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Harrison's Island (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
ble round a camp-fire, little dreaming of the stirring events in which we were about to act a principal part. One company of the Thirteenth Mississippi had been detailed to picket the river on our left from Carter's Ferry to the head of Harrison's Island; one of the Seventeenth picketed to Edwards's Ferry on our right; horse pickets were on duty still lower down the river, watching the ferry,, where Goose Creek flows into the Potomac; another company of horse were watching Goose Creek bridgad not visited the woods around Ball's Bluff. It was a wild desolate place, and the guards disliked duty in the neighborhood. The Bluff so called was about thirty feet above the level of the river, and not more than one hundred yards from Harrison's Island, the level of which was some twenty-five feet lower than the Bluff. The island, however, was fringed with timber, and could conceal thousands of men. Little notice had been taken of this cheerless looking place, and few guards of either pa
James McCall (search for this): chapter 12
st, however; all the baggage had moved many miles to the rear, and we marched across Goose Creek bridge and along the Drainsville road to meet the enemy under General McCall. As the sun had not yet risen we approached the mouth of Goose Creek, crossed it, and passed near the guns of the enemy commanding these points without being bivouacked in the woods. Presently two of our mounted troopers came up with a Federal courier, who had been captured proceeding on his way with despatches from McCall to Stone. His papers betrayed little, yet sufficient to reveal that it was designed to draw us from Leesburgh along the Drainsville road, while Stone crossed-andoose Creek, where a South-Carolina regiment, a Louisiana regiment, and four guns of the Washington Artillery, reenforced us. Here we anxiously awaited battle from McCall, or any one else who dared to approach. Our reenforcements were eager for the strife, and could a hundred thousand dollars have purchased a battle, they would wi
flank we march out to the attack, Sunday, October twentieth capture of a Federal courier the ruse discovered plans of Stone, Baker, and Banks Countermarch to the Ferry road watching the river shell-firing by the enemy the enemy cross in forcnted troopers came up with a Federal courier, who had been captured proceeding on his way with despatches from McCall to Stone. His papers betrayed little, yet sufficient to reveal that it was designed to draw us from Leesburgh along the Drainsville road, while Stone crossed-and occupied the town. Evans was the very last man to be deceived by such a transparent trick, and as we marched back across the creek and halted in the woods along the Edwards's Ferry road, he drily observed, showing hd succeeded to the command in a luckless hour. Endeavoring to move by the left flank, in order to effect a junction with Stone at the Ferry, he was intercepted by our lieutenant-colonel, who advanced against him with six companies, and having surre
we march out to the attack, Sunday, October twentieth capture of a Federal courier the ruse discovered plans of Stone, Baker, and Banks Countermarch to the Ferry road watching the river shell-firing by the enemy the enemy cross in force at Banight, and at Edwards's Ferry, Goose Creek, and other Passages on Monday morning details of the battle of Leesburgh General Baker killed Colonel Coggswell, with eight hundred men taken prisoners great slaughter victory of the Confederate forcesd over one hundred killed or disabled; but though two thousand men — some of the very best in the Federal army, and under Baker — were opposed to them and kept up a semicircle of fire, our men held on like bloodhounds, and neither threats, commands, so much effect that the enemy's front and all around the guns were strewn with the dead and wounded in hundreds. General Baker having been killed shortly after our fierce onset, Colonel Coggswell now commanded the enemy, and thought to make goo
hout for either party, and did not stir out till victory had saluted our banners. The Yankees who had hid themselves along the bank of the river were 10th to come forth, but after much persuasion, they voluntarily came forward in a body, threw down their arms, and marched to town very good-humoredly, and, after being refreshed, were sent towards Manassas that same night. The quantities of arms we found along the banks surprised me — all being of English manufacture, having on the plates, Hall, London ; Bond, London; London Tower, etc. The stream at the crossing appeared to be literally choked with broken boats, dead bodies, and arms — not less than one hundred dead being piled up under the Bluffs in dozens, and scores in other places, and the sand all gory. The woods around the Bluffs were all cut down or splintered by shot, the trunks of the larger trees looking as if millions of rats had been gnawing them. The number of arms captured was near two thousand, four howitzers, muc
n Sunday night, and at Edwards's Ferry, Goose Creek, and other Passages on Monday morning details of the battle of Leesburgh General Baker killed Colonel Coggswell, with eight hundred men taken prisoners great slaughter victory of the Confederate forces retreat of the enemy to Maryland our reenforcements arrive. While our brigade was away from Leesburgh, and pickets were no longer at the river, many negroes crossed the stream, and informed the Yankees of our whereabouts. Several Unionists, also, had conferred with their friends, and every acre of the vicinity had been accurately mapped out by their engineers. We had long suspected old farmer Trunnell of treachery-his only son had joined the Northern army, and was a brigade commissary in it. It was to his knowledge of localities that the Yankees chiefly trusted when placing their batteries, and he had often been seen directing artillerists in their efforts to shell the town. His father was extremely wealthy, and had an ext
Elijah White (search for this): chapter 12
d escaped from. the hospitals, knocked over the doctors and parsons who tried to prevent them, and marched out to participate in the fight, and now fell into rank with great good humor! As many more had left the hospitals in the morning contrary to orders, and not knowing the whereabouts of their respective regiments, had directed their steps to the line of fire, and fought manfully. As we ran towards the scene of battle, the roar of the enemy's musketry and cannon was deafening. Lige White, who had been very active all day, rode up to us and confirmed the statement that our small force was nearly surrounded: he knew every inch of the ground perfectly, and piloted us into a position immediately in front of the enemy's centre. The enemy did not expect us in that direction, and a lull in the firing immediately ensued. Our fatigued comrades seemed with one accord to leave the battle entirely to as; and we did not disappoint their flattering expectations. Advancing through the w
oping upon the ground, and highly complimented us, saying that he had been anxiously watching us, at the same time observing the enemy's movements along the Edwards's Ferry road. If the truth must be told, he directed our movements from his office in town, two miles away — or between that point and Fort Evans--and was swearing lustily all the afternoon; yet, although he fondly expected the enemy to approach the fort, they did not do so; hence every disposition was made at Ball's Bluff by Colonel Burt, of the Eighteenth, who fell while cheering on the four right companies in their headlong massacre of the enemy. Another remarkable fact: when the Yankees had safely reached the shores of Maryland, they began to cheer like madmen, but for what, will ever remain a mystery. One of the boys dryly remarked, that the darned fools cheered because they got back safely! Others said, they cheered because they felt so mighty big over another victory! Both were probably near the truth! Our w
party, and did not stir out till victory had saluted our banners. The Yankees who had hid themselves along the bank of the river were 10th to come forth, but after much persuasion, they voluntarily came forward in a body, threw down their arms, and marched to town very good-humoredly, and, after being refreshed, were sent towards Manassas that same night. The quantities of arms we found along the banks surprised me — all being of English manufacture, having on the plates, Hall, London ; Bond, London; London Tower, etc. The stream at the crossing appeared to be literally choked with broken boats, dead bodies, and arms — not less than one hundred dead being piled up under the Bluffs in dozens, and scores in other places, and the sand all gory. The woods around the Bluffs were all cut down or splintered by shot, the trunks of the larger trees looking as if millions of rats had been gnawing them. The number of arms captured was near two thousand, four howitzers, much clothing, a f
Nathan Evans (search for this): chapter 12
d, two or three feet deep, as usual! The doubt was soon resolved. Evans and his staff were seen approaching through a dense mist, and our mto in lieu of breakfast. A courier came down the road and informed Evans that the enemy were six miles away, but had not stirred since six Pg the Drainsville road, while Stone crossed-and occupied the town. Evans was the very last man to be deceived by such a transparent trick, aof Fort Evans, and, finding the enemy were not inclined to advance, Evans determined to do so. Our orders were to attack the enemy, and makeand is still sufficiently remarkable to be worthy of note, that General Evans was not upon or even near the field until the last shot had bees. We waited until noon, and although the rain poured in torrents, Evans was anxious to entice them forward. The Thirteenth was ordered to es would move down from Drainsville, and cut off his communication, Evans once more fell back to Goose Creek, where a South-Carolina regiment
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