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Isocrates, Speeches (ed. George Norlin) 12 0 Browse Search
Isocrates, Speeches (ed. George Norlin) 10 0 Browse Search
Plato, Hippias Major, Hippias Minor, Ion, Menexenus, Cleitophon, Timaeus, Critias, Minos, Epinomis 10 0 Browse Search
Homer, The Iliad (ed. Samuel Butler) 10 0 Browse Search
Pindar, Odes (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien) 6 0 Browse Search
Xenophon, Anabasis (ed. Carleton L. Brownson) 4 0 Browse Search
Xenophon, Minor Works (ed. E. C. Marchant, G. W. Bowersock, tr. Constitution of the Athenians.) 4 0 Browse Search
Plato, Alcibiades 1, Alcibiades 2, Hipparchus, Lovers, Theages, Charmides, Laches, Lysis 4 0 Browse Search
Xenophon, Minor Works (ed. E. C. Marchant, G. W. Bowersock, tr. Constitution of the Athenians.) 4 0 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Plato, Laws. You can also browse the collection for Lacedaemon (Greece) or search for Lacedaemon (Greece) in all documents.

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Plato, Laws, Book 2, section 660b (search)
CliniasIn Heaven's name, Stranger, do you believe that that is the way poetry is composed nowadays in other States? So far as my own observation goes, I know of no practices such as you describe except in my own country and in Lacedaemon; but I do know that novelties are always being introduced in dancing and all other forms of music, which changes due not to the laws, but to disorderly tastes and these are so far from being constantly uniform and stable—like the Egyptian ones you describe—that they are never for a moment unifo
Plato, Laws, Book 3, section 682e (search)
ttingly and justly, but in such a way that there ensued a vast number of cases of death, slaughter, and exile. So they, being again driven out, migrated by sea; and because DorieusWe do not hear of him elsewhere; and the account here is so vague that it is hard to say what events (or traditions) are alluded to. The usual story is that Dorian invaders drove out the Achaeans from S. Greece (about 900 B.C.) was the man who then banded together the exiles, they got the new name of “Dorians,” instead of “Achaeans.” But as to all the events that follow this, you Lacedaemonians relate them all fully in your traditions.MegillusQuite true.AthenianAnd now—as it were by divine direction—we have returned once more to the very point in our discourse on laws where we made our digression,Cp. Plat. Laws 638d. when we plunged into the subject of music and drinking-parties; and we can, so to speak, get a fresh grip upon the argument, now that it has reached this point,—the settlement of Laced
Plato, Laws, Book 3, section 683c (search)
in making this second attempt to investigate legislation, we shall listen to a discourse that is no worse and no shorter than that we have just been listening to, I for one would go a long way to hear it; indeed, this would seem quite a short day, although it is, as a matter of fact, close on midsummer.AthenianSo it seems that we must proceed with our enquiry.MegillusMost certainly.AthenianLet us, then, place ourselves in imagination at that epoch when Lacedaemon, together with Argos and Messene and the adjoining districts, had become completely subject,
Plato, Laws, Book 3, section 683d (search)
Megillus, to your forefathers. They determined next, according to the tradition, to divide their host into three parts, and to establish three States,—Argos, Messene and Lacedaemon.MegillusVery true.AthenianAnd Temenus became King of Argos, Cresphontes of Messene, and Proclus and Eurysthenes of Lacedaemon.MegillusOf course.AthenianAnd all the men of that time swore that they would assist these kings Megillus, to your forefathers. They determined next, according to the tradition, to divide their host into three parts, and to establish three States,—Argos, Messene and Lacedaemon.MegillusVery true.AthenianAnd Temenus became King of Argos, Cresphontes of Messene, and Proclus and Eurysthenes of Lacedaemon.MegillusOf course.AthenianAnd all the men of that time swore that they would assist these ki
Plato, Laws, Book 3, section 692b (search)
For if the matter had lain with Temenus and Cresphontes See Plat. Laws 683d. and the lawgivers of their day—whosoever those lawgivers really were,—even the portion of Aristodemusi.e., Lacedaemon: Aristodemus was father of Eurysthenes and Procles (cp. Plat. Laws 683d). could never have survived, for they were not fully expert in the art of legislation; otherwise they could hardly have deemed it sufficient to moderate by means of sworn pledges Cp. Plat. Laws 684a. a youthful soul endowed with power such as might develop into a tyranny; but now God has shown of what kind the government ought to have been then, and ought to be now, if it is to endure. That we should understand th
Plato, Laws, Book 3, section 692d (search)
AthenianThe way they repulsed the Persians, Clinias, was disgraceful. But when I say “disgraceful,” I do not imply that they did not win fine victories both by land and sea in those victorious campaigns: what I call “disgraceful” is this,—that, in the first place, one only of those three States defended Greece, while the other two were so basely corrupt that one of themMessene actually prevented Lacedaemon from assisting Greece by warring against her with all its might, and Argos, the other,—which stood first of the three in the days of the Dorian
Plato, Laws, Book 7, section 796b (search)
when we reach this point in our legislation—that the latter should impart these lessons gently, and the former receive them gratefully. Nor should we omit such mimic dances as are fitting for use by our choirs,—for instance, the sword-dance of the CuretesPriests of the Idaean Zeus. here in Crete, and that of the DioscoriCastor and Pollux. in Lacedaemon; and at Athens, too, our Virgin-LadyAthene. gladdened by the pastime of the dance deemed it not seemly to sport with empty han
Plato, Laws, Book 8, section 836b (search)
passions which have been the cause of countless woes both to individuals and to whole States,—how is one to guard against these, or what remedy can one apply so as to find a way of escape in all such cases from a danger such as this? It is extremely difficult, Clinias. For whereas, in regard to other matters not a few, Crete generally and Lacedaemon furnish us (and rightly) with no little assistance in the framing of laws which differ from those in common use,—in regard to the passions of sex (for we are alone by ourselv
Plato, Laws, Book 10, section 885c (search)
CliniasWhat, then, shall we do or say to such people?AthenianLet us listen first, my good sir, to what they, as I imagine, say mockingly, in their contempt for us.CliniasWhat is it?AthenianIn derision they would probably say this: “O Strangers of Athens, Lacedaemon and Crete, what you say is true. Some of us do not believe in gods at all; others of us believe in gods of the kinds you mention. So we claim now, as you claimed in the matter of laws
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