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Browsing named entities in Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome. You can also browse the collection for 179 BC or search for 179 BC in all documents.

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Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, MARS, ARA (search)
regiae of Numa (Fest. 189: secunda spolia in Martis ara in campo solitaurilia utra voluerit caedito ?). Its erection belonged undoubtedly to the early regal period. In 193 B.C. a porticus was built from the PORTA FONTINALIS (q.v.) to this altar (Liv. xxxv. 10. 12: alteram (porticum) a porta Fontinali ad Martis aram qua in campum iter esset perduxerunt), and it was customary for the censors to place their curule chairs near it after the elections (Liv. xl. 45. 8 (179 B.C.): comitiis confectis ut traditum antiquitus est censores in campo ad aram Martis sellis curulibus consederunt). These are the only passages in which the ara is expressly mentioned, and indicate a site not too far from the porta Fontinalis-probably on the north-east side of the Capitoline hill-to be reached by a porticus of that early date, and relatively near the place of holding the comitia (OVILE, q.v.). Two other passages mention a templum or nao/s of Mars in the campus Martius (not tha
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, NAVALIA (search)
e been proposed. Hulsen places them below the narrowest part of the river, in the neighbourhood of the Palazzo Farnese (HJ 485-486). If the reference to Rome were certain, the earliest mention of them would be in a line of Ennius (ap. Serv. ad Aen. xi. 326: idem campus habet textrinum navibus longis); but they were in any case in existence in 167 B.C. (Liv. xlv. 35. 3; 42. 12: naves regiae ... in campo Martio subductae sunt; cf. Polyb. xxxvi. 5 [3], 9). But the fact that we are told that in 179 B.C. M. Fuluius locavit ... porticum extra portam Trigeminam, et aliam post navalia [et] ad fanum Herculis, et post Spei a Tiberi ad aedem Apollinis Medici (Liv. xl. 51) has led Hulsen (DAP 2. vi. 246-254) to argue that, as the porticus post navalia [et] ad fanum Herculis-the argument seems to apply whether we omit the et of the MSS. or not-must be intermediate between the other two porticus, those extra portam Trigeminam and post Spei, we have an indication of the existence of other earlier Nav
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, PONS AEMILIUS (search)
t. app.; Pol. Silv. 545; Hist. Aug. Elag. 17) of the first stone bridge across the Tiber, said to have been built ,u(p) *ai)mili/ou tamieu/ontos (Plut. Numa 9). A comparison of the citations just made with other passages (Ov. Fast. vi. 477-478; Serv. Aen. viii. 646; Aethicus, Cosmog. 28 (ed. Riese 83) ) indicates that this bridge was close to the pons Sublicius and crossed the river from the forum Boarium (cf. CIL i². p. 325). According to Livy (xl. 51. 4) M. Fulvius Nobilior when censor in 179 B.C. contracted (undoubtedly with his colleague M. Aemilius Lepidus) for the placing of 'pilas pontis in Tiberi,' and P. Scipio Africanus and L. Minucius, the censors of 142 B.C., built arches (fornices) on these piers. This statement is now generally believed to refer to the pons Aemilius, and Plutarch's attribution of the building of the bridge to a quaestor, Aemilius, is interpreted as a mistake or on the hypothesis that the fornices of 142 were of wood and that the stone arches were laid by
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, PORTICUS AEMILIA (search)
us in 193 B.C. (Liv.xxxv. o1. 12), and restored in 174 by the censors Q. Fulvius Flaccus and A. Postumius Albinus (Liv. xli. 27. 8). Livy also says (ib.) of these censors-et extra eandem portam in Aventinum porticum silice straverunt et eo publico ab aede Veneris fecerunt, which seems to mean that they paved another porticus running from the porta Trigemina to the temple of VENUS OBSEQUENS (q.v.), on the slope of the Aventine, near the lower end of the circus Maximus. Five years earlier, in 179 B.C., the censor M. Fulvius Flaccus is said to have contracted for a porticus extra portam Trigeminam (Liv. xl. 51. 6). What connection these had with each other, or with the Aemilia, is unknown (HJ 173, 174; Merlin 251). ' For remains attributed to this building, see EMPORIUM. (b) A porta Fontinali ad Martis aram (Liv. xxxv. io. 12) built at the same time as (a). Its exact location depends upon that of the PORTA FONTINALIS (q.v.) and of the ARA MARTIS (q.v.), and in any case would not be far no
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, PORTICUS POST NAVALIA (search)
PORTICUS POST NAVALIA built in 179 B.C. by the censor M. Fulvius Nobilior (Liv. xl. 51. 6; HJ 143), at the same time as the porticus extra portam Trigeminam and the porticus post Spei, behind the older NAVALIA (q.v.).
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, PORTICUS POST SPEI (search)
PORTICUS POST SPEI believed to have been built in 179 B.C. by the censor M. Fulvius Nobilior, at the same time as the porticus extra portam Trigeminam and the porticus post Navalia (Liv. xl. 51. 6; HJ 509). It would have extended from the Tiber to the temple of APOLLO MEDICUS (q.v.), probably across the area afterwards occupied by the theatre of Marcellus; but its very existence depends on an alteration of the reading in the passage cited above (see also NAVALIA).
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, SPES, AEDES (search)
in 218 B.C. (Liv. xxi. 62. 4), burned in 213 and restored the following year by a special commission (Liv. xxv. 7. 6; cf. xxiv. 47. 15-16), and burned again in 31 (Cass. Dio 1. 10. 3:nao\s )*elpi/dos). Germanicus dedicated the temple in 17 A.D. (Tac. Ann. ii. 49), necessarily after a restoration, but it is altogether improbable that Augustus failed to repair the damage of 31 B.C., and it is to him that Frank (who identifies it with the southern temple) attributes the existing structure. In 179 B.C. M. Fulvius built a porticus post Spei a Tiberi ad aedem APOLLINIS MEDICI (q.v.)-so the editors: Frank prefers the MS. reading post Spei ad Tiberim, i.e. the temple of Spes near the Tiber (Liv. xl. 5 . 6; cf. DAP 2. vi. 246). The day of dedication was Ist August (Fast. Arv. Vall. Ant. ap. NS 1921, 104, ad Kal. Aug., CIL i². p. 214, 240, 248, 323; Praen. NS 1897, 421; EE ix. 740). There is no further mention of this temple, but it is probably the middle and largest of the three of which the
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, Chronological Index to Dateable Monuments (search)
long it, 123. 188Statue of Marsyas set up (?), 499. 187Temple of Juno Regina vowed, 290. of Diana in Circus Flaminius vowed, 150. of Hercules Musarum, 255. 186of Ops struck by lightning and rebuilt in second half of century, 372. 184of Venus Erucina outside Porta Collina vowed, 551. Basilica Porcia built, 82. 181Temple of Pietas dedicated, 390. Books and Tomb of Numa found sub Janiculo, 3, 481. Temple of Venus Erucina dedicated, 551. 180Temple of Fortuna Equestris vowed, 215. 179Walls and columns of Capitoline Temple coated with stucco, 298. Statues taken away from Capitol, 49, 298. Temple of Diana in Circus Flaminius dedicated, 150. of Juno Regina in Circus Flaminius dedicated, 290. of Lares Permarini dedicated, 315. Basilica Aemilia begun, 72. Piers of Pons Aemilius built, 397. Macellum near Basilica Aemilia built, 322. Forum Piscarium incorporated in Macellum, 230. Porticus post Navalia, 359, 426; extra Portam Trigeminam, 359, 42
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