hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Andocides, Speeches 8 0 Browse Search
Isocrates, Speeches (ed. George Norlin) 6 0 Browse Search
Aristotle, Rhetoric (ed. J. H. Freese) 6 0 Browse Search
Aristotle, Eudemian Ethics 4 0 Browse Search
Andocides, Speeches 4 0 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, Orations, for Quintius, Sextus Roscius, Quintus Roscius, against Quintus Caecilius, and against Verres (ed. C. D. Yonge) 4 0 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Speeches 11-20 4 0 Browse Search
Isocrates, Speeches (ed. George Norlin) 4 0 Browse Search
Isocrates, Speeches (ed. George Norlin) 2 0 Browse Search
M. Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia (ed. Sir Edward Ridley) 2 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Polybius, Histories. You can also browse the collection for Syracuse (Italy) or search for Syracuse (Italy) in all documents.

Your search returned 62 results in 30 document sections:

1 2 3
Polybius, Histories, book 1, Shipwreck of the Roman Fleet (search)
Shipwreck of the Roman Fleet In complete ignorance of what had happened to his advanced squadron, the Consul, who had remained behind at Syracuse, after completing all he meant to do there, put to sea; and, after rounding Pachynus, was proceeding on his voyage to Lilybaeum. The appearance of the enemy was once more signalled to the Carthaginian admiral by his look-out men, and he at once put out to sea, with the view of engaging them as far as possible away from their comrades. Junius saw the Carthaginian fleet from a considerable distance, and observing their great numbers did not dare to engage them, and yet found it impossible to avoid them by flight because they were now too close. He therefore steered towards land, and anchored under a rocky and altogether dangerous part of the shore; for he judged it better to run all risks rather than allow his squadron, with all its men, to fall into the hands of the enemy. The Carthaginian admiral saw what he had done; and determined that it
Polybius, Histories, book 1, Hippo and Utica Join the Rebels (search)
Carthaginians, finding themselves hemmed in on every side, were compelled to have recourse to the help of the free states in alliance with them.A line of the text appears to have been lost, probably containing an allusion to Hiero. Now Hiero, of Syracuse, had during this war been all along exceedingly anxious to do everything which the Carthaginians asked him; and at this point of it was more forward to do so than ever, from a conviction that it was for his interest, with a view alike to his own sovereignty and to his friendship with Rome, that Carthage should not perish, and so leave the superior power to work its own will without resistance. Hiero of Syracuse. And his reasoning was entirely sound and prudent. It is never right to permit such a state of things; nor to help any one to build up so preponderating a power as to make resistance to it impossible, however just the cause. Friendly disposition of Rome. Not that the Romans themselves had failed to observe the obligations of th
Polybius, Histories, book 2, The First Achaean League (search)
vary between o(ma/rios and o(mo/rios. The latter form seems to mean "god of a common frontier." But an inscription found at Orchomenus gives the form a)ma/rios, which has been connected with h(ma/ra "day." and a place in which to hold their meetings and common councils. *zeu/s o(ma/rios or a)ma/rios.They then adopted the laws and customs of the Achaeans, and determined to conduct their constitution according to their principles; but finding themselves hampered by the tyranny of Dionysius of Syracuse, and also by the encroachment of the neighbouring barbarians, they were forced much against their will to abandon them. B. C. 405-367. Again, later on, when the Lacedaemonians met with their unexpected reverse at Leuctra, and the Thebans as unexpectedly claimed the hegemony in Greece, a feeling of uncertainty prevailed throughout the country, and especially among the Lacedaemonians and Thebans themselves, because the former refused to allow that they were beaten, the latter felt hardly cert
Polybius, Histories, book 3, Plan: Causes of Wars (search)
heir authority, and in acquiring a supremacy over the Iberians and Gauls besides, but also at last, after their conquest of Carthage, to their conceiving the idea of universal dominion. Along with this I shall introduce anotherSecond on Hiero of Syracuse. digression on the fall of Hiero of Syracuse. After these digressions will come the disturbances in5. The attempted partition of the dominions of Ptolemy Epiphanes, B. C. 204. Egypt; how, after the death of King Ptolemy, Antiochus and Philip ent Syracuse. digression on the fall of Hiero of Syracuse. After these digressions will come the disturbances in5. The attempted partition of the dominions of Ptolemy Epiphanes, B. C. 204. Egypt; how, after the death of King Ptolemy, Antiochus and Philip entered into a compact for the partition of the dominions of that monarch's infant son. I shall describe their treacherous dealings, Philip laying hands upon the islands of the Aegean, and Caria and Samos, Antiochus upon Coele-Syria and Phoenicia.
Polybius, Histories, book 5, Earthquake At Rhodes (search)
ly obliged for their acceptance of them. Hiero and Gelo. Hiero and Gelo, for instance, presented them with seventy-five talents of silver, part at once, and the rest at a very short interval, as a contribution towards the expenses of the gymnasium; gave them for religious purposes some silver cauldrons and their stands, and some water vessels; and in addition to this ten talents for their sacrifices, and ten more to attract new citizens: their intention being that the whole present should amount to a hundred talents.Polybius therefore reckons the value of the le/bhtes and u(dri/ai as five talents. Not only so, but they gave immunity from customs to Rhodian merchants coming to their ports; and presented them besides with fifty catapults of three cubits length. In spite too of these large gifts, they regarded themselves as under an obligation to the Rhodians; and accordingly erected statues in the Deigma or Mart of Rhodes, representing the community of Rhodes crowned by that of Syracuse.
Polybius, Histories, book 7, Hieronymus of Syracuse (search)
Hieronymus of Syracuse After the plot against Hieronymus, King of Syracuse, Hieronymus succeeded his grandfather Hiero II. in B. C. 216. Under the influence of his uncles, Zoippus and Andranodorus, members of the Council of 15 established by Hiero, Syracuse, Hieronymus succeeded his grandfather Hiero II. in B. C. 216. Under the influence of his uncles, Zoippus and Andranodorus, members of the Council of 15 established by Hiero, Hieronymus opens communications with Hannibal. Thraso having departed, Zoippus and Andranodorus persuaded Hieronymus to lose no time in sending ambassadors to Hannibal. He accordingly selected Polycleitus of Cyrene and Philodemus of Argos for the pur some time serving in Hannibal's army, being domiciled at Carthage, owing to their grandfather having been banished from Syracuse because he was believed to have assassinated Agatharchus, one of the sons of Agathocles. On the arrival of these commissioners at Syracuse, Polycleitus and his colleague reported the result of their embassy, and the Carthaginian Commissioners sent to Carthage to formulate a treaty of alliance. delivered the message given by Hannibal: whereupon the king without hesitat
Polybius, Histories, book 7, Hieronymus of Syracuse (search)
Hieronymus of Syracuse Meanwhile intelligence of this transaction had reached The Roman praetor sends to remonstrate. scene with the king. the Roman praetor at Lilybaeum, who immediately despatched legates to Hieronymus, to renew the treaty which had been made with his ancestors. Being thoroughly annoyed with this embassy, Hieronymus said that "He was sorry for the Romans that they had come to such utter and shameful griefkakoi/ kakw=s, a phrase at once insulting and vulgar. in the battles in Ibout that before his grandfather's death a squadron of fifty Roman ships had sailed as far as Pachynus and then gone back again." The fact was that a short time ago the Romans had heard that Hiero was dead; and being much alarmed lest people in Syracuse, despising the youth of the grandson whom he left, should stir up a revolution, they had made this cruise with the intention of being ready there to assist his youthful weakness, and to help in maintaining his authority; but being informed that
Polybius, Histories, book 7, Description of Leontini (search)
Description of Leontini The city of Leontini taken as a whole faces north, Description of Leontini, where Hieronymus was murdered. See Livy, 24.7. and is divided in half by a valley of level ground, in which are the state buildings, the courthouses, and market-place. Along each side of this valley run hills with steep banks all the way; the flat tops of which, reached after crossing their brows, are covered with houses and temples. The city has two gates, one on the southern extremity of this valley leading to Syracuse, the other at the northern leading on to the "Leontine plains," and the arable district. Close under the westernmost of the steep cliffs runs a river called Lissus; parallel to which are built continuous rows of houses, in great numbers, close under the cliff, between which and the river runs the road I have mentioned. . . .
Polybius, Histories, book 7, Fall of Heronymus (search)
Fall of Heronymus Some of the historians who have described the fall of Fall of Hieronymus, B. C. 214. Hieronymus have written at great length and in terms of mysterious solemnity. They tell us of prodigies preceding his coming to the throne, and of the misfortunes of Syracuse. They describe in dramatic language the cruelty of his character and the impiety of his actions; and crown all with the sudden and terrible nature of the circumstances attending his fall. One would think from their description that neither Phalaris, nor Apollodorus, nor any other tyrant was ever fiercer than he. Yet he was a mere boy when he succeeded to power, and only lived thirteen months after. In this space of time it is possible that one or two men may have been put to the rack, or certain of his friends, or other Syracusan citizens, put to death; but it is improbable that his tyranny could have been extravagantly wicked, or his impiety outrageous. It must be confessed that he was reckless and unscrupulous
Polybius, Histories, book 7, Character of Hiero II (search)
Character of Hiero II For, in the first place, Hiero gained the sovereignty of Character of Hiero II., King of Syracuse, from B. C. 269 to B. C. 215. Syracuse and her allies by his own unaided abilities without inheriting wealth, or reputation, or any other advantage of fortune. And, in the second place, was established king of SSyracuse and her allies by his own unaided abilities without inheriting wealth, or reputation, or any other advantage of fortune. And, in the second place, was established king of Syracuse without putting to death, banishing, or harassing any one of the citizens,—which is the most astonishing circumstance of all. And what is quite as surprising as the innocence of his acquisition of power is the fact that it did not change his character. For during a reign of fifty-four years he preserved peace for the countSyracuse without putting to death, banishing, or harassing any one of the citizens,—which is the most astonishing circumstance of all. And what is quite as surprising as the innocence of his acquisition of power is the fact that it did not change his character. For during a reign of fifty-four years he preserved peace for the country, maintained his own power free from all hostile plots, and entirely escaped the envy which generally follows greatness; for though he tried on several occasions to lay down his power, he was prevented by the common remonstrances of the citizens. And having shown himself most beneficent to the Greeks, and most anxious to earn th
1 2 3