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The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The mistakes of Gettysburg. (search)
e directing brigade of support under General Wilcox, and was rendered hopeless by the failure of Ewell's Corps to co-operate, its line of battle having been broken through the advice of General Earlyto attack us, as he certainly intended doing; sixth, when I attacked the enemy's left on the 2d, Ewell should have moved at once against his right, and Hill should have threatened his centre, and thuo have won the day. The only amendment that would have ensued, or even promised victory, was for Ewell to have marched in upon the enemy's right when it was guarded by a single brigade, run over theidvanced to battle, or made to even threaten battle. The work was left entirely with my men. General Ewell dates his co-operative move at dusk. General Meade says it was at eight o'clock. In any evedifferent battle. It is equally out of sense to say that if my attack had been made at sunrise, Ewell would have given me the co-operation that he failed to give in the afternoon when the attack rea
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The First cavalry. (search)
General Lee slipped away from Hooker at Fredericksburg, en route for Gettysburg, and suddenly confronted Milroy at Winchester. The First New York Cavalry were at Berryville, and were compelled to retire before the advance of Rodes' Division, of Ewell's Corps. A brigade of rebel cavalry pursued and overtook them at the Opequan, but the First New York cleaned them out nicely, killing and wounding over fifty of them, and causing them to retire from the field. When Milroy found he was surroundelry led the charge. Again at Dinwiddie Court-House and Five Forks, the regiment won fresh laurels under the eyes of Sheridan and Custer. At Sailor's creek the First New York (Lincoln) Cavalry led the charge over the enemy's works, capturing General Ewell and his staff and hundreds of prisoners, beside guns and battle-flags. At Appomattox Station they charged with Custer, in the darkness, and took hundreds of prisoners, many guns and wagons, beside four trains of stores, which were waiting fo
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The career of General A. P. Hill. (search)
There it encountered General Jackson, who had been dispatched with Ewell's and Hill's divisions, and his own under General Taliaferro, to retreat for the north branch of the Rappahannock. Jackson, Hill, and Ewell were at once started in eager pursuit, striking for the upper fordshe onsets of a vast army. First, on the 27th, the attack fell upon Ewell, who had been left at Bristow Station. Finding from the constant pd soon appear, the game would grow desperate. But nobly did Hill, Ewell, and Taliaferro respond to the demands of their chief. First on one and then the other the unequal battle fell. Taliaferro and Ewell were wounded while gallantly encouraging their jaded troops to fresh effoed of the divisions of McLaws, Pickett, and Hood; the Second, under Ewell, comprised the divisions of Early, Rodes, and Johnson; while to Hilfollowed, casualty and the necessities of war called Longstreet and Ewell away from Lee, but Hill was ever at his side. Nor was the constanc
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), Stonewall Jackson's Valley campaign. (search)
hes, while good roads led from his rear to General Ewell. Thus, secure in his position, Jackson at could be spared to him beyond the commands of Ewell and of Edward Johnson, the latter of whom was sburg. This movement of McDowell had released Ewell and left him free to aid Jackson, who, with a that of Johnson, and falling upon Milroy while Ewell kept Banks in check. Then he would join Ewelln chief in Virginia, thought it time to recall Ewell to meet the new danger thus threatened, and thsses the Massanutten mountains to Luray, where Ewell joins him, and pours down the narrow Page Vallother part held the Front Royal road, on which Ewell, with a part of his division, was advancing. t will be to capture the forces of Jackson and Ewell, either in co-operation with General Fremont, s held in check by Ashby, supported by part of Ewell's Division. On Sunday McDowell, despairing ofe afternoon Fremont withdraws his whole line. Ewell's force was about six thousand and his loss tw[18 more...]
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