light Artillery were advanced from 600 to 700 yards in their respective fronts, occupying some hastily-constructed works, and were each engaged. Captain McDowell, with the Twenty-sixth Pennsylvania Light Battery without works, placed a section of his battery within 250 yards of the enemy's works, and assiste
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 87 (search)
of artillery, Second Division, and occupied some works that had been thrown up by pioneers, within 500 yards of the enemy. I improved and strengthened the works that night, and next morning, the enemy having evacuated his line, I proceeded on the 17th with my division to the new line, just inside the enemy's former line, and nearly at right angles with it, being supported by Brigadier-General Wood's division. I fired about 175 rounds of shot and shell by volleys from 4 o'clock to 6 p. m. June 18, I advanced my battery 800 yards, and occupied some slight works. Fired at intervals during the day 457 rounds, but could not see the effect of the shot. On the 19th of June, the enemy having again fallen back, I moved forward to near the foot of Kenesaw Mountain, firing at different points as opportunity offered. I rested at night in position on the left of the main road near an old cotton press. On the afternoon of the 20th I advanced half a mile to the front and occupied some slight
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 96 (search)
orward about two miles in support of the Second and Third Brigades. June 15.-The command remained in reserve until June 16 at 5 p. m., when it relieved the Second Brigade and advanced to the front, about 300 yards, and threw up breast-works. June 17.---The skirmish line was advanced across an open field and drove the enemy's skirmishers from their breast-works in a narrow strip of woods beyond, gaining about 600 yards of ground, and a very favorable position for the skirmishers. June 18.-About daylight this morning the picket-line advanced and drove the enemy's pickets from their rifle-pits, and captured 13 prisoners. The brigade moved forward about 400 yards and threw up works in the field on the right of the main Marietta road. June 19.-Received an order from division headquarters to send out a reconnoitering party of fifty picked men, with instructions to find the enemy, who, it was reported, had abandoned his works. The detachment was selected from the Thirty-thi
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 99 (search)
until June 13, when the enemy seemed to bring us to a halt at Lost Mountain; First Brigade in reserve. June 16, moved forward and occupied a line of works thrown up by the Third Division until evening, when the whole line was advanced to the skirmish line and fortified. June 17, two companies were sent out: to re-enforce and advance the skirmish line, which they did successfully, driving the enemy to their main line of works in front of Kenesaw Mountain; I lost 1 man in this advance. June 18, the enemy withdrew from our front and formed on the mountain while we moved forward and to the right, establishing our line of works less than a mile from theirs; my regiment lost I man, killed by a shell. June 20, relieved by troops from General Baird's division. Passing to the right in rear of Fourth Army Corps I relieved a regiment in General Grose's brigade, of Fourth Corps. June 21, shortly after getting into position the rebels opened on us with shot and shell and continued pretty
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 101 (search)
of interest occurred until the 6th of June; on this day marched in the direction of Kenesaw Mountain about five miles and bivouacked; nothing worthy of notice occurring in the interim. On the — June marched about three miles toward Kenesaw Mountain and camped. From this time to the 17th June, the regiment with the brigade being in reserve, nothing worthy of mention occurred, some changes in situation only being made. On the evening of the 17th June relieved a regiment of Second Brigade. June 18, advanced our line half a mile and constructed works; loss on skirmish line, 1 killed. June 19, the enemy having evacuated his works on our front, in obedience to orders from the general commanding brigade, a party of fifty men, under command of Captain Hinson, were sent out to make a reconnaissance. It was pushed close to the mountain. The party captured an ambulance and driver; loss, I wounded and 1 missing. In night moved toward the mountain and bivouacked. June 20, were moved toward
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