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M. Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia (ed. Sir Edward Ridley) 8 0 Browse Search
Q. Horatius Flaccus (Horace), Odes (ed. John Conington) 8 0 Browse Search
Q. Horatius Flaccus (Horace), The Works of Horace (ed. C. Smart, Theodore Alois Buckley) 8 0 Browse Search
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, The Lives of the Caesars (ed. Alexander Thomson) 6 0 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), History of Rome, books 1-10 (ed. Rev. Canon Roberts) 4 0 Browse Search
Vitruvius Pollio, The Ten Books on Architecture (ed. Morris Hicky Morgan) 4 0 Browse Search
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, The Lives of the Caesars (ed. Alexander Thomson) 4 0 Browse Search
Sextus Propertius, Elegies (ed. Vincent Katz) 4 0 Browse Search
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, The Lives of the Caesars (ed. Alexander Thomson) 4 0 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in John Conington, Commentary on Vergil's Aeneid, Volume 2. You can also browse the collection for Tiber (Italy) or search for Tiber (Italy) in all documents.

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John Conington, Commentary on Vergil's Aeneid, Volume 2, P. VERGILI MARONIS, line 61 (search)
It is not clear whether victor is used in reference to supera, or whether it is to be taken in its ordinary sense, the Tiber bidding Aeneas wait till he is a conqueror before paying dues to himself, and thus prophesying him victory.
John Conington, Commentary on Vergil's Aeneid, Volume 2, P. VERGILI MARONIS, line 62 (search)
Wagn. and Forb. contend that the construction is not ego sum Thybris, which they think would be weak, but ego sum, it is I that speak, the rest being added in apposition. But it is difficult to see where the weakness would be shown, and the ordinary interpretation seems the natural way in which a stranger would announce himself, though in 10. 230 a comma is rightly placed after nos sumus, the meaning being It is we, your old friends. Pleno flumine is of course an honourable attribute of a river, like pinguia culta secantem, with which last comp. the description of Eridanus G. 4. 272, and that of Tiber himself A. 2. 781.
John Conington, Commentary on Vergil's Aeneid, Volume 2, P. VERGILI MARONIS, line 64 (search)
Caeruleus is the common epithet of sea and river gods, G. 4. 388. So glauco amictu v. 33. The actual colour of the Tiber is flavus, 7. 81 &c.
John Conington, Commentary on Vergil's Aeneid, Volume 2, P. VERGILI MARONIS, line 65 (search)
ith domus, and caput exit urbibus would not be natural in the sense supposed. Perhaps we may combine the two views, taking magna domus with Wagn. and others of the Tiber's palace under the water (comp. G. 4. 363 &c. of the home of Cyrene in the bed of the Peneus), which is said to rise or emerge by a blending of the two notions of usion being to Rome. It seems probable from G. 4. l. c. that the palace of the river-nymphs is supposed to extend to a considerable length under the stream, and so Tiber here may speak of his home as extending to the place where Rome was after wards built. A place called Tiberina atria, of which Virg. may perhaps be thinking here, ith caput urbibus comp. caput populis 10. 203, caput amnibus Lucr. 5.270. The ambiguity is increased by our ignorance of the exact spot where Aeneas is supposed to see the Tiber, and by the fact that exit and caput are used in more senses than one in connexion with rivers, denoting both the source and the mouth: see on G. 4. 319.
John Conington, Commentary on Vergil's Aeneid, Volume 2, P. VERGILI MARONIS, line 66-80 (search)
Aeneas, awaking, prays to the Tiber, promising to worship him constantly in the event of success. He then prepares for his voyage.
John Conington, Commentary on Vergil's Aeneid, Volume 2, P. VERGILI MARONIS, line 66 (search)
Lacu alto, the deep of the river where he dwelt. We should naturally take it of the source (comp. v. 74 and see on G. 4. 364): but this cannot be intended here, being obviously inconsistent with the topography and with Aeneas' words in vv. 74, 5, which show that he does not know where the Tiber rises.
John Conington, Commentary on Vergil's Aeneid, Volume 2, P. VERGILI MARONIS, line 72 (search)
Genitor i. q. pater as an epithet of reverence. Macrob. Sat. 6. 1, says the line is from Ennius (A. 1. fr. 37) Teque pater Tiberine tuo cum flumine sancto. See on G. 2. 147, and Munro on Lucr. 1.413., 4. 394. Aeneas' prayer strongly resembles that of Cocles to the Tiber, Livy 2. 10, Tiberine pater, te sancte precor haec arma et hunc militem propitio flumine accipias. Serv. quotes a form of prayer, Adesto, Tiberine, cum tuis undis.
John Conington, Commentary on Vergil's Aeneid, Volume 2, P. VERGILI MARONIS, line 75 (search)
Rom. and fragm. Vat. have tenent: but, as Wagn. says, lacus in the plural does not accord with fonte. Flumine pulchro of the Tiber 7. 430.
John Conington, Commentary on Vergil's Aeneid, Volume 2, P. VERGILI MARONIS, line 77 (search)
For corniger see on G. 4. 371; for Hesperidum regnator aquarum comp. G. 1. 482, Fluviorum rex Eridanus. The Eridanus deserves the epithet more for its physical, the Tiber for its historical greatness. Here again Virg. seems to have followed Ennius (A. 1. fr. 48), Postquam consistit fluvius qui est omnibu' princeps, quoted by Fronto Epist. de Orat. p. 129 Niebuhr in connexion with a saying of M. Aurelius, Tiber amnis et dominus et fluentium circa regnator undarum. Germ. comp. Dionys. Perieg. 3 to have followed Ennius (A. 1. fr. 48), Postquam consistit fluvius qui est omnibu' princeps, quoted by Fronto Epist. de Orat. p. 129 Niebuhr in connexion with a saying of M. Aurelius, Tiber amnis et dominus et fluentium circa regnator undarum. Germ. comp. Dionys. Perieg. 351, *qu/mbris e)u+rrei/ths potamw=n basileu/tatos a)/llwn. Fluvius may be nom. for voc.; but it is at least as probable that the line is to be taken closely with celebrabere, the Tiber being celebrated as the king of rivers.
John Conington, Commentary on Vergil's Aeneid, Volume 2, P. VERGILI MARONIS, line 90 (search)
Rumore secundo is rightly taken by Cerda to mean the cheering of the crews. Comp. 10. 266, fugiuntque (grues) notos clamore secundo, 5. 338, plausuque volat fremituque secundo, and a fragment from an old tragedy (inc. inc. fr. 46 Ribbeck), Solvere imperat secundo rumore adversaque avi. Secundo rumore, adverso rumore are phrases used to signify general approbation and the contrary. See the commentators on Hor. 1 Ep. 10. 9. Heyne, fancying with Donatus that rumor meant the noise of the waters, connected rumore secundo with what follows. An absurd reading Rumone (the old name of the Tiber) is mentioned by Serv. with approbation, and has found its way into some MSS. and even into Med. a m. p.: but even if Virg. were likely to have introduced the name, secundo would contradict v. 58. Rom. and others, including quotations in Non. and Macrob, have peragunt for celerant, from 6. 384, and Pierius' Medicean has celebrant: see on 4. 641., 5. 609. Canon. gives celebrant clamore.
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