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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Robert Edward Lee. (search)
Robert Edward Lee. An address Delivered at the Dedication of the Lee Monument, by Colonel Archer Anderson. [This chaste, eloquent, and considerate utterance is worthy of its exalted subject and of the impressive occasion, and must be conceded a commanding distinction of its gifted and accomplished author.] Fellow Citizens: A people carves its own image in the monuments of its great men. Not Virginians only, not only those who dwell in the fair land stretching from the Potomah we are here to dedicate and crown with a heroic figure. For, as the Latin poet said, that, wherever the Roman name and sway extended, there should be the sepulchre of Pompey, so to-day, in every part of America, the character and fame of Robert Edward Lee are treasured as a possession for all time. And, if this be true of that great name, what shall be said of the circumstances which surround us on this day of solemn commemoration? That at the end of the first quarter of a century afte
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Letters of R. E. Lee. (search)
Letters of R. E. Lee. His sympathy for his starving and Shoeless men. Pathetic appeals to the Confederate Government for provisions and clothing. May 24, 1890. To the Editor of the Dispatch: I do not know of anything that could possibly be of more absorbing interest to the Army of Northern Virginia than the deep, heartfelt, anxious solicitude of General Lee for the forces under his command; and I do not know where this is so abundantly and so beautifully portrayed as in the letters of General Lee to President Davis, to the Secretary of War, to the Quartermaster and Commissary-General, to the various Generals under him, and to every other person to whom he could by any possibility appeal. The letters will be found in full in Long's Life of Lee. I have extracted from them only such portions as related to the destitute condition of his men and the agony which it occasioned him. They ought to know it. They ought to know that he witnessed it; that it wrung his heart, and
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Lee's Birthday: eminent men of the United States send sentiments for the day—ministers, soldiers, statesmen and scholars each bring an offering. (search)
o bear testimony to the reputation of General Robert E. Lee as one of the greatest soldiers of ther war had come, I pay my modest tribute to Robert E. Lee, the Christian gentleman, the fearless sol. Senator Reagan, of Texas. General Robert E. Lee combined in his own person and charactarles A. Dana, Editor New York sun. Robert E. Lee was a man of ideal personal character. HeWarner. To my mind the greatness of Robert E. Lee lay in the admirable balance of his powersrank Stringfellow, Lee's scout. General Robert E. Lee, the greatest production of America's Moses D. Hoge. The public career of Robert E. Lee forms one of the most impressive and inspiJ. J. White, Lee's intimate friend. Robert E. Lee-Supremely good and great among men. J. J. story, such a type of the ideal man as was Gen. R. E. Lee. Hence-forth, he belongs not to us alone,ecial commemoration of the birthday of General Robert E. Lee. It is well and right that Virgini[5 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Lee as an educator. (search)
Lee as an educator. His zeal for Washington College's welfare. [Richmond times, June 15, 1890.] Interesting Reminiscences of his career as President—His letter to the Hon. D. S. G. Cabell—Unselfish devotion to duty. That General Robert E. Lee was more distinguished than all others in the late war, in a military point of view, is held by most of competent judges. It is not, however, in that respect that I propose to consider him, but only, and that briefly, of his connection with of applying it, and that Washington College offers opportunities at least equal to any other in the State, where the instruction desired to be taught can be made useful and profitable to the people. With great respect, your obedient servant, R. E. Lee. D. S. G. Cabell, of the Senate of Virginia, Richmond. His letters, like those of Washington, are plain in diction, but clear, strong, and to the point. Each used language as a means not as an end. With regard to the land fund, to which
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.21 (search)
Robert E. Lee. [North American Review.] by Jefferson Davis. Robert Edward Lee, gentleman, scholar, gallant soldier, great general, and true Christian, was born in Westmoreland county, Va., on January 19, 1807. He was the youngest son of GRobert Edward Lee, gentleman, scholar, gallant soldier, great general, and true Christian, was born in Westmoreland county, Va., on January 19, 1807. He was the youngest son of General Henry Lee, who was familiarly known as Light Horse Harry in the traditions of the war of the Revolution, and who possessed the marked confidence and personal regard of General Washington. R. E. Lee entered the United States Military AcademR. E. Lee entered the United States Military Academy in the summer of 1825, after which my acquaintance with him commenced. He was, as I remember him, larger and looked more mature than the average pleb, but less so than Mason, who was destined to be the head of his class. His soldierly bearing anknightly Lee from the path of honor and truth. Descended from a long line of illustrious warriors and statesmen, Robert Edward Lee added new glory to the name he bore, and, whether measured by a martial or an intellectual standard, will compare f
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Robert E. Lee. (search)
Robert E. Lee. The Estimate of the Southern leader by a Canadian. The Week, of Canada, contains the following interesting article by T. E. Moberly on Robert E. Lee, suggested by the unveilinRobert E. Lee, suggested by the unveiling of his statue at Richmond: On the 29th of May, at Richmond, Virginia, the French sculptor Mercie's equestrian statue of the immortal Lee was unveiled. The world needs no monument to perpetuate ptered, sovereigns who still rule our spirits from their urns, and pay its meed of homage to Robert E. Lee. The motive which led Lee to share the fortunes of his mother State, Virginia, in the trerance of your kind and generous consideration of myself, I bid you an affectionate farewell. Robert E. Lee, General. In this sublime and pathetic epistle is vividly portrayed a lofty and intrepidrn upon the Continent which produced so great a man. With what sublime appropriateness could Robert E. Lee at his life's close have repeated the memorable words of Horace: Exegi monumentum aere
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The unveiling. [Richmond Dispatch, June 10, 1890.] (search)
The unveiling. [Richmond Dispatch, June 10, 1890.] Petersburg, June 9th, 1890. At an early hour in the afternoon crowds began to wend their way to the cemetery, all bearing flowers and evergreens with which to decorate the graves of the soldiers. The procession was one of the finest ever seen in Petersburg. It was composed of A. P. Hill Camp of veterans, Pickett-Buchanan Camp of Norfolk, R. E. Lee Camp and Sons of Confederate Veterans of Richmond, the Prince George Cavalry, Petersburg Grays, Petersburg Artillery with full battery of guns, the Fire Department with engines beautifully decorated, civil societies, and a long line of citizens. The line was headed by Chief-Marshal Henry and his associates, the ladies of the Memorial Association and the orator of the day, with the Mayor and Miss Hill. It was fully half-past 6 o'clock before the ceremonies commenced in the cemetery, where fully 10,000 people had assembled around the monument and the stand. The scene was an
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Lee's Lieutenants. (search)
f heroes) in a brave attempt to join that part of his corps which had been cut off from the main army. Fell sword in hand. Glorious old Pat Cleburne fell at Franklin leading one of the most superb charges that the world ever saw. But we must restrain our pen, for columns would not suffice even to mention the names of the Confederate Generals who were noted for conspicuous gallantry and an even reckless exposure of their lives. But we must not fail to say that our grand old chief, R. E. Lee, was the bravest of the brave, and that the world's history affords no grander battle pictures than Lee at the Wilderness offering to lead Hood's Texas brigade, and at Spotsylvania Courthouse offering to lead Gordon's division, and afterwards Harris's Mississippi brigade, when, upon all three occasions, the ragged heroes shouted, General Lee to the rear! General Lee to the rear!! We will drive them back if General Lee will go to the rear! Indeed, the pleasant incident which President
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index. (search)
Anderson, Colonel, Archer. His address Robert Edward Lee, 312. Anderson, General Edward C., 65ess of at the Meeting to Erect Monument to Gen. R. E. Lee, 191. Davis, Jefferson, 62, 106; Daniel his estimate of the Life and Character of Gen. R. E. Lee, 362. Davis, Gen Jeff. C., 73. Disting. J. A., Address of, proposing monument to Gen. R. E. Lee, 188; Remarks on laying the corner-stone o121; Magnanimity of, 121; his tribute to General R. E. Lee, 243; on treatment of prisoners, 387. 6. Hampton, General, Wade, tribute to General R. E. Lee, 245. Hardee, General W. J., 68, 73. Johnston, General Joseph E., Estimate of General R. E. Lee, 318. Jones, Jr., Ll.D., Colonel C. Ce Lee Monument, 198; Remarks of, 206. Lee, General R. E., Perfect Manhood of, 105; Jefferson Davir's Guard Reversed, 172; letter to, from General R. E. Lee, 186. Willis, Dr. Francis T., 160. of, 62. Wolseley's, Lord, Tribute to General R. E. Lee, 318. Wooldridge, General, Wm. Beverl
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