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David Watson (search for this): chapter 8
de fire from his artillery, would come into battle and give it cohesive power. I left Headquarters at three o'clock, and after an hour's repose rode to the front to find General Hill. Wilcox's brigade was on my right on the return front, Pryor's brigade on his left, and R. H. Anderson, Kemper, Colston, Armistead, and Mahone occupied the line between the Williamsburg road and the railroad. Pickett's brigade was ordered to be with General Hill at daylight, and Maurin's, Stribling's, and Watson's batteries, of Pickett's brigade, to take position on the right of Armistead's. I found General Hill before he had his breakfast, enjoying the comforts of Casey's camp. Pickett had passed and was in search of his position, which was soon disclosed by a fusillade from the front of Richardson's division. A party of bummers from Richmond had found their way into the camp at Fair Oaks, and were getting such things as they could put their hands on. They were taken in the gray of the mornin
O. B. Wilcox (search for this): chapter 8
adquarters at three o'clock, and after an hour's repose rode to the front to find General Hill. Wilcox's brigade was on my right on the return front, Pryor's brigade on his left, and R. H. Anderson, en Pines, but before the order reached the front the fight was renewed by Hooker's division upon Wilcox and Pryor, and reached out to our left near Fair Oaks. In the heat of this, General Wilcox receGeneral Wilcox received the order to retire, and in undue haste pulled his command out, assumed authority over Pryor, and ordered him off. Pickett, the true soldier, knowing that the order was not intended for such emerr his brigade, our line of skirmishers remaining near the enemy's during the day and night. General Wilcox reported of his battle, when he pulled off from it, that he was doing as well as he could wless. The failure of the enemy to push the opportunity made by the precipitate retreat of General Wilcox, and Pickett's successful resistance, told that there was nothing in the reports of troops c
James L. Kemper (search for this): chapter 8
point, and, upon having the enemy's line fully exposed, would find the field fine for his batteries, and put them in practice without orders from his commander, and, breaking the enemy's line by an enfilade fire from his artillery, would come into battle and give it cohesive power. I left Headquarters at three o'clock, and after an hour's repose rode to the front to find General Hill. Wilcox's brigade was on my right on the return front, Pryor's brigade on his left, and R. H. Anderson, Kemper, Colston, Armistead, and Mahone occupied the line between the Williamsburg road and the railroad. Pickett's brigade was ordered to be with General Hill at daylight, and Maurin's, Stribling's, and Watson's batteries, of Pickett's brigade, to take position on the right of Armistead's. I found General Hill before he had his breakfast, enjoying the comforts of Casey's camp. Pickett had passed and was in search of his position, which was soon disclosed by a fusillade from the front of Rich
David B. Birney (search for this): chapter 8
enemy's third intrenched line. Smith's part of the field was open and fine for artillery practice. The field fronting on the railroad was so shut in by heavy pine forest and tangled swamp that we had no place for a single gun. D. H. Hill's division was in reserve near the Casey encampment. The enemy stood: Sedgwick's division in front of Smith; Richardson's division in column of three brigades parallel to the railroad and behind it, prepared to attack my left; on Richardson's left was Birney's brigade behind the railroad, and under the enemy's third intrenched line were the balance of the Third and all of the Fourth Corps. So the plan to wheel on Smith's right as a pivot, my right stepping out on the wheel, would have left the Third and Fourth Corps to attack our rear as soon as we moved. Besides, it was evident that our new commander would do nothing, and we must look to accident for such aid as might be drawn to us during the battle. The plan proposed could only be co
William Mahone (search for this): chapter 8
my's line fully exposed, would find the field fine for his batteries, and put them in practice without orders from his commander, and, breaking the enemy's line by an enfilade fire from his artillery, would come into battle and give it cohesive power. I left Headquarters at three o'clock, and after an hour's repose rode to the front to find General Hill. Wilcox's brigade was on my right on the return front, Pryor's brigade on his left, and R. H. Anderson, Kemper, Colston, Armistead, and Mahone occupied the line between the Williamsburg road and the railroad. Pickett's brigade was ordered to be with General Hill at daylight, and Maurin's, Stribling's, and Watson's batteries, of Pickett's brigade, to take position on the right of Armistead's. I found General Hill before he had his breakfast, enjoying the comforts of Casey's camp. Pickett had passed and was in search of his position, which was soon disclosed by a fusillade from the front of Richardson's division. A party of b
J. Bankhead Magruder (search for this): chapter 8
to the York River Railroad, facing east, his right near Fair Oaks Station. Besides his division of ten thousand, he had Magruder's and other commands of fresh troops near him,--twenty thousand. My left lay near Smith's right, the line extending par aid as might be drawn to us during the battle. The plan proposed could only be considered under the hypothesis that Magruder would come in as the pivotal point, and, upon having the enemy's line fully exposed, would find the field fine for his bd's brigade, and Howard by Meagher's, and the firing extended along my line as far as the return front of my right. But Magruder was not on the field to seize the opportunity for his artillery. He was nowhere near the battle,--had not been called. mmander seemed to forget. At the same time he wrote me,--I have directed Whiting to take close defensive relations with Magruder. At any rate, that was absolutely necessary to enable a good defence to be made whilst you are pivoting on Whiting's po
Charles J. Whiting (search for this): chapter 8
for his artillery. He was nowhere near the battle,--had not been called. General Whiting, however, saw the opportunity so inviting, and reported to his commander a road and gave us some concern. Failing to receive approval of his chief, General Whiting reported at nine o'clock,--If I don't receive an answer in half an hour, Iew commander seemed to forget. At the same time he wrote me,--I have directed Whiting to take close defensive relations with Magruder. At any rate, that was absolutely necessary to enable a good defence to be made whilst you are pivoting on Whiting's position. Smith's War Papers. Whiting's position, instead of being pivotWhiting's position, instead of being pivotal, began its rearward move at the opening fire at daybreak, and continued in that line of conduct until it reached a point of quiet. General Smith was informed thale would be ours. But just then he held a council with Generals McLaws and Whiting and Chief Engineer Stevens, and submitted the question, Must the troops be wit
George E. Pickett (search for this): chapter 8
ngstreet's opposition to retiring severe fighting Pickett's brave stand General Lee assigned to command he ne between the Williamsburg road and the railroad. Pickett's brigade was ordered to be with General Hill at dd Maurin's, Stribling's, and Watson's batteries, of Pickett's brigade, to take position on the right of Armiste breakfast, enjoying the comforts of Casey's camp. Pickett had passed and was in search of his position, which assumed authority over Pryor, and ordered him off. Pickett, the true soldier, knowing that the order was not idiately after this repulse was a quiet advance upon Pickett's right. The commander asked, What troops are thesushy cover, which ended the battle of Seven Pines. Pickett was withdrawn to position assigned for his brigade,e by the precipitate retreat of General Wilcox, and Pickett's successful resistance, told that there was nothind were drawn back during the night, the rear-guard, Pickett's brigade, passing the Casey works at sunrise on th
Robert E. Lee (search for this): chapter 8
Longstreet's opposition to retiring severe fighting Pickett's brave stand General Lee assigned to command he orders the withdrawal of the army criticism of Gener artillery. The enemy are in full view and in heavy masses. I have ordered up Lee with four pieces. The musketry firing in advance is tremendous. Smith's War Pa no more consideration than the appeal made through General McLaws. Then General Lee, having been assigned to command, came upon the field after noon by the Ninel Smith, came over to the Williamsburg road. A similar proposition was made General Lee, but General Smith protested that the enemy was strongly fortified. At the es. General Holmes marched down the Williamsburg road and rested in wait for General Lee. Like General Huger, he held rank over me. General Lee ordered the troops bGeneral Lee ordered the troops back to their former lines. Those on the Williamsburg road were drawn back during the night, the rear-guard, Pickett's brigade, passing the Casey works at sunrise on
o find General Hill. Wilcox's brigade was on my right on the return front, Pryor's brigade on his left, and R. H. Anderson, Kemper, Colston, Armistead, and Mahone occupied the line between the Williamsburg road and the railroad. Pickett's brigade was ordered to be with General Hill at daylight, and Maurin's, Stribling's, and Watson's batteries, of Pickett's brigade, to take position on the right of Armistead's. I found General Hill before he had his breakfast, enjoying the comforts of Casey's camp. Pickett had passed and was in search of his position, which was soon disclosed by a fusillade from the front of Richardson's division. A party of bummers from Richmond had found their way into the camp at Fair Oaks, and were getting such things as they could put their hands on. They were taken in the gray of the morning for Confederate troops and fired upon. This made some confusion with our new troops, and part of them opened fire in the wrong direction, putting two or three bull
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