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M. Tullius Cicero, Orations, for his house, Plancius, Sextius, Coelius, Milo, Ligarius, etc. (ed. C. D. Yonge) 10 0 Browse Search
Isocrates, Speeches (ed. George Norlin) 10 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Arthur Golding) 10 0 Browse Search
Q. Horatius Flaccus (Horace), Odes (ed. John Conington) 8 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More) 8 0 Browse Search
Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War 8 0 Browse Search
Xenophon, Cyropaedia (ed. Walter Miller) 8 0 Browse Search
E. T. Merrill, Commentary on Catullus (ed. E. T. Merrill) 8 0 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 6 0 Browse Search
Lysias, Speeches 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Pausanias, Description of Greece. You can also browse the collection for Cyprus (Cyprus) or search for Cyprus (Cyprus) in all documents.

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Pausanias, Description of Greece, Boeotia, chapter 41 (search)
d them, that Hephaestus made many works of art, but none is authentic except only the scepter of Agamemnon. However, the Lycians in Patara show a bronze bowl in their temple of Apollo, saying that Telephus dedicated it and Hephaestus made it, apparently in ignorance of the fact that the first to melt bronze were the Samians Theodorus and Rhoecus. The Achaeans of Patrae assert indeed that Hephaestus made the chest brought by Eurypylus from Troy, but they do not actually exhibit it to view. In Cyprus is a city Amathus, in which is an old sanctuary of Adonis and Aphrodite. Here they say is dedicated a necklace given originally to Harmonia, but called the necklace of Eriphyle, because it was the bribe she took to betray her husband. It was dedicated at Delphi by the sons of Phegeus (how they got it I have already related in my history of Arcadia),See Paus. 8.24.10. but it was carried off by the tyrants of Phocis. However, I do not think that it is in the sanctuary of Adonis at Amathus. For
Pausanias, Description of Greece, Phocis and Ozolian Locri, chapter 12 (search)
aonians, and the Peleiae (Doves) at Dodona also gave oracles under the inspiration of a god, but they were not called by men Sibyls. To learn the date of Phaennis and to read her oracles ... for Phaennis was born when Antiochus was establishing his kingship immediately after the capture of Demetrius.281-280 B.C The Peleiades are said to have been born still earlier than Phemonoe, and to have been the first women to chant these verses:—Zeus was, Zeus is, Zeus shall be; O mighty Zeus.Earth sends up the harvest, therefore sing the praise of earth as Mother. It is said that the men who uttered oracles were Euclus of Cyprus, the Athenians Musaeus, son of Antiophemus, and Lycus, son of Pandion, and also Bacis, a Boeotian who was possessed by nymphs. I have read the oracles of all these except those of Lycus.These are the women and men who, down to the present day, are said to have been the mouthpiece by which a god prophesied. But time is long, and perhaps similar things may occur a
Pausanias, Description of Greece, Phocis and Ozolian Locri, chapter 24 (search)
, they say, the mother of Homer. But the Cyprians, who also claim Homer as their own, say that Themisto, one of their native women, was the mother of Homer, and that Euclus foretold the birth of Homer in the following verses:—And then in sea-girt Cyprus there will be a mighty singer,Whom Themisto, lady fair, shall bear in the fields, A man of renown, far from rich Salamis.Leaving Cyprus, tossed and wetted by the waves,The first and only poet to sing of the woes of spacious Greece,For ever shall Cyprus, tossed and wetted by the waves,The first and only poet to sing of the woes of spacious Greece,For ever shall he be deathless and ageless.These things I have heard, and I have read the oracles, but express no private opinion about either the age or date of Homer. In the temple has been built an altar of Poseidon, because Poseidon too possessed in part the most ancient oracle. There are also images of two Fates; but in place of the third Fate there stand by their side Zeus, Guide of Fate, and Apollo, Guide of Fate. Here you may behold the hearth on which the priest of Apollo killed Neoptolemus, the son o
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