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Browsing named entities in a specific section of M. Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia (ed. Sir Edward Ridley). Search the whole document.

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Alban (Wisconsin, United States) (search for this): book 1, card 523
; in darkest nights Strange constellations sparkled through the gloom: The pole was all afire, and torches flew Across the depths of heaven; with horrid hair A blazing comet stretched from east to west And threatened change to kingdoms. From the blue Pale lightning flashed, and in the murky air The fire took divers shapes; a lance afar Would seem to quiver or a misty torch; A noiseless thunderbolt from cloudless sky Rushed down, and drawing fire in northern parts Plunged on the summit of the Alban mount. The stars that run their courses in the void Of night, came forth at noontide, and the moon Whose orb complete gave back her brother's rays, Hid by the shade of earth, grew pale and wan. The sun himself, when poised in mid career, Shrouded his burning car in blackest gloom And plunged the world in darkness, so that men Despaired of day-like as he veiled his light From that fell banquetCompare Ben Jonson's ' Catiline,' I. 1: Lecca. The day goes back, Or else my senses. Cirius. As at At
Tarquinii (Italy) (search for this): book 1, card 523
fibre hid, and through the vital parts The membrane small; the heart has ceased to throb; Blood oozes through the ducts; the caul is split: And, fatal omen of impending ill, One lobe o'ergrows the other; of the twain The one lies flat and sick, the other beats And keeps the pulse in rapid strokes astir. Disaster's near approach thus learned, he cries- ' Whatever may be the purpose of the gods, ' Tis not for me to tell; this offered beast ' Not Jove possesses, but the gods below. ' We dare not speak our fears, yet fear doth make ' The future worse than fact. May all the gods ' Prosper the tokens, and the sacrifice ' Be void of truth, and Tages (famous seer) Tages. A dwarf, with the figure of a child, but with grey hairs, ploughed up by a peasant near Tarquinii. He betrayed the secrets of Etruscan lore and straightway died. (Mommsen, vol. i. p. 190; Dennis, 'Cities and Cemeteries of Etruria,' vol. i. p. 373.) ' Have vainly taught these mysteries.' Such his words Involved, mysterious.
Vestal (New York, United States) (search for this): book 1, card 523
kest gloom And plunged the world in darkness, so that men Despaired of day-like as he veiled his light From that fell banquetCompare Ben Jonson's ' Catiline,' I. 1: Lecca. The day goes back, Or else my senses. Cirius. As at Atreus' feast. which Mycenae saw. The jaws of Etna were agape with flame That rose not heavenwards, but headlong fell In smoking stream upon th' Italian flank. Then black Charybdis, from her boundless depth, Threw up a gory sea. In piteous tones Howled the wild dogs; the Vestal fire was snatched From off the altar; and the flame that crowned The Latin festival was split in twain, As on the Theban pyre,When the Theban brothers, Eteocles and Polynices, were being burned on the same pyre, the flame shot up in two separate tongues, indicating that even in death they could not be reconciled. (Mr. Haskins' note, citing Statius, 'Theb.') in ancient days; Earth tottered on its base: the mighty Alps From off their summits shook th' eternal snow.'Shook the old snow from off
Mycenae (New York, United States) (search for this): book 1, card 523
t run their courses in the void Of night, came forth at noontide, and the moon Whose orb complete gave back her brother's rays, Hid by the shade of earth, grew pale and wan. The sun himself, when poised in mid career, Shrouded his burning car in blackest gloom And plunged the world in darkness, so that men Despaired of day-like as he veiled his light From that fell banquetCompare Ben Jonson's ' Catiline,' I. 1: Lecca. The day goes back, Or else my senses. Cirius. As at Atreus' feast. which Mycenae saw. The jaws of Etna were agape with flame That rose not heavenwards, but headlong fell In smoking stream upon th' Italian flank. Then black Charybdis, from her boundless depth, Threw up a gory sea. In piteous tones Howled the wild dogs; the Vestal fire was snatched From off the altar; and the flame that crowned The Latin festival was split in twain, As on the Theban pyre,When the Theban brothers, Eteocles and Polynices, were being burned on the same pyre, the flame shot up in two separate
s of yore, The Tuscan sages to the nation's aid. Aruns, the eldest, leaving his abode In desolate Luca,It would seem that Luna is the better reading. (Dante, ' Inferno,'xx. 46. came, well versed in all The lore of omens; knowing what may mean The flight of hovering bird, the pulse that beats In offered victims, and the levin bolt. All monsters first, by most unnatural birth Brought into being, in accursed flames He bids consume. Then round the walls of RomeSuch a ceremonial took place in A.D. 56 under Nero, after the temples of Jupiter and Minerva had been struck by lightning, and was probably witnessed by Lucan himself. (See Merivale's 'History of the Roman Empire,' chapter lii.) Each trembling citizen in turn proceeds. The priests, chief guardians of the public faith, With holy sprinkling purge the open space That borders on the wall; in sacred garb Follows the lesser crowd: the Vestals come By priestess led with laurel crown bedecked, To whom alone is given the right to see Minerva
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