hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Charleston (South Carolina, United States) 898 0 Browse Search
N. P. Banks 776 2 Browse Search
Raphael Semmes 707 3 Browse Search
United States (United States) 694 0 Browse Search
Vicksburg (Mississippi, United States) 676 8 Browse Search
Alexander M. Grant 635 1 Browse Search
Fort Fisher (North Carolina, United States) 452 6 Browse Search
David D. Porter 385 63 Browse Search
Thomas W. Sherman 383 7 Browse Search
Fort Jackson (Louisiana, United States) 338 2 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. Search the whole document.

Found 1,446 total hits in 483 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 ...
China (China) (search for this): chapter 48
r coffers. So he applied the torch without compunction, and the career of the Golden Eagle was speedily terminated. The Alabama now crossed the equator and stationed herself in the great tollgate of commerce, through which traders from India, China, the Pacific Ocean and South America were continually passing, rejoicing as they reached these latitudes that the long, weary road was behind them, and that but a short and easy passage lay between them and their homes. It had never occurred trew and such of the cargo as he wanted, Semmes applied the torch, and she went off before the wind in flames with all sail set. The Talisman had a number of 12-pounder field-pieces on board, and boilers and machinery for a gun-boat to be built in China to take part in the Chinese war. Semmes took two of the guns on board his vessel for the purpose of fitting out a consort when the proper vessel should fall into his hands. Semmes continued his course along the Brazilian coast, and now began t
Newburyport (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 48
Notwithstanding the uncomplimentary manner in which Captain Semmes had treated the flag which has braved a thousand years the battle and the breeze, when tile Alabama arrived at her next port and anchored off the little town of Malacca, the English officers and inhabitants went wild over her. After leaving this place, Semmes fell in with an English vessel, the master of which gave him such information as enabled him to capture two large American ships in that vicinity. the Sonora, of Newburyport, and the Highlander. of Boston. When the Master of The Alabama off Capetown. From a sketch by Rear-Admiral Walke. the Sonora came on board the Alabama, he said pleasantly to Captain Semmes: I have been expecting you for the last three years. Semmes answered that lie was glad the Captain had found him after so long a search. It is some such search, replied the other, as the devil may be supposed to make after holy water! This good humor saved the captives from imprisonment, and the
Yucatan (Yucatan, Mexico) (search for this): chapter 48
boat, that had been used to carry passengers on the Delaware. The Alabama had much the greater speed, and her fire was more accurate, owing to the fact that the crew of the Hatteras were somewhat demoralized by the first, unexpected, broadside. Semmes did not seem disposed to make much capital out of this victory. Nothing remained for him to do in this vicinity; so, after he had picked up the officers and crew of the Hatteras, he put out all his lights and steamed away for the coast of Yucatan, congratulating himself that he had been able to satisfy his men with this substitute for his contemplated attack on Banks' transports. The Alabama received little damage in the fight, and on January 20th arrived at Jamaica, where the prisoners were landed, on parole, to find their way home as best they could. It is but fair to state that the officers and men of the Hatteras were kindly treated by their captors, and Lieutenant-Commander Blake was received as a guest in the cabin. The A
Cape Town (South Africa) (search for this): chapter 48
e 28th of July Semmes anchored in Saldanha Bay. not venturing to Cape Town until he had ascertained that the coast was clear of American vesof Africa with an assorted cargo. Her capture was witnessed from Cape Town and caused intense excitement among the inhabitants, a majority og driven from the sea. The U. S. Steamer Vanderbilt arrived at Cape Town after the Alabama left, but the officers and crew received no sucer consorts at Angra Pequeña, in the Hottentot country. While at Cape Town, an English merchant proposed to purchase the Sea Bride and her cvoided the beaten track. On the 20th of March Semmes went into Cape Town for coal and provisions, and there found the Tuscaloosa, which veritish authorities and afterwards released. The news received at Cape Town from the Confederate States was far from encouraging; everything ing the important whale fishery, greatly crippled. Semmes left Cape Town March 25th, the Alabama keeping in the fair way leading from the
Fort Fisher (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 48
k, Captain-of-Afterguard; Charles A. Reed and William S. Morgan, Seamen; Joshua E. Carey, Sailmaker's-Mate; James Magee, Ordinary Seaman; Benj. S. Davis, Officer's Cook; John F. Bickford, Coxswain; Wm. Gurney, Seaman; Wm. Smith, Quartermaster; Lawrence T. Crowley, Ordinary Seaman; Hugh McPherson, Gunner's-Mate; Taran Phillips, Ordinary Seaman; Joachim Pease, Seaman; Benj. H. Blaisdell and Joel B. Blaisdell, First-Class Firemen; Charles Fisher, Officer's-Cook; James Henson, Wm. M. Smith, Win. Fisher, George Bailey and Martin Hoyt, Landsmen; Mark G. Ham, Carpenter's-Mate; Win. H. Bastine, Landsman; Layman P. Spinney, Adoniram Littlefield, John W. Young and Will Wain-wright, Coalheavers; John E. Orchon, Second-class Fireman; George W. Remick, Joel L. Sanborn, Jere. Young and Wm. Smith, First-class Firemen; Stephen Smith, John F. Stackpole, Wm. Stanley and Lyman H. Hartford, Second-class Firemen; True W. Priest and Joseph Dugan, First-class Firemen; John F. Dugan, Coalheaver; James W. She
Yokohama (Japan) (search for this): chapter 48
er a press of sail. Not until the Alabama got up steam did she gain on the chase, and it was only after many hours that the Confederate vessel overhauled and captured her. On this occasion the Alabama, for the first time, hoisted the new flag of the Southern Confederacy, a white ensign with cross and stars, rather a handsome flag and a great improvement on the original banner of secession, although it could have little effect in sustaining a declining cause. The prize was the Contest from Yokohama, with a light cargo of Japanese goods consigned to merchants in New York. The two vessels were anchored in fourteen fathoms in the open sea with no land visible, and it was after night-fall before the crew and plunder of the prize were removed to the Alabama. Then the torch was applied to the captured vessel, and the little plunderer sailed away in search of other victims. Semmes now turned the Alabama's head to the eastward, and passed through Carimata Strait in five days, although ve
East India (search for this): chapter 48
nd they were allowed to take their boats with provisions and start for Singapore. After the usual cremation services, the Alabama steamed out past the light-ship, and was once more in the Indian Ocean. Query, were the two ships above-named burned in neutral waters? The Alabama now proceeded to the Bay of Bengal, and on the 11th of January captured and burned the Emma Jane. of Bath. Maine. This was the last vessel burned by Captain Semmes in that quarter. Further continuance in the East Indies did not promise much profit and the Alabama finally proceeded towards the Cape of Good Hope. But even in that quarter there were no prizes to be found. American vessels that were not laid up in port or transferred to the British flag avoided the beaten track. On the 20th of March Semmes went into Cape Town for coal and provisions, and there found the Tuscaloosa, which vessel lie had sent to cruise on the coast of Brazil and which had been seized by the British authorities and afterwa
Pensacola (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 48
his mind to run through the whole blockading fleet if necessary. It was his last chance; he had only to do that or run his vessel on shore and burn her, for she was of no use to the Confederates in her then condition. As soon as Maffitt discovered the Federal vessels, he stood directly for them, knowing that, as the Florida resembled an English gun-boat, she would probably be mistaken for one, and trusting to his speed to save him at the last moment. Intelligence had been received at Pensacola. the headquarters of the squadron, of the Florida's having left Nassau; but no news of her having reached Cardenas had followed, and for some reason no intimation had been sent to the fleet off Mobile that she was on a cruise. At that time English ships-of-war were in the habit of going along the coast to see if the blockade was effectual, and it was customary for them to enter blockaded ports after reporting to the commanding officer of the blockading force and obtaining his permissio
Bay of Bengal (search for this): chapter 48
found him after so long a search. It is some such search, replied the other, as the devil may be supposed to make after holy water! This good humor saved the captives from imprisonment, and they were allowed to take their boats with provisions and start for Singapore. After the usual cremation services, the Alabama steamed out past the light-ship, and was once more in the Indian Ocean. Query, were the two ships above-named burned in neutral waters? The Alabama now proceeded to the Bay of Bengal, and on the 11th of January captured and burned the Emma Jane. of Bath. Maine. This was the last vessel burned by Captain Semmes in that quarter. Further continuance in the East Indies did not promise much profit and the Alabama finally proceeded towards the Cape of Good Hope. But even in that quarter there were no prizes to be found. American vessels that were not laid up in port or transferred to the British flag avoided the beaten track. On the 20th of March Semmes went into C
Malacca (Melaka, Malaysia) (search for this): chapter 48
ities might call him to an account for burning a vessel under the British flag, so he called the unlucky shipmaster into his cabin and extorted from him a confession that he had resorted to a stratagemn to save his ship in case lie should fall in with the Alabama. Notwithstanding the uncomplimentary manner in which Captain Semmes had treated the flag which has braved a thousand years the battle and the breeze, when tile Alabama arrived at her next port and anchored off the little town of Malacca, the English officers and inhabitants went wild over her. After leaving this place, Semmes fell in with an English vessel, the master of which gave him such information as enabled him to capture two large American ships in that vicinity. the Sonora, of Newburyport, and the Highlander. of Boston. When the Master of The Alabama off Capetown. From a sketch by Rear-Admiral Walke. the Sonora came on board the Alabama, he said pleasantly to Captain Semmes: I have been expecting you for the
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 ...