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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Stonewall Jackson in the Shenandoah. (search)
liaferro, William Gilham, and S. R. Anderson, Jackson moved against the Union communications along ting Jackson. As soon as information reached Jackson of what had been done, he indignantly resigne0 men. A little after the middle of March, Jackson concentrated what troops he could, and on thece to Staunton, to be followed by Fremont. Jackson had collected, from Charlottesville and othery's pursuing cavalry, led by Captain Sheetz. Jackson ordered him to pursue as vigorously as possib where he remained in blissful ignorance that Jackson had left McDowell, till he learned by telegraWe pursued them eight miles. I rode back with Jackson, and at sunset we were on the battle-field atcident are comprised in the following. General Jackson says in his report: While the forces soon after breakfast with a guide to call on Jackson at Swift Run Gap, near Port Republic, where hh was now no longer threatened by the enemy), Jackson moved all his troops south-east, and on the 2[52 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Notes on the battle of McDowell. (search)
Robert C. Schenck, Major-General U. S. V. On the 7th of May I left Franklin with about 2000 men to join and support General Milroy, menaced with attack by Stonewall Jackson, near McDowell, about forty miles distant. During this forced march my troops made the remarkable time of 34 miles in 23 hours. When I arrived, on the mornino Franklin, which occupied three days, was orderly and was not seriously molested by Ashby's cavalry or any force of the rebels in pursuit. At Franklin we kept Jackson with his whole force at bay with our still much inferior numbers, until General Fremont arrived there on the 13th of May. With the troops I had left behind at Frreport of General R. H. Milroy. May 7th I was first advised by my scouts and spies that a junction had been effected between the armies of Generals [Stonewall] Jackson and [Edward] Johnson, and that they were advancing to attack me at McDowell. Having the day previous sent out a large portion of the 3d West Virginia and 32d and
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., I. (search)
I.by Robert C. Schenck, Major-General U. S. V. On the 7th of May I left Franklin with about 2000 men to join and support General Milroy, menaced with attack by Stonewall Jackson, near McDowell, about forty miles distant. During this forced march my troops made the remarkable time of 34 miles in 23 hours. When I arrived, on the morning of the 8th, I found Milroy, with his small force in the village at the foot of the mountain, defending himself against the enemy occupying the heights above, and withdrew in good order toward Franklin in the early morning. Our march back to Franklin, which occupied three days, was orderly and was not seriously molested by Ashby's cavalry or any force of the rebels in pursuit. At Franklin we kept Jackson with his whole force at bay with our still much inferior numbers, until General Fremont arrived there on the 13th of May. With the troops I had left behind at Franklin, when I marched to the relief of Milroy, I had at no time before Fremont arr
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Ii.--extracts from the report of General R. H. Milroy. (search)
Ii.--extracts from the report of General R. H. Milroy. May 7th I was first advised by my scouts and spies that a junction had been effected between the armies of Generals [Stonewall] Jackson and [Edward] Johnson, and that they were advancing to attack me at McDowell. Having the day previous sent out a large portion of the 3d West Virginia and 32d and 75th Ohio Regiments to Shaw's Ridge and upon Shenandoah Mountain for the purpose of protecting my foraging and reconnoitering parties, I immediately ordered my whole command to concentrate at McDowell, and, expecting reenforcements, prepared for defense there. . . . Upon the next morning (the 8th instant) the enemy was seen upon the Bull Pasture Mountain, about one and three-fourths miles distant from McDowell, on my right and front. I commenced shelling them and sent out parties of skirmishers to endeavor to ascertain their numbers. At about 10 A. M. your brigade arrived. Desultory firing of a section of Hyman's battery and occa
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 6.38 (search)
Brigade loss: k, 5; w, 25; m, 2.94 = 324. unattached: 10th Me., Col. Geo. L. Beal; 8th N. Y. Car. (5 co's, dismounted), Lieut.-Col. Charles R. Babbitt; Pa. Zouaves d'afrique, Capt. Charles H. T. Collis; E, Pa. Art'y (section), Lieut. Charles A. Atwell. Unattached loss: k, 6; w, 17: m, 131 = 154. The total loss of Banks's troops at Front Royal, Middletown, Newtown, Winchester, etc., from May 23d to 25th, is reported as 62 killed, 243 wounded, and 1714 captured or missing = 2019. But Jackson claims ( Official Records, Vol. XII., Pt. I., p. 708) that the whole number of prisoners captured by his command was about 3050, including about 750 sick and wounded in the hospitals at Winchester and Strasburg. The effective strength of Banks's command was reported, April 30th, at 9178, and June 16th (after the battle) at 7113. Forces at Harper's Ferry, May 26th-30th, 1862. Brigadier-General Rufus Saxton. Brigade Commanders: Brig.-Gens. James Cooper and John P. Slough, and Col. Dix
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The Union Army. (search)
Brigade loss: k, 5; w, 25; m, 2.94 = 324. unattached: 10th Me., Col. Geo. L. Beal; 8th N. Y. Car. (5 co's, dismounted), Lieut.-Col. Charles R. Babbitt; Pa. Zouaves d'afrique, Capt. Charles H. T. Collis; E, Pa. Art'y (section), Lieut. Charles A. Atwell. Unattached loss: k, 6; w, 17: m, 131 = 154. The total loss of Banks's troops at Front Royal, Middletown, Newtown, Winchester, etc., from May 23d to 25th, is reported as 62 killed, 243 wounded, and 1714 captured or missing = 2019. But Jackson claims ( Official Records, Vol. XII., Pt. I., p. 708) that the whole number of prisoners captured by his command was about 3050, including about 750 sick and wounded in the hospitals at Winchester and Strasburg. The effective strength of Banks's command was reported, April 30th, at 9178, and June 16th (after the battle) at 7113. Forces at Harper's Ferry, May 26th-30th, 1862. Brigadier-General Rufus Saxton. Brigade Commanders: Brig.-Gens. James Cooper and John P. Slough, and Col. Dix
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Fighting Jackson at Kernstown. (search)
troops remaining under General Shields. Stonewall Jackson now returned, intent upon victory, the r then at D, whence he advanced to oppose Stonewall Jackson in his flanking position at F, to which t for the recognition of my services. Stonewall Jackson, although out of the valley, was still ioy at McDowell and checking Milroy's advance, Jackson again returned to our front. Both sides claivalley to Strasburg, thus opening the way for Jackson [see map, p. 284]. With Shields's division fadiers of Banks's division from the valley. Jackson made his attack at Front Royal on the 23d, an engagements at Port Republic and Cross Keys. Jackson, being hard pressed, prepared to save his armm the destruction that had threatened him. Jackson, on the morning of the 9th, with his army, atbrigade. Ferry came with our supports, but Jackson, having been severely handled by a small deta It was the intention, thus united, to follow Jackson, now retreating toward Gordonsville to join L[20 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Lee's attacks north of the Chickahominy. (search)
better fix the time for the attack to begin. Jackson replied: Daylight of the 26th. Longstreet thnterest to the student of history to know how Jackson managed to slip off so often and so easily. Federal right wing before Richmond: General Jackson's forced march from Mount Meridian, in thhe direction toward Cold Harbor, etc. General Jackson was unable to reach the point expected on. M. having arrived, and no intelligence from Jackson or Branch, I determined to cross at once, ratsion to take the Bethesda Church road to join Jackson. The works on that road were turned by my diroad by which the Confederate left under Stonewall Jackson and D. H. Hill advanced to attack Porterondition of the battle and of the roads, that Jackson posted my division in the woods to the left oquently learned that his story was true. General Jackson, having ridden some distance in advance, necessary to keep it up, without waiting for Jackson. The same necessity compelled Lee on the sec[25 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 7.47 (search)
nter of General Porter's position, his line having been completely cut in two, and thus rendered no longer tenable. From the flanks of the great gap where Whiting's division had torn through, the Federal lines gave way in both directions. R. H. Anderson's brigade, till then in reserve, passed through on the right, and led the way for Longstreet's division, while on the left the roll of musketry receded toward the Chickahominy, and the cheering of the victorious Confederates announced that Jackson, Ewell, and D. H. Hill were sweeping that part of the field. The battle was won; the Federal infantry was in full flight toward the swamps of the Chickahominy and the bridges in their rear, leaving a large portion of their artillery in the hands of the Confederates. But the fighting was not all over. Several Federal batteries, posted in reserve on the further side of the plateau which the Confederates had gained, opened a rapid but rather ineffective fire, with the view of covering the
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Rear-guard fighting during the change of base. (search)
completion. On the enemy's side, the slowness of Jackson in getting his force to the south side of the Chick June 29th. The 28th and 29th had been occupied by Jackson in disposing of the dead and wounded at Gaines's Mihe shot, which did small damage. It appears that Jackson, having left Savage's Station early in the morning,opment of our defense of the crossing convinced General Jackson that it would be impossible for him to force itreenforce him. No other movement was made by General Jackson's force during the day. Our artillery fired at vern Hill, long before that attack was made. General Jackson in his report intimates that his whole command,ttery was consequently recalled. General Lee says: Jackson having been unable to force the passage of White Oale. It must be evident to any military reader that Jackson ought to have known of the existence of Brackett's at we should have been defeated on that day had General Jackson done what his great reputation seems to make it
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