hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 120 0 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 117 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 110 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 108 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 108 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 108 0 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 106 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 8 104 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 100 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 94 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) or search for Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 47 results in 22 document sections:

1 2 3
Stevens' motion was agreed to. Mr. Colfax (Rep., Ind.) was called to preside over the Committee. Mr. Stevens, (Rep., Pa.,) from the Committee on Ways and Means, reported a bill for the support of the army for the fiscal year ending with June ndemanding a change of policy, while a secret conclave of the Governors of the States of Ohio, New York, Massachusetts, Pennsylvania and other States convened in this city and promised men and money to carry on the irrepressible conflict; and thus it merce of the West began to look to the South, from which it had been directed years ago by the canals and railroads of Pennsylvania and New York, at a heavy cost to the West. They threatened to resume their ancient and accustomed channels — the wately for the repeal of the tariff act. Threatened thus with the loss of both political power and wealth, New England and Pennsylvania--that land of peace — began now, too, to demand coercion and civil war as the price of the preservation of their wealt
one hundred prisoners, and more coming in constantly. I know already of ten officers killed and prisoners. Their retreat is complete. I occupied Beverly by a rapid march. Garnett abandoned his camp early in the morning, leaving much of his equipage. He came within a few miles of Beverly, but our rapid march turned him back in great confusion, and he is now retreating on the road to St. George. I have ordered Gen. Morris to follow him up closely. I have telegraphed for the two Pennsylvania regiments at Cumberland to join Gen. Hill at Rowlesburg. The General is concentrating all his troops at Rowlesburg, and he will cut off Garnett's retreat near West Union, or, if possible, at St. George. I may say that we have driven out some ten thousand troops, strongly intrenched, with the loss of 11 killed and 35 wounded. The provision returns here show Garnett's force to have been ten thousand men. They were Eastern Virginians, Tennesseans, Georgians, and, I think, Carolinians.
behind timber, I believe.) When they left it, a concealed battery near the barn opened on our forces, with very little effect, I fancy. Shortly afterwards, more of our artillery came up, and when that opened upon the enemy's position in the woods along the creek border, a second masked battery of theirs, surrounded by their infantry in the woods, replied. That did us considerable damage. I saw four or five of our killed or wounded carried past me to the rear on litters. Dr. Pullston, of Pa., Mr. McCormick, of the N. Y. Evening Post, Mr. Hill, of the N. Y. Tribune, Mr. Raymond, of the N. Y. Times, myself, and a few other civilians, were at that time standing, surrounded by a few straggling soldiers, quietly looking on from the top of the hill, immediately where Gen. Tyler had taken his station. One of the first shells fired from that second battery of the enemy passed between the shoulders of Dr. Pullston and Mr. McCormick, who were arm-in-arm, and burst against a small building
the entire available surface of the late United States. But the slave trade suppressed, democratic society has triumphed. The States of New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and Delaware, found an attractive market for their slaves. They found a cheaper pauper labor to replace it; that pauper labor poured in from Europe; while itn pauper labor ready to supply their place. Maryland, Virginia, Kentucky, Missouri, possibly Tennessee and North Carolina, may lose their slaves, as New York, Pennsylvania, and New Jersey have. In that condition they must recommence the contest. There is no avoiding that necessity. The systems cannot mix; and thus it is that sst in regarding the negro but as a thing of trade — a thing which they are too good to use, but only can produce for others' uses — and join the confederacy as Pennsylvania or Massachusetts might do, not to support the structure, but to profit by it, it were as well they should not join, and we can find no interest in such associa
er to complete my observations of the battle and follow the army in its further progress. At that time there were five regiments of volunteers as a reserve, and among them Colonel Max Einstein's Pennsylvania volunteers, the only distinctively Pennsylvania regiment any way concerned in the action. This body had been intended as a part of the advance, and with that impression its soldiers had left their quarters at the early hour of the morning when the movement commenced. There was a change inho rent the air with repeated shouts. In less time than it takes to write these ten lines, they were in line, every man at his position, expecting the order to march. As I witnessed this spectacle, and recollected that in this regiment alone Pennsylvania was represented, I could not but feel proud of my State, and regret that her soldiers could not have taken part in the great events of this momentous day. As I have said, it was necessary that I should reach Fairfax at an early hour in the
an officer in the secession army, whose name I cannot just now think of. To-day the Second Massachusetts regiment marched for Harper's Ferry, and this whole column, it is expected, will soon be moved there. --N. Y. Time, July 26. A correspondent of the Philadelphia Press makes the following statement:-- Hagerstown, Md., July 25, 1861. sir:--You will confer a favor upon the friends of justice by giving space to the accompanying statement. I make this request in behalf of Pennsylvania, whose commanding General has been accused of dereliction of duty. The following is based upon the information of citizens of Berkeley county, Virginia, well known to me, who, having been impressed in the rebel force, deserted therefrom: At the time the first advance into Virginia was ordered General Johnston's force numbered over 14,000 men, and had attached to it a park of splendid artillery. General Patterson's command did not exceed 11,000 men, and he had not over eight pieces of
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 121.-General McClellan's command. (search)
al order defines the extent of General McClellan's new command: war Department, Adjutant-General's office, Washington, July 25, 1861. First--There will be added to the Department of the Shenandoah the counties of Washington, Alleghany, in Maryland, and such other parts of Virginia as may be covered by the army in its operations. And there will be added to the Department of Washington the counties of Prince George, Montgomery, and Frederick. The remainder of Maryland, and all of Pennsylvania and Delaware, will constitute the Department of Pennsylvania, Headquarters Baltimore. The Department of Washington and the Department of Northeastern Virginia will constitute a geographical division under Major-General McClellan, United States Army, Headquarters Washington. Second--All officers of volunteer regiments will be subject to examination by a Military Board, to be appointed by this department with the concurrence of the General-in-Chief, as to their fitness for the positions
Doc. 124.-proclamation of Gen. Patterson. Headquarters Department of Pennsylvania, Harper's Ferry, July 31, 1861. General orders. The term for which the troops from Pennsylvania were called into service having expired, and nearly all of them having returned to their homes, the Commanding-General, by direction of the War Department, relinquishes command of this department on the expiration of the term of service. The Commanding-General regrets to leave you, but it is with satisfaction that you have steadily advanced in the face of the enemy in greatly superior numbers and artillery, and offered battle which they refused until protected by their strong intrenchments at Winchester. You have done all that was possible, and more than could have been expected or was demanded, and if advantage has not been taken of your sacrifice, and if the fruits of your campaign have been lost, the fault cannot be imputed to you. To the members of the Department and staff, he tenders
authority. The Executive Council [of the State of Pennsylvania] being formed of residents of the city and cnded to the Supreme Executive Council of the State of Pennsylvania to hear what the said remonstrants can alleg in the Mason's Lodge, they being inhabitants of Pennsylvania; and therefore, as the Council declines giving t refuse to swear or affirm allegiance to the State of Pennsylvania, to Staunton, in Virginia. The remonstrair last resource, they applied under the laws of Pennsylvania, to be brought before the judicial courts by wria resolution of the Supreme Executive Council of Pennsylvania, dated April 8, 1778, as follows: Ordered, Tabeas corpus was suspended by the authorities of Pennsylvania during the Revolution, in the case of persons whladelphia, where Congress was sitting; it was in Pennsylvania where these persons, who were considered inimicarth Carolina, may lose their slaves as New York, Pennsylvania, and New Jersey have done. In that condition th
Doc. 173 1/2.-U. S. Executive Government, 1857-61. President.--James Buchanan, of Penn. Vice-President.--John C. Breckinridge, of Ky. Secretaries of State.--Lewis Cass, of Michigan; Jeremiah S. Black of Penn., appt. Dec. 17, 1860. SecrPenn., appt. Dec. 17, 1860. Secretary of the Navy.--Isaac Toucey, of Conn. Secretaries of War.--John B. Floyd, of Va.; Joseph Holt, of Ky., appt. Jan. 18, 1861. Secretaries of the Treasury.--Howell Cobb, of Ga.; Philip F. Thomas, of Md., appt. Dec. 12, 1860; John A. Dix, o Secretary of the Interior.--Jacob Thompson, of Miss. Postmasters-General.--Joseph Holt, of Ky.; Horatio King, of Me., appt. Feb. 12, 1861. Attorneys-General.--Jeremiah S. Black, of Penn.; Edwin M. Stanton, of Penn., appt. Dec. 20, 1860. Secretary of the Interior.--Jacob Thompson, of Miss. Postmasters-General.--Joseph Holt, of Ky.; Horatio King, of Me., appt. Feb. 12, 1861. Attorneys-General.--Jeremiah S. Black, of Penn.; Edwin M. Stanton, of Penn., appt. Dec. 20, 1860.
1 2 3