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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), William Smith, Governor of Virginia, and Major-General C. S. Army, hero and patriot. (search)
was brought into association were engaged. The mighty figure of Washington still lingered upon the stage; Light-Horse Harry Lee, the hero of the Southern campaigns, great in himself, but to be remembered in all coming time as the father of Robert Edward Lee; and Jefferson, Madison, Monroe and Marshall were at the zenith of their great careers while William Smith was in the tender and receptive days of his early youth. What lessons he learned! What examples he saw around him! What inspiratioparts died only with its annihilation. What then of the man who joined it at sixty-four, and without military training, by sheer force of his own high qualities, won his way to the rank of major-general under the eye and with the approval of Robert E. Lee, and whose conduct in battle extorted the warm admiration of that Rhadamanthine judge, General Jubal A. Early? Their approbation was praise indeed. In the spring of 1863 he was for a second time elected governor. During his first term in
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.26 (search)
he end. We spent that Thursday night in Farmville. On the next morning (Friday) I took my ten men and marched towards the county bridge that crosses the Appomattox, not far from Farmville. I met General Pendleton on the eastern side of the bridge and inquired for Haskell's battalion. He told me that it was coming on, and in a short time I met Colonell Haskell on the Richmond side of the bridge with two batteries of his battalion, which had been marching with him. About this time General Robert E. Lee rode up at the head of a column of infantry. He halted the men on the eastern side of the river to stop their progress along the line of our subsequent march towards Appomattox. (General Lee looked as he always did, and showed no sign of any discomfiture whatever. The fight near Farmville. We were now about a quarter of a mile from Farmville, and we marched about a mile farther on the road to Appomattox. I now saw a section of artillery—that is, two guns of the Second Rockbri
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.32 (search)
the Southern sympathizers. The bold dash of the Federals, under General McClellan, into Northwest Virginia, led to the assembling of a mighty army under General Robert E. Lee in Greenbrier and Pocahontas counties the summer of 1861, but General Lee and General Mc-Clellan never confronted each other in Western Virginia as commanders of opposing armies. General Lee did not reach Huntersville until the 3d day of August, 1861 (see Recollections and Letters of R. E. Lee, by Robert E. Lee, Jr., page 38, and did not reach his headquarters at Valley Mountain until three days later (see same book). General McClellan at this time was in command of the Army of tRobert E. Lee, Jr., page 38, and did not reach his headquarters at Valley Mountain until three days later (see same book). General McClellan at this time was in command of the Army of the Potomac, which he assumed on the 27th day of July (see History of the War of Rebellion, referred to, page 428); when General McClellan issues his first order as commanderinchief of that army. The great battle of Bull Run, or First Manassas, had been fought on the 21st day of July 1861, and the Confederates had gained a signa
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.36 (search)
e bridge on the Cashtown and Gettysburg Turnpike, within cannon shot of the battle-field. Here General Pickett sent Col. Walter Harrison, of his staff, to tell General Lee of our arrival and readiness for action. The Post of honor, July Ist. The answer came to find a camp and await further orders. Before dawn the following march being carefully concealed from the enemy's view. Soon after we got into position, some two hundred yards in the rear of the batteries on Seminary Ridge, General Lee passed in front of us, coming from the right, and a little while afterwards every man in the ranks was made to know exactly what was the work which had been cut chief of artillery. He had ridden out on the skirmish line to get a closer observation of the enemy's position, when a courier galloped up with a message from General Lee. Naturally he supposed Mars Robert wished to ask him what he had seen of those people that was worth reporting; but he was woefully mistaken. This was all the
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.37 (search)
but a loved name and a cherished memory. As Lee is among the few who from defeat and disaster hce in military rank. These men continued to be Lee's men after they had ceased to be Lee's soldierndsons, the daughters and the granddaughters of Lee's men and Lee's women have continued the advance bloody banners of battle waved in the spring, Lee's people were at work. The feet that had trampg and joyous emulation, the spreading spirit of Lee's heroism and patience, purity and splendid pure anywhere within this union. As a spirit of Lee lives, so the spirit and the underlying instinche North and the West. Their acceptance now of Lee as the supreme—the sublime, the ideal and the ps after Lee's surrender, thirty-six years after Lee's death they have become Lee's people. Was eve of your own matchless orator, Benjamin Hill to Lee, most appropriate now for quotation at the honoring of Lee's hundredth birthday: He was a foe without hate, a friend without treachery, a soldi[21 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.38 (search)
zens were hurried to the trenches. Dahlgren's original purpose was to cross the James River at either Jude's ferry, on the Morson place, or at Manakin ferry, three miles below, and to approach Richmond by the south bank of the James. Reaching Belle Isle, he proposed to liberate the 12,000 Federal prisoners encamped thereon, who, reinforced with his regiment, could easily sack the Confederate capital, as Richmond was then in an almost defenseless condition, the reserves having been sent to Lee at the front. There was found upon Dahlgren's body a memorandum, in which the young man had made a wager that he would hang Jeff Davis and his cabinet on that raid. But the fates were against him, as he was repulsed that evening in a desperate charge on the fortifications and later killed. He was ignorant of the depth of water at the ferry crossings, and therefore paid a burly, black negro man from the Stanard place, who professed safe knowledge of the ferry, $10 to pilot the troop of ca
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index. (search)
His Life incense to heaven, 55. Keith, Judge, James, Address of, 212. Kelly, General B. F., 289. Kemper, General J. L at Gettysburg, 323. Kilpatrick, General, Judson, 180. Lackland, Colonel, 366. Lacy, Chaplain B. T., 6. Lamb, Hon., John, Address of, 57. Lampkin's Battery, Retreat of from Petersburg to Appomattox, 243 Last Confederate and Federal soldier, respectively, killed, 218. Lee's Rangers, A noted (company, 179, 277. Lee, General Fitzhugh 11, 12, 20,. Lee, general R. E., statement of as to Chancellorsville, 8, 9, 14, 55; Worsley's lines on, 63; Last order of to Army of Northern Virginia, 110; commanded in West Virginia, 121, 245, 292; Abiding spirit of, 350, 387; Tribute to by B. H. Hill, 356. Lee, Captain, Wm. Fitzhugh, 364. Lee, General W. H. F., Rooney, 179, 192. Lee, General W. R., 273. Lemmon, George, 170. Lincoln, Mrs. A. 37. Lincoln, Proclamation, War, 281; Emancipation, 311. Lipscomb, Captain, Martin Meredith, 187. Long, General
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