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South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
As against whites, in courts of justice, the negro has not the faintest chance of fairness. I could illustrate this statement by citing examples; but, as a South Carolina Governor has confessed the fact, it will suffice to quote his admission. Says Governor Adams in his message for 1855: The administration of our laws, in s the sum of all villainies. Ii. The insurrection hero. Hon. J. C. Vaughan This chapter is a Contribution by the Hon. J. C. Vaughan, formerly of South Carolina, now of Kansas: once a Southern slaveholder, now one of the truest champions of freedom in the nation. It is a graphic picture of the terror caused by the rull we be discouraged. Revolutions never go backward. The second American Revolution has begun. Kansas was its Lexington: Texas will be its Bunker Hill, and South Carolina its Yorktown. It is fashionable for our animalcule-statesmen to lament or affirm that slavery cannot speedily be abolished. It is so wrought and interwove
Alabama (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
reatly from the existence of slavery. They are deprived by it of the most remunerative employment, and excluded from the most fertile lands. I once heard a poor Alabama farmer lament that he would soon have to move, as they were beginning to close him in again. I asked what he meant? He said that, years and years ago, he and seht of buying a passage out through----'s plantation; but he wants my land, and would charge so high a rent for the passage that I could not afford to pay it. (In Alabama and most Southern States, the land is not laid out as in many of the Northern and the Western States--multiplication-table fashion; the roads are crooked, the fare of Senator Douglas, is between the negro and the crocodile, is utterly without foundation, and is refuted by facts. There is nothing more common in Georgia and Alabama than to see white men, and white women too, at work in the fields at every hour of the day. Of course, these persons belong to the class of poor white trash. But
Charleston (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
rmin who fester in the Five Points cellars, the North street saloons, or the dancing houses and levee of New Orleans or Charleston. Not so vile, however, as the rabble of the Platte Region, who distinguished themselves as the champions of the South to be a Southerner and a friend of their peculiar or sectional crime. The Southern Agriculturist, published at Charleston, South Carolina, thus faithfully describes this class of persons: Overseers are changed every year; a few remain four or fies. The preceding chapter will show how an earnest man can use this power. I remember an incident narrated to me at Charleston, which illustrates this point. In conversation upon various subjects with Col.----, a fine specimen of the Southern pla woman who lived with him as his wife. He had immediately decamped, and was supposed to have gone in the direction of Charleston. I was about returning to my home; and my friend, an active magistrate, proposed that we should endeavor to overtake t
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
on, and such another will bring so much, when it has grown a little more, I have frequently heard people say, in the street, or the public houses. That a slave woman is commonly esteemed least for her laboring qualities, most for those qualities which give value to a brood-mare, is, also, constantly made apparent. A slaveholder writing to me with regard to my cautious statements on this subject, made in the Daily Times, says: In the States of Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, Kentucky, Tennessee and Missouri, as much attention is paid to the breeding and growth of negroes as to that of horses and mules. Further South, we raise them both for use and for market. Planters command their girls and women (married or unmarried) to have children; and I have known a great many negro girls to be sold off, because they did not have children. A breeding woman is worth from one-sixth to one-fourth more than one that does not breed. XIII. The lower classes of the Southern States hate an
Mexico (Mexico) (search for this): chapter 7
Negro and Spanish origin. There are numbers of fugitives from American slavery among them, who superadd to a deadly national animosity, a still stronger hatred of a race of tyrants. Texas is a tempting bait for the North; the greatest territorial prize of the age. By the terms of its admission, it may be divided into five States. What shall the character of those States be? There are numbers of resolute pioneers in Kansas who have sworn that Texas shall again be free — as it was under Mexican domination — before the flag of the free waved over it. They have declared that a line of free States shall extend, southward, to the Mexican Gulf; that slavery shall, westward, find the bound which it cannot pass. Within the borders of Texas there is already a numerous free-labor population, whose numbers, by the organized emigration movement, will speedily be increased and presently preponderate. The wealth of the North, which would shudder at the idea of a servile insurrection, is alre
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 7
no other aid? Yes; for there are negroes enslaved in the Indian Territory: the descendants of the bravest warriors America has produced — the hunted maroons, who, for forty years, in the swamps of Florida, defied the skill and armies of the United States. They hate slavery and the race that upholds it, and are longing for an opportunity to display that hatred. Not far from this territory, in a neighboring province of Mexico, live a nation of trained negro soldiers — the far-famed Florida Indians, who, after baffling and defying the United States, and after having been treacherously enslaved by the Creeks, incited thereto by Federal officials, bravely resisted their oppressors and made an Exodus, the grandest since the days of Moses, to a land of freedom. Already have their oppressors felt their prowess; and their historian tells us--they will be heard from again. See The Exiles of Florida, by Joshua R. Giddings. Mark the significant warning! Arrizonia is a mining country.
Canada (Canada) (search for this): chapter 7
ary are at rest. For the following account of life in the Swamp, I am indebted to the courtesy of Mrs. Knox, of Boston. It was narrated by a fugitive slave in Canada, whose words, as he uttered them, she reported verbatim. She purposes to publish, a volume of autobiographical sketches of the Canadian fugitives; and it is from . I married Lizzy, and had a ceremony over it, coz I loved her an‘ she loved me. Well, arter I heern dat she was livin‘ wid ‘nudder man, dat ar made me to come to Canada. Ole man Fisher was us boys' preacher. He runned away and used to pray, like he's ‘n earnest. I camped wid him. Many's been de ‘zortation I have ‘sperienced But I would not fear the extension of American slavery, even if the neighboring nations were more friendly to it. The South will soon find enough to do at home. Canada has hitherto been the safety valve of Southern slavery. The bold and resolute negroes, who were fitted by their character to incite the slaves to rebellion,
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
ld to learn to pick cotton, and such another will bring so much, when it has grown a little more, I have frequently heard people say, in the street, or the public houses. That a slave woman is commonly esteemed least for her laboring qualities, most for those qualities which give value to a brood-mare, is, also, constantly made apparent. A slaveholder writing to me with regard to my cautious statements on this subject, made in the Daily Times, says: In the States of Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, Kentucky, Tennessee and Missouri, as much attention is paid to the breeding and growth of negroes as to that of horses and mules. Further South, we raise them both for use and for market. Planters command their girls and women (married or unmarried) to have children; and I have known a great many negro girls to be sold off, because they did not have children. A breeding woman is worth from one-sixth to one-fourth more than one that does not breed. XIII. The lower classes of the
Montgomery (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
le cruel and unusual punishments — are circumstances of daily occurrence in every Southern State. IX. I heard a planter one day sneering at the ladies who advocated woman's rights. He was shocked that women should attempt to go out of their sphere. On his plantation, near Savannah, I saw women filling dung carts, hoeing, driving oxen, ploughing, and engaged in many other similar employments. Is it within woman's sphere to perform such labors? X. One of the proprietors of the Montgomery (Alabama) Mail, at the period of my visit to that town, described to me the execution by a mob of a negro by fire at the stake. He had either killed a white man or ravished a white girl — I have since forgotten which-but one sentence of his account, for its characteristic Southern inhumanity to the negro, I shall never forget to my dying day. They piled pretty green wood on the fire, to make it burn slow; he gave one terrible yell before he died; and, every time the wind blew from him, there wa
ll look in vain to Central America. The same mixed races who hate the modern Norman in Mexico inhabit those regions, and are animated by the same true spirit; and the attempt, if ever made, to subdue this people, in order to extend the area of bondage, will justly precipitate a war with the powers of Europe. The South does not dare to hazard a war with such great powers on such an issue. The islands of the American Archipelago are to-day almost exclusively in the hands of the liberated African race. The first serious attempt at annexation will put them entirely in the possession of the blacks. Cuba has already, within her borders, seven thousand self-emancipated citizens; and it is a fact, well known in our State Department, that the Spanish rulers of that island would unhesitatingly arm the black population, both slave and free, in the event of any serious attempt at conquest. But I would not fear the extension of American slavery, even if the neighboring nations were more f
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