hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Col. Robert White, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.2, West Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 53 5 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 53 3 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 51 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 29 1 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 17 1 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 15 1 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 14 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: February 25, 1865., [Electronic resource] 14 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 11 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 11 3 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army .. You can also browse the collection for George Crook or search for George Crook in all documents.

Your search returned 124 results in 13 document sections:

1 2
y strong, was directed to await the arrival of Crook and for the rear division of the Fifth Corps; h lines north of Burkeville had been broken by Crook after the despatches were written, which woulds for estimating his troops, so I sent word to Crook to strike up the railroad toward me, and to Mettersville the evening of April 4, as did also Crook's and Merritt's cavalry, yet none of the army morning, to learn what he was up to I directed Crook to send Davies's brigade on a reconnoissance td running from Deatonsville to Rice's station, Crook leading and Merritt close up. Before long the emy's trains were discovered on this road, but Crook could make but little impression on them, theyto Farmville. This was prevented, however, by Crook forming his division, two brigades dismounted ight, went at him along with them, Merritt and Crook resuming the fight from their positions in fro immediate command were captured. Merritt and Crook had also broken up Anderson by this time, but [5 more...]
of the 7th we moved out at a very early hour, Crook's division marching toward Farmville in directnt of General Ord's troops at Rice's Station. Crook overtook the main body of the Confederates at prisoners, among them Gregg himself. When Crook sent word of this fight, it was clear that Leected everything on Appomattox depot, recalling Crook the night of the 7th to Prospect Station, whilay, April 8, Merritt and Mackenzie united with Crook at Prospect Station, and the cavalry all moved was put in on the right of Custer, and one of Crook's brigades was sent to our left and the other ellion would be ended on the morrow. Merritt, Crook, Custer, and Devin were present at frequent inke room for Ord, now in the woods to my rear. Crook, who with his own and Mackenzie's divisions wathe Confederates, who forthwith began to press Crook, their line of battle advancing with confidencneral Lee that some of his cavalry in front of Crook was violating the suspension of hostilities by[2 more...]
heir more advanced positions from behind stone walls and hedges, through valleys and hamlets, in the direction of Metz, but as yet the German right had accomplished little except to get possession of the village of Gravelotte, forcing the French across the deep ravine I have mentioned, which runs north and south a little distance east of the town. But it was now time for the German right to move in earnest to carry the Rozerieulles ridge, on which crest the French had evidently General George Crook. decided to make an obstinate fight to cover their withdrawal to Metz. As the Germans moved to the attack here, the French fire became heavy and destructive, so much so, indeed, as to cause General Von Steinmetz to order some cavalry belonging to the right wing to make a charge. Crossing the ravine before described, this body of horse swept up the slope beyond, the front ranks urged forward by the momentum from behind. The French were posted along a sunken road, behind stone walls
1 2