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Vera Cruz, Mo. (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
and gave timely aid to the Twenty-third and Twenty-seventh Massachusetts. with all this pressure of overwhelming numbers, the Confederates still held out. At length the artillery ammunition of the Nationals began to fail, and they were suffering very severely in killed and wounded. Victory could now be won only by a charge. That movement was resolved upon. Major E. A. Kimball, of Hawkins's (Ninth New York) Zouaves (a hero of the Mexican war, who fought gallantly in every battle, from Vera Cruz to the City of Mexico), perceiving the necessity, and eager to serve his country (for whose cause he finally gave his life), offered to lead the charge across the causeway against the main battery, with the bayonet. The delighted Foster said, you are the man, the Ninth the regiment, and this is the moment! Zouaves, storm the battery! he shouted--forward! in John G. Foster. an instant they were on the run across the causeway, yelling fearfully, and cheered by their admiring comrades o
Saint Thomas (Canada) (search for this): chapter 7
om he considered as the embodiment of dispatches; but the reduced number of his officers and crew, and the large number of passengers on board bound to Europe, who would be put to great inconvenience in not being able to join the steamer from St. Thomas to Europe, decided him to allow them to proceed. this weak point in the proceedings was noticed by the Secretary of the Navy, both in his congratulatory letter to Captain Wilkes and his annual Report. it was his business to capture lawfully, bthe British gun-boat Rinaldo to proceed to Provincetown, Massachusetts, for that purpose, where, on the 1st of January, 1862, the prisoners were delivered to the protection of the British flag. They awere conveyed First to Bermuda, and then to St. Thomas, where they embarked for England, and arrived at Southampton on the 29th of the same month. when the captives could no longer serve a political purpose for the ruling class in great Britain, they sank into their proper insignificance, and, a
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
pture of the conspirators, and he was in the office of the Secretary of War when the electrograph containing it was brought in and read. He can never forget the scene that ensued. Led by the Secretary, who was followed by Governor Andrew of Massachusetts, and others, cheer after cheer was given by the company, with a will. Later in the day, the writer, accompanied by the late Elisha Whittlesey, First Comptroller of the Treasury, was favored with a brief interview with the President, when theith the intention of turning the Confederate left flank, where Lieutenant-Colonel Frank Anderson was in command of a battalion of Wise's Legion. the fight in that direction soon became warm, while it continued to rage fiercely in the front. Massachusetts, Connecticut, New York, and New Jersey troops were zealous rivals in deeds of daring, fortitude, courage, and generosity. They continually gained advantages, but at the cost of heavy work. Parke came up with his Fourth Rhode Island, Colonel
London (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 7
ed among the British cruisers, and captures were made under it before its existence was known in London I! For that treachery, English statesmen and publicists offered the selfish excuse that it was B(immediately after the arrival of the passengers of the Trent), men were engaged in the Tower of London in packing twenty-five thousand muskets to be sent to Canada. On the 4th, December, 1861. a ros of your legation, bringing with you the archives of the legation, and to repair immediately to London; if, however, you should be of opinion that the requirements of Her Majesty's Government are subr. Seward, the Secretary of State, in a confidential note to Mr. Adams, the American Minister in London, See page 567, volume I. alluded to the affair, and The Union Generals. George W. Childs Psappointment. They had tried to fan the flame of discord between the Cabinets of Washington and London. In England, Liverpool was the focus of efforts in aid of the rebellion. There the friends of
Elizabeth (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
rn end of the Sound. This was easily done on the day after the capture of Elizabeth City, Feb. 12, 1862. a body of flying artillery stationed there having left it precipitately without firing a shot. Maury destroyed a schooner on the stocks and eight cannon, and then passed on, capturing vessels on the Sound. On the following day, Feb. 13. Lieutenant Jeffers, with some of the fleet, proceeded to the Chesapeake and Albemarle Canal, that traverses the Dismal Swamp on its way from the Elizabeth River to the Pasquotank, for the purpose of disabling it. They found Confederates engaged in the same work, who fled on the approach of the Nationals. The latter sunk two schooners in the Canal and departed. Finally, on the 19th, the combined fleet set out from Edenton on a reconnaissance, which extended up the Chowan River as far as Winton (which was partially destroyed), and the Roanoke to Plymouth. The Perry, bearing Colonel Hawkins and a company of his Zouaves, received a volley of mus
Fort Johnston (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
our-gun battery on the shore, and one heavy gun in the town in front. The whole force was in charge of Commander Lynch. Rowan opened fire upon flotilla and batteries at about nine o'clock. After a short but very severe engagement, Lynch, who was on shore, signalled for the abandonment of the vessels, when they were run aground and set on fire. Then the Confederates fled, and Lynch, retiring to the interior of North Carolina, was not heard of again during the war until he reappeared at Smithville, when Fort Fisher was captured, early in 1865. Shortly after the flight of the Confederates, Acting Master's-mate J. H. Raymond planted the National flag on the shore battery, and thus proclaimed the first conquest achieved by the Nationals on the main of North Carolina. The battle had lasted only forty minutes, and Rowan's loss was only two killed and five or six wounded. an extraordinary example of heroism was exhibited during this engagement by John Davis, a Finlander, who was a
Burlington (New Jersey, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
ity of New York, Captain Nye. It went down in sight of the shore, Jan. 12. with four hundred barrels of gunpowder, one thousand five hundred rifles, eight hundred shells, and other stores and supplies; but no human life perished with it. Nor was any man lost in the other vessels that were wrecked; but of a party who went ashore from one of the transports Jan. 14, 1862. yet outside, three were drowned by the upsetting of their boat on its return. These were Colonel J. W. Allen, of Burlington, New Jersey, commander of the Ninth regiment from that State; the surgeon, F. S. Weller; and the mate of the transport. it was several days before all of the surviving vessels of the expedition entered the Inlet. The weather continued boisterous. Many of them drew too much water to allow them to cross the bars; and the remainder of the month of January was spent in overcoming the difficulties of that perilous passage, and in making full preparations for moving forward over the still waters
Fort Fisher (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
the shore, and one heavy gun in the town in front. The whole force was in charge of Commander Lynch. Rowan opened fire upon flotilla and batteries at about nine o'clock. After a short but very severe engagement, Lynch, who was on shore, signalled for the abandonment of the vessels, when they were run aground and set on fire. Then the Confederates fled, and Lynch, retiring to the interior of North Carolina, was not heard of again during the war until he reappeared at Smithville, when Fort Fisher was captured, early in 1865. Shortly after the flight of the Confederates, Acting Master's-mate J. H. Raymond planted the National flag on the shore battery, and thus proclaimed the first conquest achieved by the Nationals on the main of North Carolina. The battle had lasted only forty minutes, and Rowan's loss was only two killed and five or six wounded. an extraordinary example of heroism was exhibited during this engagement by John Davis, a Finlander, who was a gunner's mate on
Southfield (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
est; corn. Barney, R. D. Renshaw; corn. Perry, C. H. Flusser; Delaware, S. P. Quackenbush; granite, E. Boomer; granite, W. B. Avery; Gen. Putnam, W. J. Hoskiss; Huzzar, Fred. Crocker; Hunchback, E. R. Calhoun; Hetzel, H. K. Davenport; J. Nv. Seymour, F. S. Welles; Louisiana, Hooker; Lockwood, S. L. Graves; Lancer, B. Morley; Morse, Peter Hayes; Philadelphia, Silas Reynolds; pioneer, C. S. Baker; picket, T. P. Ives; rocket, James Lake; Ranger, J. B. Childs; Stars and Stripes, Reed Werden; Southfield, Behm; Shawsheen, T. S. Wood-ward; shrapnel, Ed. Staples; Underwriter, Jeffers; Valley City, J. C. Chaplin; Vidette,---------; White-head, French; young Rover, I. B. Studley. every thing necessary for the peculiar service assigned to the expedition was furnished and arranged. The fleet guns were equipped with ship and field carriages, that they might be used on land or water; and the cannon were mostly of the newest construction. A well-organized signal corps accompanied the expedition,
rebelling against it, the Irish people--a conquered nation, and made a part of Great Britain against their will — had the fullest warrant for rebelling against their English conquerors at any and at all times. Among these men we find the names of John Stuart Mill, Professors Goldwin Smith and J. E. Cairnes, Rev. Baptist Noel, Henry Vincent, Layard, the eminent Eastern traveler, the eloquent young O'Donoughue, The O'Donoughue, as he was called, was of one of the most ancient families in Ireland. He was less. than thirty years of age at that time, of great beauty in form and feature, polished in manners, eloquent in speech, of proven courage, and a man of the people in his instincts. In the great Rotunda in Dublin, this man boldly declared to an audience of 5,000 persons, after the reception of the news of the Trent affair, that if war should come, Ireland would be found on the side of America. This declaration was received with the most vehement applause. and others less conspi
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